Rowell Garage

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Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 15, 2011 - 11:06am PT
This is where Galen Rowell had his auto garage in the sixties. I happened to be driving by a few days ago and took this HDR shot with my phone.


It is located on San Pablo Avenue in Albany, Ca. It was called Rowell Garage, as I remember, and he was a Chevy specialist. It was the scene of many misadventure and the generator of much lore even for decades later. Some real characters emerged from that work environment too whom Galen would actually get into climbing. The garage has even come up every now and then here on Supertopo.

Although Galen’s real life work is thought to have been his photography and general, vigorous alpinism, he was in his heart of hearts, still a Chevy Boy and knew a great deal about them. When I first met him in 1963 this was a great deal of what Galen was about and he was always in uniform greaser-style, despite his being raised by an erudite Berkeley family. Skintight stretch Levi’s and white skintight t-shirts with the short sleeves always rolled up. I think he was very much his own person growing up.

I remember most clearly the black and white special Chevy Nomad he had still in the seventies. It was a Chevy station wagon but the Nomad was a special edition which had a lowered height to the cab, making it look “bad” and “cruiser”. He had reconfigured the manual transmission so somehow it had something like 8-12 gears...?? It had of course, gobs of horsepower. And had attached irrevocably to the floor in the back, sat a steel locking case for his photographic equipment. His other thrill was of course Corvettes. There was a period too when he was “away for awhile” due to stolen auto parts marketing. All this long before the very much more cultured last half of his life.

An example very similar to Galen's ride:


donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 15, 2011 - 11:09am PT
Nice remebrance Peter, those are some classic cars!
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Mar 15, 2011 - 11:33am PT
cool insight, didn't know. The Chevy Nomad is a classic. My grandfather had one that he kept. Baby blue, all the trim still intact until he moved just a decade or so ago. Wish I had the chance to work on that chevy. Alas, I had a Ford Torino (not the boss) 71. Something visceral about a V8 with gobs of horsepower. thx for the post
Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 15, 2011 - 11:50am PT
Thanks, Peter. That brings it rolling right back.

I once rebuilt my VW bug in the yard out back. Galen had kindly driven up to Sacramento and towed my dead car clear back to his shop. Maybe, though, he didn't want a VW messing with his image as a red-blooded Chevy mechanic; in any case, he offered the outback for my rebuild. I gratefully accepted.

That was maybe '72 and Galen's transformation was already in evidence. His desk in the little office in back held a typewriter, and every chance he got Galen worked out stories on it for Ascent, and beyond.
Eric Beck

Sport climber
Bishop, California
Mar 15, 2011 - 12:24pm PT
I sometimes cycled over to Galen's shop where we talked about climbing and did pullups on the ceiling pipes. Once he asked me if I wanted to go with him to look at an engine. I said ok and off we went to west Oakland, an all black area. After circling the block looking for the address a garage door opened, the person inside saying, "I think you're looking for me." The engine was a 283 sitting on two 4x4s. Galen asked if he could remove a valve cover, the guy said okay. The engine was very clean. Galen extracted the payment in cash; apparently they had previously discussed the price. We all loaded it into Galen's truck. Their parting words, "I don't know you, you don't know me".
BBA

climber
OF
Mar 15, 2011 - 01:02pm PT
Eric's post reminds me of a few tales surrounding Galen - cars and question marks. The "salvaged" Corvette. I don't like to speak ill of the dead, but maybe Guido will.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Mar 15, 2011 - 02:16pm PT
The last time I ever saw Galen was at that garage in his greaser look.
His wife who also had the full '50's look with a teased up boufant hairdo,
(this was Berkeley 1968) was explaining to me how she was 10 months
pregnant but afraid to go to the doctor because he'd get mad and force a
Caesarean. Shortly after that we left for Europe. I always wondered about her
and the baby.

Imagine my surprise when I read about Galen's photography skills years later.
I think he had a new wife by then too.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Mar 15, 2011 - 02:21pm PT
One other story told that day was Galen recounting how he and the son
of Earnest Lawrence of Lawrence Rad Lab fame had rigged up an electrical
wire on their window sill to zap birds that landed there.

I was horrified at the idea but got a glimmer just then of a different social
background for Galen than I had ever imagined. I later heard that his father
was a professor. I always wondered what became of Lawrence's son also.
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Mar 15, 2011 - 03:25pm PT
I like the story where he went on a climbing trip to Tibet, and knowing full well that one of the many freedoms which the unwelcome Chinese overloads of that country had effected was a total ban on pictures of the Dali Lama. So Galen brought a stack of Dali Lama pictures to hand out to Tibetans. They evidently were very grateful, but eventually the authorities figured it out and once they caught on kicked him out of the country permanently. It was a very brave act on his part given what is known about Chinese justice.
Sam R

climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 15, 2011 - 03:40pm PT
I remember driving up to the Buttermilk from Bishop in the late 70's sitting in the backseat of that souped up Chevy station wagon. Of course, Galen was flying up the road, and instead of looking in the mirror and talking to me he would turn around and face me! I'll never forget the terrified look on the guys face in the passenger seat as Galen barely kept the thing on the road. He made me sit in front on the way down...

I also remember that story about his employee becoming a manager for Santana.

Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2011 - 04:36pm PT
Other names connected to the place I recall:
Joe Faint
Scott Walker
Tom Fender
Did Warren buy cars from Galen?
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Mar 15, 2011 - 04:44pm PT
Tom Fender had a kind of shady past too as I recall.

He was incredibly strong though and I was always grateful that
he was in the Valley in the summer of 1965 and was able to climb
up a rope hand over hand for about 50 feet to help get Rodger and
I sorted out after the fall that left me with a broken wrist.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 15, 2011 - 04:53pm PT
Great slice of Bay Area climbing history there Peter.

I think the first EL Bravo was a 1955 Nomad. Black was always the color of choice. Really fits with the levis and white T's. Galen use to tear up the Berkeley Hills with that machine. Offroad to the max, especially along Grizzly Peak and the backside of Tilden Park. Not unknown for him to venture onto the turf even in the Park. Big contrast to the Galen of later years, but such is youth.

Lawrence's son was a good friend of Galen and they use to have some wild parties accessible only by El Bravo. Seclusion of the Berkeley hills, generator, keg and some chicks, what else do you need as the Checkered Demon would say.

Sort of a "catch me if you can" approach. Bad boy Jimmy Dean could have learned a few tricks.

I will have to hold off on stories that delve into the less honorable past until that day in the future when the records can be unsealed. Just kidding. Sort of.

Some photos of 1955 Nomads that have not been Rowellized. Paint it black, max out the rear end and transmission to optimun, put all the door knobs on backwards and give it the most powerful chev 283 and later 327 engine you can build. Then drive it like a demon.


Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 15, 2011 - 05:11pm PT
Great thread Peter!

More tales of mechanized madness at:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1261259&msg=1437739#msg1437739
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Mar 15, 2011 - 05:59pm PT
doorknobs on backwards?
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 15, 2011 - 06:47pm PT
Well, that's rather interesting. A flash from Galen's past. Perhaps climbing gave him an outlet for his energies? Not the first time that climbing, and a bit of maturing, diverted someone from wayward paths. Anyway, I'd heard stories about his cars and driving, but no more. And he did become quite a respectable citizen.

Didn't he start by doing Sierra Club trips with his father, who was quite a bit older, and some sort of professor? (Hence the name Galen - classical physician.) What next?
JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Mar 15, 2011 - 07:18pm PT
I can imagine that beauty flying up old 120. Horsepower and tight suspension, must've been a gas. Thanks P.H.
#310

Social climber
Telluride, CO
Mar 15, 2011 - 08:52pm PT
It was August 1978 in the Valley. I was in my last few months as a park ranger and was the Mall foot patrol supervisory ranger. I lived about a block from the Administration buildings and the Visitor Center. Chuck Kroger was visiting me for that month. Two other friends had come up to see him. They were going on a long hike. I would go to work and take dinner at 7 pm and they would cook after the hike.

I went to shift briefing at 4 pm. the shift supervisor announced that Galen Rowell was in the Valley. I am thinking: cool - I like his photos and books so much. The supervisor continues with "He is driving a 1955 black Chevy Nomad. Do not give him any leeway on speeding or driving the wrong way on the valley loop. Try to give him a ticket or arrest him." I am amazed but show no emotion - ask no questions. 7pm comes and I walk home and suddenly see the black Chevy Nomad parked in front of my apartment. I think "Oh! Maybe he is visiting the Parkers - Lucy and Virginia's parents lived in the house next to my apartment building.

I walk in my apartment and Chuck kisses me and then says - "Look Galen is here for dinner. We were hitching back from our hike and he picked us up. His car is so cool and it has 18 gears including 4 gears in reverse." I smile sweetly at Galen and warn him that every ranger is under orders to bust him for driving infractions or anything they could. He laughs. We had a great and fun dinner. I went back to work and never discussed who I had dinner with that night.

Later, we would see Galen and Barbara in Telluride when they would come for Mountain Film. Chuck and Galen loved to talk about the climbs they had done together BITD and about vehicles. Chuck was so in awe of Galen's ability as a mechanic. Chuck was no slouch as a mechanic either.

Sad that they are all dead now - Galen, Barbara and Chuck would be fun as 90 year olds. I flash on my first encounter with Galen every time I see a Nomad - especially if it is black. Chuck always thought Galen was on the Yosemite NPS hit list because he discovered how many bears the park was killing and wrote a story about it. I have never seen that story.

Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 15, 2011 - 08:57pm PT
Thanks, #310! Did you know a Camp 4 ranger named John Calkins? A chess player, with beard? If so, what became of him? JB thought that he left the NPS in the late 1970s.

I've heard the bear story elsewhere, long ago.
marty(r)

climber
beneath the valley of ultravegans
Mar 15, 2011 - 09:04pm PT
Driving with Galen as retold by Jerry Dodrill:

So Galen's screaming along some mountain highway with Vern Clevenger and Dick Dorworth on board. Dorworth had received notoriety for his Fitzroy climb, ventures into Tibet, and skiing down Everest but at the moment was starting to freak at the speeds with which Galen was punching in and out of turns. Without missing a beat Rowell replies, "What are you worried about Dick? You've been faster than this on skis!"

More full throttle tales are needed. Post up!
BBA

climber
OF
Mar 15, 2011 - 11:34pm PT
I believe Galen was named after Galen Clark, "Guardian of Yosemite". At the time Galen's father was a professor emeritus at UC in either physics or math (I think). It's been a long time since I thought much about "the criminal", our nickname for Galen. He had an interesting friend named Scott who was a Section 8 out of the Marine Corps. My problem was no wheels, so I got a ride with Galen in some hot car sans plates in early 1961, really fast on the curves along the Merced. We did Rixon's East with water running down on us and icicles crashing around. After that trip I decided that hanging around with Galen would be a way to get arrested, even if not guilty of anything that particular day. We still met now and then at Indian Rock. He was afflicted with schemes.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2011 - 11:42pm PT
Bill Amborn, that was Scott Walker.
Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 16, 2011 - 12:03am PT
Hi #310,

Never saw an article, but Galen showed me slides of the bear carcasses. Quite a pile of them, dumped off the side of 120 as it goes down into the Valley. And they were naked. Without their fur coats they looked uncannily human, beefy like well-muscled climbers. Galen was pissed, figuring that the Rangers had scored bearskin rugs along with their genocide.

Not that the LEO Rangers needed more reasons to hunt Galen; there were many.

One time there had been fresh rockfall off the wall above Rixon's Pinnacle. Pretty massive, so the Northside Drive was cordoned off just past Camp 4 with yellow hazard tape. Galen wanted photos and of course ducked under the barricade. A patrol Ranger accosted him and things escalated. The Ranger raised his voice and put his hand on his gun.

At that, Galen started dancing around chanting,

"Shoot me,
Shoot Me,
Shooot me!"
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 16, 2011 - 12:06am PT
To clarify further, Galen found out that not only were the rangers trapping the errant bears, but that they were releasing them from the mobil bear trap, off a sizable cliff on the way out of the Valley, thus killing them.

Dougie, I did not know that they were skinning them..... god, it just won't stop! There must have been a subroutine involved then, before they dumped the poor animals.
BooDawg

Social climber
Butterfly Town
Mar 16, 2011 - 12:06am PT
Galen's bear expose was titled, "The Yosemite Solution to Ursus americanus" and it appeared in the Sierra Club Bulletin #59. It caused quite a stir with photos of where the rangers were dumping their killed bears off the Hwy from Crane Flat near one of those 3 tunnels. But after that story, bear proof boxes and other innovations in policy appeared in the park.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 16, 2011 - 12:08am PT
Yeah, Boo, the program really improved. But in that article did they mention that the bears were skinned? I never heard that.... jesus.

Plus, your new avatar looks a lot like Eleanor Roosevelt. I like it.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 16, 2011 - 12:35am PT
Ah yes the infamous Scott Walker!

Galen's best friend thru Berkeley High and the wild years thereafter. Studly, good looking too a fault, charismatic, the guy could talk a snake charmer out of his snake, and one of the best BSers I have ever known.

In the good season the boys would hang out at the UCB rec outdoor swimming pool in Strawberry Canyon behind the football stadium. The lads would lather up with their special, proprietary tanning solution of coconut butter and iodine and metamorphose into Greek gods. Neither were students at UCB at the time but that never seemed to alarm them. Plenty of young ladies to entertain.

I would call it Galen's "Patrick Swayze Dirty Dancing Era", circa late 50s early 60s, Galen could always be found "hanging" at Mels Drive In in Berserkeley. Almost every evening he would pull up to his favorite slot and hold court. Hard not to think of Newman and Redford in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid." The Checkered Demon would be proud. You have to remember that this is pre Free Speech, Mario Savio and certainly way before Galen became politically active.

If we were headed to the Valley early on a fri night, I often had to wait until midnight because Galen was on a date and just couldn't break away. On one of these late evening in his 63 silver Corvette, he fell asleep at the wheel twice between Planada and Mariposa and we careened off the road at close go 90 mph. On another occasion, we had just wired up the dashboard on another Corvette and while flying along at well over a 100 mph the lights went out. I'm upside down trying to reconnect the wires and Galen is having a wee temper tantrum because he can't see the road.

Once we raced a Porsche from El Portal to Merced. The Porsche would pass us on the curves but Galen would retake the lead on the straightaway. Galen won of course.

On another trip on a friday afternoon we were trying to set a speed record from Berkeley to the Valley. There were enough of us that we worked out a Grand Prix type scenario in case of a flat tire. Sure enough we had a flat and it was like a Fellini movie, but we set a record. This was when the route from Berkeley to 99 was still only two lanes.

Walker use to tell us about his Triumph Bonneville that he left in Berkeley and wanted to bring to the Valley. So I gave him a ride down and we cruised thru the UC parking lots looking for his Triumph that he had loaned to a friend. Sure enough, after several hours he spots his motorcycle, hops out of my car and says he will meet me back in the Valley.

Roper and I had a great time riding the Triumph all over the Valley and only later did we learn that Walker had stolen it that day in Berkeley when I had dropped him off.

One summer the entrance station at Tioga was robbed at gunpoint and our buddy Walker seemed to match the description but nothing ever came of it.

Then there was the time we all sat high in a tree somewhere outside Merced because we had got into a drag race and the police came and were looking for us....................................

Well that is enough for now but feel comforted that there exists no deficit to stories relating to Galen and his Rowellmobile years.



BooDawg

Social climber
Butterfly Town
Mar 16, 2011 - 12:36am PT
I don't remember reading about skinning bears in the article; it may or may not have been in there.

People have said that I look like Will Ferrell but never Elanor Roosevelt! Thanks anyway, Peter.

BTW, Peter, I have a new computer here in CA and will be getting Photoshop installed on it plus a new camera that will take RAW pictures! Only problem will be to find time to learn Photoshop and to scan my slides. I did get some of that emulsion cleaner; it's GREAT STUFF!

GREAT STORIES, Guido! Some I've heard before, of course, but I know it's a deep well where reside your stories of yesteryear! Thanks for sharing.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 16, 2011 - 12:42am PT
Don't worry Boo. Photoshop has sort of "levels'" informally. You can get a bang out of it right away. Also go join Lynda.com for the zillion great tutorials on PS as well as a myriad of other important programs. It is cheap also.
BooDawg

Social climber
Butterfly Town
Mar 16, 2011 - 12:44am PT
Thanks, Peter. Lynda is aleady installed, actually...
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Mar 16, 2011 - 11:22am PT
Great stories! Brings back so many memories of GR. His temper tantrums were legendary. I'll never forget the night while returning from the Valley when a logging train at Chinese Camp stopped on the tracks and blocked his path. He spent about a minute putting all his strength into the Suburban's horn while his blood pressure rose higher and higher until he burst out the door running, screaming, toward the engineer who had just stepped off the train to switch the tracks. Scared for his life the poor fella waved his arms in submission, jumped back on board and backed up the train so the mad man could pass.

Galen was fuming but proud of his success when he got back in the truck. We had been climbing and shooting for a few days on assignment for Rock & Ice. I was pretty tired and actually fell asleep around Manteca but was jolted awake by jarring Bot Dot vibrations while coming down the Altamont Pass. Galen was hunched toward the wheel in that tell-tell position of one who has tried and failed to maintain consciousness but is still fighting. I asked him to let me drive but of course he was "fine" so changed lanes and stepped harder on the pedal just to make sure. For the rest of the drive I was the only one fully awake and kept subtly grabbing the wheel to make critical course corrections when I really thought the end was imminent.
BBA

climber
OF
Mar 16, 2011 - 11:23am PT
Bear genocide was a program started by a Park superintendent (Col. Thomson) back in the 1930's, I believe. He was the one that had the good roads and the big stone buildings at the visitor's center built, too.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 17, 2011 - 02:27am PT
Does anyone know how Galen developed an interest in small planes? Was it transference from cars and climbing, or perhaps acquired from Steve Roper, or?
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Mar 17, 2011 - 03:45am PT
Galen was rather annoyed by my preference for racing British cars: Austin Healy, MG, and Lotus. So one day he took me for a drive from Camp 4 to Tuolumne in a black souped-up Corvette convertible. He told me he was in the business of buying stripped cars from insurance companies and then rebuilding them the way he liked. He was hoping I'd get hooked and buy this one. I'm not sure which of us was more embarrassed when we smelled hot brakes and realized I'd been racing the mountain roads with the hand brake still on.

I told him it was certainly a cool car, but he should check out the new AC Cobras that Jeff Schoolfield was helping Carroll Shelby build in Santa Monica. Not long after, Galen could be seen racing around the valley in a dark green 289 AC Cobra that today would probably be worth half a million bucks. This car pretty much shut down the competition that several of us had been having each weekend from the Bay area to Yosemite.

Shortly before they died, I was driving by a farm west of Bakersfield and saw an old stripped-out black Corvette with no engine or transmission and every body panel smashed. I figured it was about time for me to get the Corvette that Galen wanted me to have, so bought it. Then it became my Galen Rowell memorial project and I built up an engine from a bare four-bolt 350 block, got it running, built up the suspension and brakes, fixed up the body, new leather interior, etc. It's still an evolving project sitting out in my driveway.

Edit: Years ago Galen visited us when I was working in Connecticut and using a small plane to fly business trips. I can't claim to have influenced his interest, but he appreciated the idea of hopping over all the traffic.

Speaking of which, we had some special tricks for getting by the heavy weekend traffic from Livermore to Tracy on the way to Yosemite. If you tried to drive on the shoulder to pass all the bumper to bumper traffic; you'd not get more than a few miles before you'd get a ticket. So we'd race along on the shoulder for a mile or two, and inevitably pick up several over-eager drivers following us; at which point we'd slip back into line and let them go ahead. Soon they would get pulled over by the next available cop. As soon as we had passed by them, we'd repeat the stunt.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Mar 17, 2011 - 05:53am PT
And here I thought Frank Sacherer invented the driving on the shoulder trick! I still use it on occasion in the bus and taxi lanes in Japan if I'm late on an airport run. It helps to have good intuition and that famous tracking sense you talk about on other threads.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 26, 2011 - 02:43pm PT
Hot cars and cold beer Bump!
klk

Trad climber
cali
Mar 26, 2011 - 03:01pm PT
missed this thread first time around.

tx esp. for the photo of the shop-- i always wondered where his garage was.

ive heard lots of the stories but mostly 2nd or 3rd hand.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 26, 2011 - 03:32pm PT
For those that want it pinpointed, it is 660 San Pablo Avenue, Albany nearest cross street is Castro, and next to Hillview Pet Hospital.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Mar 26, 2011 - 04:05pm PT
Best threads on the taco....rj
Chris Jones

Social climber
Glen Ellen, CA
Mar 27, 2011 - 08:04pm PT
Ah Peter, the memories! When on San Pablo Avenue, which is where I buy wine among other essentials, I usually scan the various nondescript buildings knowing that one of them is Galen's old stand. That is it for sure. One fascinating detail is the contrast between the early Galen alluded to here, the slightly disreputable greaser, and his upbringing. Before one trip Galen had to swing by his parent's house. It was a beautiful home in the Berkeley hills. I learned to my complete astonishment that his mother, Margaret Rowell, was a nationally recognized cellist who gave master classes - I later met this gracious lady several times. His father was, as I recall, a professor of rhetoric at Cal.
When Galen, Joe Faint or others and I went on our mad weekend trips in the early 70s- for we were all working stiffs of one stripe or another - we always took Galen's car of the moment, and Galen did almost all the driving. Our cars were simply not up to the task. He drove very fast, was very skilled, and was confident he could handle the highway patrol if pulled over. Galen had a line of patter down about how the officer was perhaps correct; he had recently equipped his car with oversize tires, and of course this meant the speedometer would read too low and so on and so forth. Claimed he had used this line too.
One time around midnight we were tearing down 395 towards Bridgeport. At that time there was a 90 degree left turn somewhere north of town. Galen saw it just too late. He swore, did something magical with the brakes and steering, we spun around and ended up facing the way we came. I have never seen driving like it. (As a reason for his lapse, he said he suffered from an allergy to cat fur, which was on a girlfriends' clothing).
The driving was so much a part of these epics that he titled an article he wrote for Summit something like: "The Thousand Mile Weekend." Maybe someone can find it and post it up?
matty

Trad climber
under the sea
Mar 27, 2011 - 08:57pm PT
It's been posted here before:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1261259/Galen-Rowells-1-000-Mile-Sierra-Weekend-Climbing-1970
David Wilson

climber
CA
Mar 27, 2011 - 10:06pm PT
I drove a lot with Galen and arrived at an alternate theory to Chris above. I just began to think he was lucky. Having road raced around the Berkeley Hills myself, his driving never seemed that precise, yet his tales went on and on. One time, he told me, Harding had a Jaguar and he had his latest souped up corvette or other muscle car. They were racing into the the valley and had passed crane flat and were well down into the stone walls and tunnel area. It was late at night and Galen accelerated and pulled out to pass Harding. All of a sudden off his right side Galen saw a huge shower of sparks from Harding's car - he'd scraped up against the stone wall. I assume Galen sped past.......
Ricardo Carlos

Ice climber
Off center
Mar 27, 2011 - 11:31pm PT
At a show Galen did in San Diego late 70s Galen told me he was stuck due to the airport and fog.
My girl friend at the time lived in Santa Barbra. She offered a ride and it way readily accepted. I was so jealous he was riding with her not me I casually asked did you get the leak in your gas tank fixed yet.
The car really did have a leak that was poorly fixed.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 28, 2011 - 01:14pm PT
Round round, get around, he got around...
John Morton

climber
Mar 28, 2011 - 05:04pm PT
My first Galen sighting might have been when his mom was my brother's cello teacher in early fifties. I didn't know him, he went to a different elementary school.

But the notorious Scott Walker went to my school, and I can tell you he was a phenomenal hellraiser before the age of ten. He was so outrageous that I sort of looked up to him, in a way. My parents told me that under no circumstances was I to play with Scott Walker. Roper was a contemporary of Walker at that school, he probably has some stories. Rowell and Walker would have met up in junior high, and never looked back.

Galen as driver: I agree with some others that he probably did have great skill but also a bad temper coupled with a lack of caution. He offered me a ride home from Indian Rock one day, and accelerated around the corner of Indian Rock Ave. to find a fire engine blocking the street. Barely slowing, he drove right up to the truck and plowed up onto the sidewalk to get around.

Another tidbit: someone (little Joe? or maybe Andy Lichtman) told me about riding down towards El Portal with Galen. He stopped to go around and open the little window that covers the rear license plate on a Corvette. There was a stack of plates in there, and he shuffled through to find and install the one that matched his park pass.
Sam R

climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 28, 2011 - 06:33pm PT
Yeah, Warbler, I heard that same story from him. He said he even had time to spread a picnic blanket out on the ground! He sure was some storyteller!
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Mar 28, 2011 - 09:41pm PT
Warbler, C-mac and I did that run with Galen in '99, from Agnew to TM. At 59 years old he was bummed that it had taken over 7 hours, as he'd done it in just over 5 in '87.
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Mar 28, 2011 - 11:44pm PT
Haha, too funny. Thats a heck of a run. I remember laughing as we passed a horse train, crashing through the woods in Lyell Canyon, toes cramped into my arches, and a rider yells, "Where'd you run from?" GR flashes a sideways smile and slurs "Agnew Meadows." The guys face goes white and he says "we left there three days ago..." Galen loved that kind of thing. He took a terrible fall a few minutes up the trail when he tripped on a root.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 29, 2011 - 12:07am PT
Yo Morton-love the switching of the plate story at the entrance station but that is the first I have heard of it. But on another level..............................

Walker was a bad dude but man could he and Galen attract the ladies. On occasion we used the two of them as chum! You know with the Checkered Demon and his gang hiding in the bushes.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 3, 2011 - 01:03pm PT
Shoulda started a charm school---The Lucky Chum Academy!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 3, 2011 - 02:21pm PT
Surely Steve Roper is around somewhere, and can be nudged to add to this?
crunch

Social climber
CO
Apr 3, 2011 - 10:23pm PT
I stopped in at the Galen Rowell gallery in Bishop a couple weeks ago. aside form the amazing photos, the place is somewhat like a church or something; silent, reverential, expensive. One speaks in hushed tones.

Which makes reading this priceless thread of fantastic tales all the better; an icon of climbing photography made into a real human being; warts and all.

Thanks Peter!

Yeti

Trad climber
Ketchum, Idaho
Apr 5, 2011 - 07:36pm PT
Galen was not interested in small planes except as a handy means of getting around. His wife Barbara was the pilot and she learned to fly with the same passion she brought to everything in her life, which, of course, was a match for Galen's.
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Apr 6, 2011 - 09:04am PT
Well, a mixed topic of skinned bears, errant NPS rangers, and Garden Trowel (Doug's nickname for him, not mine).

I only briefly met Galen and Barbara in the late-1970s when I was on road patrol on Tioga. It was a nice chat, and though as a climber I was impressed to be chatting it up with Galen, I found Barbara to have a very enticing aura.

I can attest first-hand that when I was an NPS ranger in Yosemite there were rangers I worked with who hunted in off-season in Yosemite's back-country. I was appalled when I was once invited to join in. Burst my bubble.

But there were other bubble bursters. My immediate supervisor once showed me the scam that he and his little clique of fellow rangers were running, and I was invited to join in, but declined, which put me on their black list. They would take the entrance fee at the kiosks, but not give every other driver the little green receipt unless the driver knew better and asked for it. Then they'd "sell" the receipt to the next driver and pocket that fee. On a shift mid-summer each ranger involved in that fraud was pocketing hundreds of tax-free dollars per day. Myself and one woman ranger I worked with who also refused to get involved would just watch these other rangers raking in the bucks. We thought about blowing the whistle but when one works with fellow employees who are armed and the surroundings are a rugged mountain wilderness where "things" can easily disappear, you just keep your mouth shut.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Apr 6, 2011 - 05:41pm PT
I remember a time in the mid 60s when there was a sting operation set up at Arch Rock entrance station to catch said rangers pocketing the funds. Pretty dumb to involve yourself with a federal offense for mere pocket change.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
May 7, 2011 - 01:46pm PT
Best Garage Bump in the World...
frog-e

Trad climber
Imperial Beach California
May 7, 2011 - 02:01pm PT
The last time I saw Galen Rowell, he was pulling out of
the REI parking lot in Berkeley. He saw me on my bike
riding past, recognized me, smiled and waved.

I was amazed he remebered me, after only seeing
him once briefly in the C4 parking lot.

This is such a great thread. What a cool guy. The freaking
AC Cobra must've been awesome.

rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
May 7, 2011 - 02:06pm PT
Small world...my friend Brent was giving Mrs. Rowell flying lessons....
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
May 8, 2011 - 01:10am PT
Spent some time flying with Brent and Barbara. Cool Guy.
Rick Sylvester

Trad climber
Squaw Valley, California
May 8, 2011 - 04:45am PT
In the company of Chris Vandiver -- now there's another subject to launch scores of postings! -- I once visited Galen at his San Pablo garage and later at his Albany home when he was married to his first wife. She was very gracious...and also very large. I got odd feelings, like he had a secret or double life, His wife did not look, at least then , like anyone that such an outdoors activist would be hooked up with.
Re. the entrance station pocketing fees scam, which I'm amazed to learn of for the first time, it bears striking similarities, from what I've heard, to film exhibition. The idea was that the distributor supplying the theater exhibitor rolls of numbered tickets in the rolls would prevent this type of fraud. But unless the patron witnessed the ticket taker at the door tearing in half the ticket there was no guarantee that the ticket wasn't resold at the kiosk and money pocketed, money that was meant to be shared with the distributor (who then was supposed to split with the production company personnel, actors, investors, et al.). I'd heard that the only way to avoid such fraud was for distributors to independently hire people equipped with clickers who'd stand outside the theater counting the number of patrons entering the theaters to insure the count that was given them was accurate. And it's said this is why the film business is filled with crooks, because each level, fearing, -- often rightfully so -- that it was being screwed would screw the next level (check out Cliff Robertson's autobiography. He, like only a few other actors at great risk of being blackballed, stood up against the system). Robertson and others claimed that the film business defined gross as other businesses defined net. There were other tricks too as I once heard Colin Higgins, director of, among other films, the wonderful cult classic "Harold and Maude", for which he never got a cent of hi scontractual net profit share. Hugely popular films such as "Harold and Maude" somehow ended up showing no net profit, and therefore there was li nothing for actors and others who had contracts entitling them to a share of the net profit. Unless they were to get a share of gross profit, virtually impossible to secure then (I believe things have improved) forget it. That accounts for the classic line, "The most creative thing in Hollywood is the accounting". And now I learn that the national park service engages, or engaged, in similar fraud though on more of an individual than an institutional level. I don't even want to think about the rangers regularly hunting within national park boundaries, another revelation. Human nature being what it is, especially by those in positions of authority, maybe I shouldn't be so shocked and surprised, including by my own naivete.
Re. Galen's penchant for scaring his passengers by making eye contact with them, he had nothing on Chuck Ostin (another fertile goldfield for postings not to mention one of the finest people I've had the pleasure to have known in this incarnation. He left us way way too soon). Chuck, ever so polite, actually was careful while driving to make eye contact with passengers not just beside him but in the rear seat of his Mercedes, thus scaring the crap out of me and other unfortunates to be sharing rides with him. It was terrifying. And it seemed he'd been involved in more than an average amount of crashes. But according to Chuck, such a truly great and generous human being, so intelligent, but perhaps a bit lacking in self-awareness here, those accidents were somehow always the other drivers' fault.
One time we were driving to the Wind Rivers (due to time constraints we spent more time commuting to and fro than at our climbing destination). Unlike Galen he allowed others to share the driving but vigorously urged keeping the speedometer above 100. Actually, I'm now finding this anarchy somewhat refreshing in a seeming increasingly politically correct, overly sanitized, overly regulated (no, not re. the financial world, the airline industry, clean water and air, safe food, et al.), a seeming increasingly timid culture where one's looked at askance if one's not wearing a helmet on a flat one mile bike ride to the post office (I won't even enter into skiing and climbing issues here), if one's not carrying an avalanche beacon in the low Sierras when it hasn't snowed in a month and there's a hard pack barely penetrable via ice axe, if one doesn't have available hydration via fanny pack or Camelback despite being out for only 10 ks at the local nordic center, etc etc etc. I'd prefer a lot more of the spirit of Loretan -- now, sadly departed, who supposedly carried only something like 8 ounces of water up Everest on his summit day which he ended up also carrying down never having touched it - or the great silent film comedian Harold Lloyd as exemplified by the title of one of his two most famous films, "Safety Last". Sorry. I'll dismount my soap box.
One last thing. Ages ago, Chuck, despite being very reticent to talk about himself, revealed to me which town or city he came from in the Central Valley but I've forgotten and it's been really bugging me for years. Does anyone know?
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 17, 2011 - 10:20am PT
Bumpage for The Chevrolet: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2011/07/17/automobiles/collectibles/17chevy-slideshow.html
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 31, 2012 - 10:23pm PT
Juan Diver, the Mexican from Acapulco? The one who got pulled off the Nose like a scab? The mutt that still has my Jumars?

I hope he got rescued from the boulder route at Cragmont where he stuck his hand in the crack and couldn't get it back. They got a shot of it in a TNF catalog from '84 or so.

Perrro!

lol, CV.

Who you callin' brutal?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 31, 2012 - 10:54pm PT
I came here to comment on the mind-blowing fact (to me) that Galen's business was in my neighborhood, which was on 5th ST. and Gilman, probably not more than two long par fives apart. Beginning in 1977, I began commuting from El Sobrante to Berkeley on my Italian racing bike that I picked up from Bruce Hamilton at TNF. I had been corrupting him with fishing trips and I got a super deal on it. Nine in, nine out, for 3 and a half years. I was in top shape. I must have ridden past that building hundred of times in ignorance of its existence there.

Since I never knew this garage was located where it was, it may be that it shut down by the time I opened the Factory Outlet for business in '75. This may explain why I never knew it was there. It had lodged in my mind that it was located much farther down San Pablo, more in Emeryville or even Oakland. (It must have been Millis that planted that idea.)

No matter. I knew he was a Chevy FREAK and we had little in common other than climbing. He was an ace, a pro with a lens and with a wrench.
I hate working on cars and don't understand them so well so I hate them for that and other reasons; and I lost my baby's birth pictures when the kiosk on Gilman and San Pablo was robbed and my 110 film ended in some Berkeley dumpster.

He put up Stone Groove. I could never even follow it.
He drove a four on the floor. I rode an 18-speed.
He used up a lot of gas. I made up for it.

Some men are born to be wild men. He tempered that wildness with the creative pursuits of writing and photography, while taking the opposite tack with his climbing and muscular approach to transportation.

His was on of the most well-balanced lives of any climber I have known.

What is weird about today is that for the second time in a very short span of hours, I have learned two things I thought were true concerning Galen were in fact not. One is the location of his business. The other was that the Fuller Buttes are in SoYo, not Lassen.

The tales of a legend who left waaay too soon. (Je mousecuse, Rick. I just noted your comment on Chuck Ostin. I added some a's. Plagiarism ismy waaay.)
The shot of a climber on Thank God Ledge.
The fond remembrance of the day at the base of El Cap.
The sound of a '57 Chevy breaking it loose.
California dreaming.

I have been a dedicated listener of classical music since 1998 and was pleased to hear that Galen's mother was a concert cellist. Too cool, Pablo.

I am making a special request to Steve Grossman, if you will oblige me, again. The picture Galen took of the Mouse in Vertical World, could you put it up here? Please. I want to show my knickers. Moby Dick chimney.
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 1, 2012 - 12:31am PT
Given that Peter started this and it's about Galen, I'm re-posting my photo of those two at Indian rock around '71.


apropos Rick's post: Chris Vandiver, if you're lurking out there, we're not far from each other.
NicoleRowellRyan

Social climber
Plymouth, CA
Aug 22, 2016 - 01:26pm PT
Love seeing this thread about my dad's old garage. A few comments and corrections.
1. The Santana link. Rowell Auto Service had a mechanic named Walter Herbert. Walter's son was Herbie Herbert, Santana's manager and later Journey's manager. Herbie bought the biz for his father from my dad in 1971 or so.
2. The 1955 Black Nomad station wagon. It has recently been brought back to Berkeley, CA...purchased by a close friend of the family...complete with my dad's receipts in the glove compartment.
3. The 10 month pregnant mom. Yes, my mother Carol was a month overdue with my brother and did have to have a c section. My brother Tony Rowell has just recently published his own book of astrophotography. https://www.amazon.com/Sierra-Starlight-Astrophotography-Tony-Rowell/dp/1597143138

He also has some astronomy time lapse videos that are being used in movies, tv and ads.
http://www.tonyrowell.com/
http://www.astronomytimelapse.com/

Thanks for the stories and pics.
Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Aug 22, 2016 - 01:43pm PT
The power of the Taco! great thread, thanks for the update Nicole.
telemon01

Trad climber
Montana
Aug 22, 2016 - 03:43pm PT
Best taco thread I've seen in years! Missed it first time around
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 22, 2016 - 05:04pm PT
Thanks for posting these wonderful TR time-lapse videos. Impressive work.

And here I thought Herbie was a VW bug. Thanks for clearing THAT up! :0)
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Aug 22, 2016 - 05:18pm PT
If I remember correctly, Scot Walker's mom was head of the DMV office in Berkeley. More stories about this side of the picture but I must again check the statute of limitation criteria for the good State of California.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jan 14, 2018 - 07:33pm PT
Bumper bump.
Albany Hill in background.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jan 15, 2018 - 06:53am PT
Nice addition, Mouse!
Bad Climber

Trad climber
The Lawless Border Regions
Jan 15, 2018 - 07:03am PT
Great stuff! I don't know if it's been mentioned elsewhere, but the Mountain Light Gallery here in Bishop has closed its doors--the end of an era. Made me sad to see it go. I only met the great man a few times at AAC meetings decades ago when I was a very youthful member, but I did have another tangential connection: My first love was a very serious cellist and took lessons for years from Rowell's mom.

BAd
Don Lauria

Trad climber
Bishop, CA
Jan 15, 2018 - 12:55pm PT
Met Galen in Camp 4 sometime in the early 60s. Never got to climb with him, but spent a lot of time at Camp 4 tables with him.

One day in the late 60s in Camp 4, just after I had read Galen’s first Summit article “with photos by Rowell”, Galen came running up to me and excitedly, his camera swinging wildly from its strap around his neck, and asked if I had seen the article. Yes, I had read it. What did I think? I thought it was great. He then announced that he’d made a life changing decision. He was going to henceforth devote his energies (he had energies) to writing and photography. I previously had a story printed in Summit so with that in common our friendship was now firmly established.

Later, in the early 70s at the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley during that year’s annual American Alpine Club banquet, Galen and I were conversing in the lobby. In the course of our chat he mentioned he was going to be running in the hills in the morning, “would I like to go?” Sure. I was into running then and had been in a couple of marathons, so I was delighted to be invited.

Next morning at 4:30 am we met in the lobby and Galen led me out the door and into the Berkeley hills. It was probably the most difficult course I’d ever been exposed to … steep and then more steep. An hour and a half later I managed to drag myself back to my room and collapse. I’m sure Galen was still trotting in place somewhere outside. Again, a man of great energies.

When he and Barbara moved to Bishop and opened Mountain Light Gallery in 2001, I spent some time with him, helped move some furniture into the gallery and visited him in his beautiful new Bishop residence. I expected to see more of my new neighbor over the years, but while on a river trip on the Salmon with Guido in August of 2002, we learned of the plane crash.

In October of 2003, Galen’s son, Tony, contacted me and asked if I would accompany him on an ascent of the Mountaineer’s Route on Mt. Whitney. He explained that he and Galen had started a winter ascent a few years back and had been turned back by the weather. In Galen’s memory, Tony wanted to finish the climb he and his father had begun. Tony was just beginning his venture into professional photography and brought his camera along. I have a photo hanging in my living room fhat Tony took of me that October at the base of Whitney at sunrise. Tony has since gone on to become an award–winning astrophotographer.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 15, 2018 - 12:58pm PT
Do you have a picture of El Bravo, Don?
Larry Nelson

Social climber
Jan 16, 2018 - 08:17am PT
Bump for one of the best threads on the Taco.
John Morton

climber
Jan 16, 2018 - 09:41am PT
Apropos of Don Lauria's mention of the Claremont Hotel, I recall being recruited to join Dozier in rappelling the tower, perhaps 1964. This was in connection with some kind of winter fair. Descending before us was Galen, who I think had set up the gig and took the opportunity to do some route finding amongst the tower roof pitches. Galen rappelled while carrying a cocktail, which he served to someone through a window.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Jan 16, 2018 - 06:48pm PT
Kalimon

Social climber
Ridgway, CO
Jan 16, 2018 - 07:46pm PT
I had bailed from the taco but you all deserve so much thanks and love for the marvelous Galen stories! Thank you all for sharing these incredibly timeless memories . . . you all had some good times.


Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jan 17, 2018 - 01:11am PT
Chris Jones wrote:
His father was, as I recall, a professor of rhetoric at Cal.
This is correct.
Below is his father's obit from 1975.
He retired from teaching in 1953 at age 68; Galen would have been age 13 at the time.
http://texts.cdlib.org/view?docId=hb4q2nb2nd;NAAN=13030&doc.view=frames&chunk.id=div00058&toc.depth=1&toc.id=&brand=calisphere
Edward Z. Rowell, Speech: Berkeley

1885-1975
Professor Emeritus
Edward Z. Rowell, our esteemed colleague and friend, was born in Silver Lake, Minnesota on September 3, 1885, of Moravian parentage. He took the Ph.B. at the University of Chicago, and the M.A. and Ph.D. (cum laude) at the University of Chicago--the higher degree being awarded in 1922. After a year as assistant professor of philosophy at Carleton College, he returned to the University of Chicago. It was there, during his first year, that a telegram arrived from President Robert Gordon Sproul to the President of the University of Chicago. It read, “I want a man trained in the philosophies who can teach my students to think.” Rowell was the first person to whom the President of Chicago showed the telegram. From that time on Ed's entire career was spent in the speech department of the Berkeley campus. He retired in June 1953, beloved by his colleagues, who honored him with a party that will always live in the hearts of those attending as the most heartfelt ever given in the department.

This latter fact is not accidental. Ed had the remarkable ability to hold the respect and friendship of the entire membership of the department. This feat was all the more remarkable as Ed was neither a pliant nor indifferent man. His philosophic training was thorough, his gentle manner deceptive, for although Ed never raised his voice nor quickened his soft, deliberate--even careful--manner of speaking, many a student and colleague discovered that there was a powerful and critical mind behind the gentleness, and not one to be underestimated. He was, on the other hand, ever supportive of intelligence and sensitivity. To young faculty members whom he deemed worthy he offered steady support, offering generously of his time as counselor and mentor. Though his style was always quiet and his stance that of understatement, he was a gifted storyteller and wit, and as a speaker was much in demand, particularly within the Unitarian Church and the Humanist movement.

His first marriage, to Alice Marion Rowell, ended in her death in 1931. His second marriage, to Margaret Avery Rowell, was, despite the fifteen years difference in their ages, one of the most felicitous we have witnessed.

― 151 ―
The many interests they shared included a profound love of nature, and they went each summer for long hiking expeditions in the Sierra and, during the rest of the year, through the woodlands of the Bay Area. Herself a woman of great talent as a musician and teacher of the cello, Margaret was to Ed a warm and loyal partner, held by all of us in high regard in her own right.
As a scholar, Ed is best remembered for his four-part monograph entitled Prolegomena to Argumentation, considered a major contribution to rhetorical theory and long used as a central oeuvre in graduate courses around the country. During the last twenty years of his active professorship, he was troubled by glaucoma and, ultimately, cataracts, all of which limited his scholarly activity. As a result, his energy was devoted to teaching. His colleague and office mate for twenty-two years, Alan R. Thompson, has left a written testimony to that devotion.

He gives his time and energy to his teaching because he loves to teach. It is a cliche to say that a professor loves to teach, and too often the cliche says more than the truth. Many of us do our duty, but our deepest interests are elsewhere, perhaps in our research. Applied to Ed Rowell the cliche is strictly true. In advising the students in his own classes he has been far more generous of his time than most of us. He helps his students with problems of emotional adjustment. His tact and kindliness here are admirable. He maintains warm social relations with many present and former students. Graduates often drop in to see him. Their attitude shows how highly they regard him.
It should be noted that, although Ed died more than twenty years after his retirement, former students attended his memorial service and spoke of their love for, and devotion to him.

Each member of this committee and all his friends and family will always carry the memory of this grave, gentle man with the cool mind and twinkling eye, in many respects the very model of the humane professor of the humanities.

Ed Rowell died on May 4, 1975. He is survived by his wife Margaret, their child Galen Avery Rowell and his two children Nicole and Edward Anthony, and by the daughter of his first marriage, Anne Rowell Morehead, and her three children, Alice Morehead Cheek, Ruth Morehead Flanigan, and John, and one great granddaughter, Gail Anne Cheek.

Robert L. Beloof Ward Tabler Garff B. Wilson
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jan 17, 2018 - 02:02am PT
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00335633409380050?journalCode=rqjs20

Accessible online for 24 hrs at $42.00.

Too rich for my blood.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 17, 2018 - 02:20pm PT
Nice post Joe!

Thanks for the background Clint.
Pete_N

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Jan 17, 2018 - 04:00pm PT
mouse (or anyone else for that matter): let me know if you want a pdf of the E Rowell paper you link to. I'd have to email it, but it's no problem

Pete
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Jan 17, 2018 - 04:22pm PT
Steve-We put that together for Harper's exit from planet earth several summers ago. He was one of the great ones and sadly missed by many as was Galen........
Gnome Ofthe Diabase

climber
Out Of Bed
Jan 17, 2018 - 11:52pm PT
Thank you all for this one
&
this link fits too I think

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1261259/Galen-Rowells-1-000-Mile-Sierra-Weekend-Climbing-1970
wayne burleson

climber
Amherst, MA
Jan 18, 2018 - 04:12pm PT
Incredible thread! So rich with people and stories...
zBrown

Ice climber
Apr 5, 2018 - 08:50pm PT
Mad no, not at all

I missed this one too



Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jul 21, 2018 - 07:09pm PT
Berkeley bump
zBrown

Ice climber
May 21, 2019 - 06:35pm PT
Take Two.

Berkeley and Nomads

Gotta copy this one


Nomads from the fifties, Chula Vista

jeff constine

Trad climber
Ao Namao
May 22, 2019 - 07:28pm PT
RADx2
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