Politics, God and Religion vs. Science

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 15761 - 15780 of total 22589 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Aug 10, 2013 - 02:27pm PT
Oh my, im so very sorry mikeL.. i'll be praying
Our heavenly Father is always listening and tending to our needs
This i know
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Aug 10, 2013 - 04:05pm PT
I'm so sorry to hear this, Mike. I hope she pulls out of this OK.

My own wife fell at the bottom of the stairs recently, but is just sore. Very lucky.

Keep us informed.
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Aug 11, 2013 - 01:46am PT
^^^^^thats very simaliar! What are the odds?

Think'in and pray'in for you again MikeL. Like I had so many times today..
The hearing of your experience resonated deeper than the cloud of third person, second ego
bickering going ononon here. I bet it all seems kinda silly from ur standpoint? Partly?

I hope ur better-half is progressing well!!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Aug 11, 2013 - 03:42am PT
MikeL

My best wishes for the evolving recovery of your wife. The traumas evolving like they should do, is a good sign. I'm glad to hear you're in a great trauma unit. The best trauma units are extremely competent these days.
MikeL

climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Aug 11, 2013 - 02:06pm PT
Thanks everyone for the good wishes. They helped, at least me anyways. :-)

My wife's condition turned around in the last 18 hours. Her worst problems now are dizziness when she moves too quickly and nausea. (Both obviously associated.) The doctors have moved her out of the ICU and into a regular room. Most importantly, my wife now knows my and everyone else's name, initiates conversations, knows who the president is, the day of the week, and can explain how the U.S. healthcare program is going to work (just kidding). She's eating soft food and sitting up.

Tiredness has hit me like a freight train.

Thanks John, Norton, and DMT for the PMs.

Trippy stuff, this. After so many decades of mind training, I tend to think that I have achieved something or gotten somewhere. Maybe I have, but my regular experience still has the flavor of delusion compared to a catastrophe or trauma like this hitting me upside the head like a 2x4--when the ground is pulled out from under me. It's sort of like falling. It was like falling for the both of us. Nothing to hold on to. The experience is total.

As odd as it seems to say, I think these kinds of events are useful things in life. (Of course, that's MY mind and orientation.)

Booyah!
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Aug 11, 2013 - 02:17pm PT
It sounds good now. Head injuries are the worst. I've talked a few times on this thread about my friend who survived a massive stroke. His aphasia is still a big problem unless you have learned to speak "Matt."

Glad to hear that her faculties are coming back. Even with that severe stroke of my friend, you could see how flexible the brain is at bringing back function when areas have been damaged. It sounds like her injuries are already healing right back. These are all good signs.

Give her a peck from Herndie, eh?
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Aug 11, 2013 - 03:00pm PT
Great news MikeL.

DMT
cintune

climber
The Utility Muffin Research Kitchen
Aug 11, 2013 - 04:43pm PT
Missed the bad news by a few days but for what it's worth, glad things are looking up, Mike. I'm sure you both have the fortitude to get through and past this. Marriage is a moving meditation, eh? Best wishes and regards.
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Aug 12, 2013 - 11:39pm PT
Send some fine thougts over to our friend Blitzo who is moving on as we speak.

JL
MikeL

climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Aug 13, 2013 - 05:41pm PT
My wife is back home finally. She returned once but I took her back to hospital due to high agitation and some, . . er, "vivid hallucinations" that she was experiencing at night while she was supposed to be sleeping. (Don't know what the heck that was.) Now she's back home, in more ways than one.

2 hours before release from the hospital.
2 hours before release from the hospital.
Credit: MikeL

It was quite the adventure. For the first 24-36 hours, she was in a lot of head pain and confusion. She kept waking and saying, "Michael, what's wrong with me?" The doctors and I would tell her about the hemorraging in three places and the fractures behind her ear and at C2, where she was, and who we were, but none of that helped her, and she'd only forget and remain confused. She'd wake up whispering, "Michael, my head Really Hurts," and the staff kept experimenting with pain killers (morphine, dilaudin, fentanyl, tylenol infusions, etc.) until they finally found the right combination to bring her pain down from a "9" to a "6." Before then, I'd put a cool hand to her head and comb her hair with my fingers, and she'd tell me that it helped a lot, and she'd fall off into sleep for a while.

My training has been to make observations and notice things. What I noticed was that no explanation helped my wife's condition. The doctors (all purportedly very competent) were figuring it out as they went along, and they did good. But it took a little while to come upon the right combination of drugs and the meanings of the tests. It was a successive series of approximations. But a cool hand running through my wife's hair made a noticeable difference in her experience. Experience vs. explanation? Open-endedness vs. uncertainty.? Science vs. intuition?

At the moment, my wife tells me she's not back. She says she's not quite really here, and she wonders if she will be by the time she needs to return to her job (senior manager at a tech company).

I have a gentle smile for her. ("Like, who the frick cares?")

What's happening now? What did happen? After a beer late one night, my wife went down to the ground floor with her socks on to have a fag in the garage, slipped on one of the higher steps of a hardwood staircase, and fell down about 8'-10' to a landing. You can almost see it in your mind's eye in slow motion. The foot slips, her feet splay forward in the air while her upper neck comes down onto the edge of the step, and she crumples down the 8-10 more steps until she lands feet pointed up on the bottom steps of the staircase. I find her breathing labored.

What caused the effects? The beer? The socks? The slippery floor? The wont for a cigarette? Karma? Mental multi-tasking (you need to know my wife)? All of it? None of it?

Who can say?

Will there be any long-term effects like hearing loss, loss of memory, loss of the piano lessons, loss of movement, fear of stairs, a change in mental capacities, a change in attitude, or some little physical issue that has gone so far undetected? Could the unfinished re-integration back into "regular life" be the beginning of a new (spiritual?) outlook on life?

Who can say?

Odd as it is to say, the smile I see now on my wife's face is unlike any I've seen before. (Probably temporary, hmmm?) I look at the image above, and I see an enigma. She looks blank but centered to me. How interesting.

Initially, years ago, I began to notice such curiosities (above) that I could not explain or answer. I found them deeply interesting. Now I expect them.

I'm glad that she's returned. It's interesting. (I suppose it sounds strange for me to say.)
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Aug 13, 2013 - 06:11pm PT
That's one hell of a shiner. There's fantastic things going on in those eyes!

JL
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Aug 13, 2013 - 06:22pm PT
There's fantastic things going on in those eyes!

MikeL :
Largo is guessing as usual but this time it's a guess that is right-on.
I know this because I thought the same thing.

Your wife loves you. It's love that'll get the both of you through these setbacks.
You can quote me on that.

Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Aug 13, 2013 - 08:16pm PT
Largo is guessing as usual but this time it's a guess that is right-on.
I know this because I thought the same thing.


When Ward guesses, as he did above, then we are assured of said guess being right because, errrrrrr, Ward said it.

Or do I have that wrong, LOL???

Yo the man, Mike. But I like the Misses more. My oldest daugher has a little of that magic in her eyes as well. She leaves me in the dust. Always has.

JL

Dr. Long
Dr. Long
Credit: Largo

Credit: Largo
MH2

climber
Aug 13, 2013 - 10:56pm PT
What I see in the eyes of MikeL's wife is a strange mix of the wisdom of age with the innocence of youth that I have sometimes seen in the eyes of our so-called confused old people in the nursing home. It is beautiful.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Aug 14, 2013 - 12:09am PT
Thanks for posting MikeL.

DMT
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Aug 14, 2013 - 10:33pm PT
A weird tribe of inbred desert rats who take care of their own with lots of love and a little drama

Hey, DMT, what's happening?

At face value I'm kinda a little puzzled by this comment, made by yourself, in its context on another current thread.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=2091898&tn=1540

Is there something I'm missing here?
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Aug 15, 2013 - 02:27pm PT
Nice photos, JL. You must be very proud of her!


;>)
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Aug 15, 2013 - 03:25pm PT
I'm just tuning into the world again and discover Mike's wife in the hospital and Blitzo in a hospice.Truly there is only now. Best wishes Mike, and I will be meditating for you both. My traumas with four dogs and cat across the Pacific are as nothing now that we're all recovered. Hopefully I'll get connected at home and have more time to post today or tomorrow. I missed the thread and the gang these past couple of weeks.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Aug 21, 2013 - 12:16am PT
haven't been on this thread for a while...such pain and loss to process...

and yet:

'Regardless of what you call it, the fact is we have measured the emptiness of space as not empty at all, yet in the standard model they simply sweep this number under the rug using a mathematical trick called "renormalization" and then proceed about their business writing their field equations as if it was not significant despite the fact that the measured value of the energy present in a cubic centimeter of space is 39 orders of magnitude denser than all of the regular matter of the entire universe squashed into a cubic centimeter! No wonder they are unable to find this mysterious "dark matter". They can't find it like a fish can't find water because we are bathing in and made of an infinitely dense super-fluid medium we call space that happens to appear to us as "nothing" because its in a perfect state of balanced equilibrium due to the perfect scalar geometry of the space itself! Scalar cube octahedrons that Buckminster Fuller called the vector equilibrium created by an infinite tetrahedral array.
The Resonance Project • Nassim Haramein.'


COSMOLOGIST SUGGESTS THAT THE UNIVERSE-EXPANSION THEORY IS INCORRECT

After the revolutionary discovery (by Edwin Hubble in 1929) of the strong correlation between the redshift of galaxies and their distances from us, astrophysicists have agreed for many decades that the universe has been expanding ever since the Big Bang.

Cosmologist Christof Wetterich of the University of Heidelberg boldly suggests an alternative explanation. He claims that rather than an expanding universe, the redshift of galaxies observed on Earth could have been caused by less massive particles of the early universe.

The idea revolves around the mass of particles in the beginning of time. If an atom were to become larger in mass, the light it emits would become more energetic and higher in frequency, corresponding to a blue shift. Conversely, a lighter atom would emit less energetic light with a lower frequency, corresponding to a redshift. If the mass of all particles were once lower (and constantly increasing ever since), the redshift differential of distant galaxies would be proportional to their distance from Earth. If this were true, the “expanding universe” would merely be an illusion.

Unfortunately, testing Wetterich’s hypothesis is not possible. As the mass of all particles increase, so does the standard scale which we use for measurement. In other words, the mass of an object can only be measured relative to something else.

The author of the Nature article, Jon Cartwright, explains it nicely:
"[Every] mass on Earth is ultimately determined relative to a kilogram standard that sits in a vault on the outskirts of Paris ... If the mass of everything — including the official kilogramme — has been growing proportionally over time, there could be no way to find out."

Wetterich’s paper is submitted to arxiv.org and has not yet been peer-reviewed. Some experts say that his interpretation can help prevent cosmologists from becoming ingrained into one way of thinking. As physicist Arjun Berera at the University of Edinburgh, UK, puts it: “The field of cosmology these days is converging on a standard model, centred around inflation and the Big Bang… This is why it’s as important as ever, before we get too comfortable, to see if there are alternative explanations consistent with all known observation.”

Refer to the source links below for more information.

Source Links:
http://bit.ly/13xUlWK [Nature article]
http://bit.ly/13LcKKz [Arxiv.org paper]

BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Aug 21, 2013 - 12:38am PT
^^^ same thing as the evolutionist not knowing consciousness created formed matter
Messages 15761 - 15780 of total 22589 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Trip Report and Articles
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews