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wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Original Post - Dec 9, 2010 - 01:01pm PT
I thought this thread could be a channel where people can show off their cool homemade/DIY stuff to inspire the rest of us with a passion for the vertical but without fat wallets..

Being a climber from Sweden and mostly going to Norway for the vertical adventures I need to be ready for a swift change of weather. Hence I choose to go on lead with a small pack for storm gear. After getting into aid I found my harness gearloops crowded with haulline, jumars and aiders. I started looking at gearslings and I really digged the metolius gearsling carrying water in a camelback fashion. But what about the stormgear and lunch sandwich? Enough said, I put together my own climbing pack/watertank/gearsling.

Sounds interesting?

What you need is a small climbing backpack with camelbak feature, 2 meters of 6mm cord, 1 m of aquarium tube and 4 small quicklinks.

photo not found
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Cut the cord and tube in half. Thread the tubes over the pieces of cord and tie the 4 quicklinks on with figure eight knots.

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Missing photo ID#181321
Put it on the pack, tighten the quicklinks and it's done.

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Missing photo ID#181323
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I have yet to test it in the field, it's supposed to be used for long free climbing and/or easy to moderate clean aid climbs.

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Missing photo ID#181328

Please, let me know what do you guys think, hit or miss? Success or failure?

Over and out!

Mikko
WBraun

climber
Dec 9, 2010 - 01:04pm PT
The minute you need to get in a tight chimney with your new homemade rig above you're hosed ....
Silver

Big Wall climber
Nor Nev
Dec 9, 2010 - 01:06pm PT
looks pretty sweet to me.

Werner has a point there. No chimneys for you with that on but I could see it for many other uses.
matty

Trad climber
los arbor
Dec 9, 2010 - 01:07pm PT
Looks cool, could be nice for alpine. Thanks for sharing
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
CALIENTE!
Dec 9, 2010 - 01:08pm PT
(You can do chimneys too)

Looks good to me. I generally don't like clipping gear to plastic tubes of that diameter though. The thinner the better but I understand why you went this thick (I think)- don't wanna drop your rack and you could use that cord for rap anchors in a pinch, eh? But often I will get the nose or gate caught on that sticky sort of soft plastic and almost drop the piece, or fail to get it clipped back on correctly. But that's probably just my personal idiot-synchronicity showing.

The only thing I would suggest for your pack is adding a 'drop and drag' cord to the top of the pack, prior to launching up a route. The idea is when you get to a tight chimney or OW, you will already have a sling or a cord connecting the top of your pack to your harness, in a way so that when you shrug off the pack and let it go, it will hang about 6-12 inches below your feet if you were standing straight up. This way you don't risk losing your rack every time you f*#k with your pack. Capice?

Anyway, cheers!
DMT
Silver

Big Wall climber
Nor Nev
Dec 9, 2010 - 01:08pm PT
Werner what did you guys use for boom boxes and all the tube socks you carried around?
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 01:14pm PT
Yeah, I guess and could just put a double lenght runner and a krab on to keep it just below me in chimneys. I've been through that before and even though it works, it's not pretty. Or I'll just try and avoid chimneys, like the rest of us, eh?

I think it's pretty sweet clipping resistance in the aquarium tube, it's 10mm in diameter and not that soft and rubbery.
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 02:27pm PT
Nothing new under the sun but I also crafted my own belay seat (bosun's or boatswain's chair if you like) Mostly because it's good fun and the plastic/textile one from Petzl comes at around 200$. A butt hammock is out of question!

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Missing photo ID#181339

A 25x50 centimeter piece of concrete workform plywood and 4 meters of 8mm cord did the trick, works like a charm! =)

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Missing photo ID#181343

Cord's crossed underneath and tied together with a double fisherman.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Dec 9, 2010 - 03:05pm PT
nice. some of the guys on bigwalls.com do some cool stuff too.

thought about doing russian aiders? i have yet to try them, but since there are so few out in the wild, I've put my hopes away of trying them.

wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 03:22pm PT
Yeah, I've been thinking about russian aiders after having noticed that their users swear by them but the idea of tieing hooks to my knees feels really weird. I bet it works just fine but to the price of having hooks on your knees..? =) Then I just don't know.

I'll check that site out though, bigwalls.com, gotta love your DIY! Right?

Thanks!
OlympicMtnBoy

climber
Seattle
Dec 9, 2010 - 03:30pm PT
Nice work, I think your pack/gear sling should work just as well as some of the stuff like the Grivel Manu pack/sling. If you add a little padding to your belay seat you'll like it a lot more after sitting in it for a couple hours too.

Here are some wall bags and a mini-haul/rope bucket I made not long ago. I recycled some burly fabric from marine/industrial stuff, did some hand sewing, and used my normal home machine.

Credit: OlympicMtnBoy
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 03:39pm PT
Nice work, looks great!

Isn't it just so much more old school and hardcore if you put at least some of it together yourself??? Love it!

I did actually glue on a layer of sleeping pad on the belay seat later, after reading up on the subject online.

Also, the remains of the sleeping pad fitted my haulbag interior perfectly. And I'm good with sleeping on a 3/4 lenght pad. Sweetness!
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Dec 9, 2010 - 06:32pm PT
Holy frig! Mikko Routala?? Is that you??
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 06:43pm PT
No, sorry Dr P.

My name is Mikael Jarmland, Mikko for short and with a fínnish twang.. =)
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Dec 9, 2010 - 06:46pm PT
Ooops. Duh. Finland/Sweden. Sheesh.

Well, get yer ass down to Yosemite this year and we'll drink some beers anyway! Nice lookin' stuff.
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Dec 9, 2010 - 06:53pm PT
OMB- your normal sewing machine makes bar tacks? nice.
Brian

climber
California
Dec 9, 2010 - 06:55pm PT
Did my first solo with a lawn chair for a "ledge" after reading about how some other guys had done it. Not recommended. I'll have to look for the old slides however...
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 06:56pm PT
Cheers!
(coming from the wall doctor himself, I consider that a compliment and a half) Thanks!

Will do actually, I'll be spending at least first half of August in the valley. Then I'm meeting up with my wife and kid in San Fran and we're going road tripping in "the cradle of grunge"!

Will you be there in August? Is it crazy hot? I've only been there in October before.
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
leading the away team, but not in a red shirt!
Dec 9, 2010 - 06:58pm PT
When it gets "crazy hot", head for the Half Stone.
You will not bake. Not all the time.
There will be fleece!
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Dec 9, 2010 - 07:02pm PT
Sorry, mate - I don't get there til it cools off a bit in September. Mid-September to late-October is the best time for El Cap, but as Capt. Kirk points out, Half Dome will be a lot cooler in August, if you don't mind the slog. Check first to see what the status is on the springs up there to see if you can get water or knott.

And of course, there's always Tuolumne.
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 07:25pm PT
Thanks,

I was hoping that we'd be able to do something nice and mostly clean on el cap (like salathé or triple direct or something) and then regular NW on Half Dome aswell.

If it's to darn hot in August then we'll just do HD and free climb a bunch.

It would be sweet to use our brand new portaledge too, are there any moderate mostly clean routes that requires a ledge? Or at least that you can bring a ledge on without looking like a complete as#@&%e?
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Dec 9, 2010 - 07:33pm PT
Lots of guys bring ledges on Salathe and the Nose, in spite of there being enough natural ledges to sleep on. It affords you the ability to camp where you want and when you want, and doesn't make you look like a weenie.

Lurking Fear goes pretty much clean, but it faces straight west and can get really hot in the afternoon. Zodiac gets straight southern exposure, and goes mostly clean. If you need to nail, it shouldn't be much.

You should just plan to climb whatever route you want to climb whenever you want to do it. If it's going to be hot, plan on five litres per person per day. Bring your 2:1 hauling ratchet, and know how to use it ahead of time. Water is your ONLY defense against the heat. If it's going to be REALLY hot, plan on six litres per day for the first couple days, and then reduce it to five. Plan on climbing in the shade, and chillin' when the sun hits you. Rig up some sort of parasol for shade.

Talk to Kate aka Batgirl - she soloed Mescalito in August. I know she got up early and climbed while it was cool, then hid out under a fly until the shade hit her in the afternoon.

Do Half Dome first as it will be cooler, and the climbing will be a bit easier, though the approach will be painful. Plan on taking along enough food, water and beer to assure your success no matter how long it takes you - and it almost always takes longer than you think - then shut up and climb.

You don't want to come all the way from Svenden just to bail.
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 07:49pm PT
Nice to hear that you can bring the ledge without beeing laughed at.. I suppose when the routes are crowded it's good to be able to spread out the bivi's a litte extra.

You just now totally inspired me to not wus out because of the heat. August is what we got and our goal was to climb Half Dome AND The Captain so that's what we're going to to. In that order. And if it's hot then so be it. We'll just bring more water. Thanks again.

Mikko

"You're supposed to listen to the piton as you drive it (...) but of course, when you're soloing and you're scared, you give it a few extra whacks anyway!" -PTPP

Unforgettable!
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
leading the away team, but not in a red shirt!
Dec 9, 2010 - 08:00pm PT
Oh, you'll be laughed at, everyone gets a piece o' that. It's all good.
Have fun!

Yer gonna die fer sure up there, mate. Yowza!
;-)
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 08:11pm PT
Well Capt, good thing I live on the other side of the planet, then. Cause if "the merricans" laugh, I can just tell them to FOAD and head fer home...

Right? Yarr!

But you americans wouldn't laugh, you're likely the most polite people in the world. Slightly shallow maybe. But in a nice and friendly way, and that's what matters to me on my four weeks in California and Washington..
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
leading the away team, but not in a red shirt!
Dec 9, 2010 - 08:14pm PT
Well, we'll mostly be laughin' with ya, dig?
All Good.
The Canadians are (mostly) much more polite. Hope you have a Blast!
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 08:17pm PT
Thanks! I know we're just playing.

But, you see what I mean? How nice and friendly you put that, just there? That's damn polite! I dig it!
R.B.

Big Wall climber
Land of the Lahar
Dec 9, 2010 - 08:24pm PT
My friend, Bobbly Wobbly and myself did Mescalito in 1990 with two homemade "Portaboards". We made them out of plywood, drilled six holes, tied 5/16" webbing ... all joined into a figure 8 like single point anchor, man these things were friggin the bomb.

We could stand up on them, stack ropes on them, lay down on them, sleep on them, the were the total bomb! They are not aerodynamic, however, so you would have to weight down the bottoms on the haul or the wind could catch em like a sail and fling them up, then they would fall back down.

Bobbly on Mescalito, 1990 (Portaboard in upper left)
Bobbly on Mescalito, 1990 (Portaboard in upper left)
Credit: R.B.

I also have made duct tape haul bags by sewing on 2" tubular webbing onto a store bought canvass army duffel bag, Hand sew with a speedy sticher using dental floss for thread, then once done would wrap about 2 or 3 rolls of duct tape around the bag (after it's loaded)

Yeah it was BITD when I was in college and I had to do it on the cheap.

'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Dec 9, 2010 - 08:41pm PT
Bwah-ha-ha-ha-ha!!! I was showing that Youtube video of me soloing Native Son to some friends of my son the other night, so I know exactly where that quote comes from! It was pretty funny to see me bashing away at the pin, and not hearing the pitch change at all. I really try to avoid that sort of behaviour any more.

Unless I'm cursing Steve Grossman. "Take that, Steve Grossman!" [whack] "Heavy handed, indeed!" [whack] "You're a dickhead!" [whack] "Wings of Steel my middle-aged lard ass!" [whack] etc etc

We were amazed that the video has over 70,000 hits. And the title doesn't even mention the notorious Shower Scene.

What the hell you doin' over in Sweden, anyway? Pulling an all-nighter? Isn't the sun coming up over there yet? Hell, if you're up north somewhere, the sun might not come up at all this time of year!

P.S. ^^^ Great photo of the plywood ledge! Got any more??
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 09:05pm PT
I love those clips!

Yeah, I know it's 5.45 in the morning here. I've been up all night reading, doing crosswords puzzles, talking to you guys. Since you're canadian and not american I dare tell you that I'm at home playing with my son for another 6 months, at a 90% salary, it's every parents right by law in sweden. And I'm used to doing hard labour, rope access work every day to put me at ease. Now the energy's kind of flowing wild, can't really sleep.
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Dec 9, 2010 - 09:08pm PT
Damn, you Swedes got a good deal goin' there.

Whaddya mean I ain't a Merrican? Ah is as red, what and blue as Uncle Frickin' Sam his-self. Got me a You-Ess passport for goin' one way, and got me a Hoser passport for comin' back t'other.

At some point tomorrow [today for you] yer gonna be sorry you stayed up all night. Maybe about the time Junior starts cryin'...
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
leading the away team, but not in a red shirt!
Dec 9, 2010 - 09:09pm PT
Head directly to the BigWall board. Do not pass go. Do not collect $200.
http://www.bigwalls.net/forum2/
Luke Malatesta

Big Wall climber
Moab UT
Dec 9, 2010 - 09:20pm PT
Ive made a few things..Started doing custom work around here.

drill bag
drill bag
Credit: Luke Malatesta
drill bag

Haul Pack
Haul Pack
Credit: Luke Malatesta
Haul Pack

Ladders
Ladders
Credit: Luke Malatesta
6-step Ladders

Bolt Bag
Bolt Bag
Credit: Luke Malatesta
Bolt Bag

Haulbag
Haulbag
Credit: Luke Malatesta
Haulbag w/ removable straps

DIAD Bag Proto #2
DIAD Bag Proto #2
Credit: Luke Malatesta

Titanium Ledge
Titanium Ledge
Credit: Luke Malatesta

Most Complex project thus far, full sized titanium framed single ledge
Just over 7 lbs. Has a dyneema Ripstop bed. Made it all myself

wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2010 - 09:25pm PT
Ah, I see. The best of both worlds perhaps?

Very true, so I'm going to get me an hour or so of sleep before he wakes up.

@Luke: Insanely cool! Say what, do you own a climbing goods factory?
groundup

Trad climber
hard sayin' not knowin'
Dec 9, 2010 - 09:29pm PT
Damn Luke, that stuff looks great! ever sell any drill/bolt bags?

Bravo! it's really purrdy.
Luke Malatesta

Big Wall climber
Moab UT
Dec 9, 2010 - 09:51pm PT
Thanks!

I have sold a few, this stuff is up for grabs now. Going to have some stuff in the local shops here next season.

mucci

Trad climber
The pitch of Bagalaar above you
Dec 10, 2010 - 12:42am PT
Wild Country Biner Hook.
Wild Country Biner Hook.
Credit: mucci
Deluxe Hammock I designed and had made in thailand, with beer coozies ...
Deluxe Hammock I designed and had made in thailand, with beer coozies and clip in points. Also a thermarest pocket and rain Fly.
Credit: mucci
Exactly what I always wanted.
Exactly what I always wanted.
Credit: mucci

I am building a small ledge, got a sail repair shop to stitch my bed, very cheap. Adj daisies, the works. I am gonna give Luke a run for his titanium :)

Mucci
Luke Malatesta

Big Wall climber
Moab UT
Dec 10, 2010 - 01:07am PT
I dont a climbing goods shop. I started a little business doing custom work around town but seem to be moving in that direction. Hope to have a small product line out by next spring useing only 100% US made goods. I will post some more stuff up tomorrow. Mucci, I wanna see your ledge, stuff looks great!

I have some other cool stuff in the works...
Lovegasoline

Trad climber
Sh#t Hole, Brooklyn, NY
Dec 10, 2010 - 07:51am PT
R.B.,
What's it like carrying a 6' piece of plywood down East Ledges?

Or does it transform into a glider experiment (I've not yet seen a piece of plywood fly 3,000 ft) ... or get torched?
JBC

Trad climber
Tacoma, WA
Dec 10, 2010 - 11:29am PT
Haven't made a lot of gear myself, but here is a set of aiders I made when I first started aid climbing:

Credit: JBC

Jim
John Mac

Trad climber
Littleton, CO
Dec 10, 2010 - 11:49am PT
Luke, your stuff looks great!

Are you going to have a website for online sales?

Hopefully I can buy some items off you when my job settles down. 40 percent layoff the last few weeks.

Cheers

John

Luke Malatesta

Big Wall climber
Moab UT
Dec 10, 2010 - 02:01pm PT
I am going to have it up soon. I think it will be a good winter project.

Thanks,

Luke
Balls MaGee

climber
Dec 10, 2010 - 06:01pm PT
Luke Malatesta makes some really killer stuff. i believe he's out of UT. he's currently trying to start a business with his skill. he makes everything from portaledges and flys to bolt bags and custom stuff. check him out.
Credit: Balls MaGee
Credit: Balls MaGee
Credit: Balls MaGee

EDIT: ok, he's already posted these items. sorry for the redundancy, but a BIG bump for him anyway
Rokjox

Trad climber
Boys I'dunno
Dec 12, 2010 - 02:12pm PT
This thread was supposed to be about do-it-yourself stuff.

Instead its about anything but.

Its guys looking for dates, guys starting up companies and wanting customers, people making stuff so slick for others consumption that it has nothing to do with actual do it yourself.





So I am going to post what appears to be the first actual homemade stuff on this thread since the OP. I tried to get a little cutesy with the displaying of my old crap, and I think it failed, but really, most likely Locker will screw with it anyway, so I ain't going to spend a lot more time on it. Sorry I didn't do a better job. But this stuff was actually homemade and actually got used for yeas.


Here is a picture of some of the sh#t from the bottom of my closet box.




See that old haulsack? When I made that, there weren't too many alternatives available, and nothing I would pay all that much for, so I got a couple square yards of used indoor/outdoor carpeting and made that. Originally I didn't want anything too big, but if I had it to do over, I would have added 6" to a foot in circumference and made it a little bigger. My intention was to be one arml ength in depth, so you could get to the bottom of the sack without so much trouble. It was to be a grade 5 haulbag, not something to assist you in spending an entire summer vacationing on a route. The material was first glued together, then speedy stitched, then I added rivits. The webbing goes all the way around the bottom. and is a single length. It crosses on the bottom and is sewn into place there.

You can see that despite having been drug up several routes, thrown off El Cap Towers and otherwise misused, it only ever got a couple tiny tears. I/O Carpeting doesn't "tear" at all and wears unbelievably. I sewed many little loops around it as handhold grips and gear rack loops to help in re-racking and gave me a place to put stuff on the outside at night, kinda a wall pegboard The webbing was left loose at a couple places so you COULD use them as shoulder straps, but it wasn't comfortable. Or was it intended to be.

The top was turned down a foot and sewn that way to provide more material for wear resistance, and to protect the webbing.

I had a liner I used in it for awhile, with shoulder straps on it, and the idea was to put everything inside the liner when you were carrying it down, but that kinda fell by the wayside. Too much trouble.






The home made buttseat worked but was pretty miserable. Beat hanging for hours in a harness alone.






The aiders are NOT sewn, and so are FAR safer. They are ONE piece of webbing, and the loop knot is in the bottom, where it is out of the way. Every step is a water knot carefully tied and adjusted, and you can clip into any step without risking dying from zippering stitches. They are NOT the same length, they are a four and a five step, and the little loops at the top were for actual highstepping. WHY would you want them the same length? Just tangle and add weight.

Topsteps nowadays are about where my second steps are and I can't believe that hero steps aren't supplied now. SO MUCH distance is lost by guys too afraid to actually get into a REAL topstep. If your waist isn't WELL above the piece you are wasting your time and your partner out to abandon you. They are small because you don't want to trap your foot in them if you tip over. Older sets of aiders (of mine) had the hero steps actually laced into the knot but that provided too large a knot, and you couldn't tighten it well enough, weakening the entire aider. The knots were tied with left and right polarity so the steps fell on alternate sides.

The steps were laced through 1" tubular old cast off webbing to make the steps stiffer and hold open. If you let the tubular webbing bunch up it was even better than leaving them flat, made the steps stay open very well.

I usually kept the worlds worst hooks fixed to the top biners, you could hook your harness quickly and lean back for a fast rest, or place the aider onto a lip or whatever without hunting for a better hook much of the time. Crushed pins didn't need a biner through them, you just hooked them and moved on. That hook on the left is the original, and it was GUARANTEED to rotate, skid, slip and fail on almost any placement. No base legs and a rounded tip made it almost worthless for micro edges.

That wad of purple webbing? I usually kept a few 1/2" or thinner 6" tied loops hung around the aiders or on the aid rack; hero loops for tying off short pins, threading bent and smashed stuff, or slipping behind half pulled bolts or rivets. DON'T use a girth hitch on hero loops, girth hitches are FAT (a double strand knot) and loosen up and slip off instantly when unweighted. you tie a loop knot slip knot with one hand and put THAT on a tied off pin. It only ends up being a single strand of webbing instead of two, provides rotational torque to the pin that is selectable left or right, and does NOT loosen when unweighted. FAR superior, and EVERYONE should have their hand slapped when they tie girth hitches. You ARE Goona Die if you don't learn to stop using girth hitches.





The bongs I always rigged with runners. Not just to rack them, though it worked fine, but because I placed most of them by hand, as big-assed nuts in a day when a number 10 hex was a big deal. You could place them oriented either vertically or horizontally, and they were better as nuts than pins. As nuts they didn't expand the flakes, didn't leave huge scars and you didn't beat hell out of the soft aluminum placing and removing them.

I used to have more, but through the years, climbers left alone around my gear stole a lot of that old stuff. Some climbers are some of the worst thieves, and I don't just invite just anybody to paw through my stuff anymore.







The first two old jumars were Chuck Pratts original set, he sold them to me in Camp 4 so long ago I can't place the year, must have been the first half of the 1070's. HE sewed such nice slings on them that I never cut them off, just added another layer knotted over his work, that I have since removed. TINY machine stitches, and MANY passes. Immaculate work.

Of course the third jumar was the haul-stop jumar. A later version that never looked very sturdy to me compared to the original cast ones. It was useful as a spare if you managed to drop one too, although I never did.







BITD we actually DID make stuff OURSELVES and actually CLIMBED on it.
gf

climber
Mar 27, 2011 - 09:39pm PT
hey rock-good on ya
luke -pm me if you see this -most interested in what you are up to
OlympicMtnBoy

climber
Seattle
Mar 27, 2011 - 10:07pm PT
Re: Jerry
My home machine makes a nice zigzag stitch that if you make em close together an run a straight stitch through at the end is basically the same thing as a bar tack. It doesn't take long to do, I used those for all the potential load bearing points on my wall bags, three of them in some places. It's probably way less a real computerized bar tacker but I've tested them with body weight to see how few stitches I can get away with and I'd guess three of my fake bartack are at least 6-8 KN (+/- 6). ;-)
- OMB
Moof

Big Wall climber
Orygun
Mar 27, 2011 - 10:42pm PT
Credit: Moof

One night stand, for dogs...
One night stand, for dogs...
Credit: Moof

redone Ural Alp russian aiders
redone Ural Alp russian aiders
Credit: Moof

Not Ural Alp russian aiders
Not Ural Alp russian aiders
Credit: Moof

Ledge haul sack
Ledge haul sack
Credit: Moof

Aid trees with gear organizing widget in background
Aid trees with gear organizing widget in background
Credit: Moof
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Mar 28, 2011 - 11:14am PT

Either that's one BIG DOG, or it's a small ledge, moof!!!!!
mooch

Trad climber
Old Climbers' Home (Adopted)
Mar 28, 2011 - 12:33pm PT
Props Mucci.
wallyvirginia

Big Wall climber
Stockholm, Sweden
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 5, 2011 - 01:22am PT
BUMP for big wall DIY


Spring has finally reached us up here in the Stockholm area of Sweden, there's only a little snow left and big wall training season has begun!

We slept in the portaledge this weekend, on a small rockface half way out in the archipelago.. We were a little late so conditions were rough on us. Basically pitch black and lots of heavy fog when we finally started setting up the bivy.

Excellent practice, I suppose! =)

The backpack/camelback/gearsling seem to work just fine. I had to shorten the straps a little bit, because the gear was hanging a little low. Other than that - Perfect!

photo not found
Missing photo ID#197183
Rocman

Trad climber
Reno,NV
Apr 22, 2011 - 08:16am PT
Plastic shipping containors[ olive] make a great haul drum,with sewn or knots on harness,plywood portaledge,5/8 thick riged with webing are good for your first wall,BlackDimond prymid works as rainfly both on and off the wall,knoted aiders adjust well for us taller people who are outside manurfacture spic. 5 gal w/ lid,web tie off for storage of fruit,bread,candys attached to bottom of hauldrum, webbing taped to sunglasses [crockies] all can be collected at little or no cost[craiglist]Delis,foodstores,construction sites[ask first]I ve always got buckets at Delis,free so if Big Walls are not to your likeing,your not out big $$
Chris McNamara

SuperTopo staff member
Feb 5, 2012 - 09:57pm PT
Has anyone thought of making haulbags out of TPO cool roof fabric? I just had my roof redone with the stuff when I installed solar panels. It seems like the material could be way less expensive and easier to come by than urethane. And no stitching required: the seams can all be heat welded. Thoughts?

TPO material on my roof
TPO material on my roof
Credit: Chris McNamara

Close up of the TPO material. Feels just as burly as the urethane on Y...
Close up of the TPO material. Feels just as burly as the urethane on Yates haulbags or Durethane on Metolius Haul Bags.
Credit: Chris McNamara
Jonnnyyyzzz

Trad climber
San Diego,CA
Feb 6, 2012 - 05:24am PT
Here just some of the soft gear I've built. I've done more climbing stuff like Gear Slings, chalk bag, Bivi sack, some more haul bags and crag packs, ect, but haven't taken any pictures to post. I'm working on a ledge now. I have done lots of non climbing stuff as well. It's cool to build this kind of stuff. You get stuff the way you want it with the materials, sizes, and features that you couldn't get any other way and I've found that the stuff I've been making is nicer, just as strong or stronger, and way, way, way less money So go get a really nice sewing machine start learning to use it. Take a sewing class It will pay for it's self in no time.
Med and Large Hall bags
Med and Large Hall bags
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Removable straps tuck away like the A5 bags. padded back panel.
Removable straps tuck away like the A5 bags. padded back panel.
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Adders with 2 inch wide webbing for steps (adds comfort)  and ...
Adders with 2 inch wide webbing for steps (adds comfort) and they collapse up to the handels that unroll to wrap them up in and keep out of the way.
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Adjustable Dazy's
Adjustable Dazy's
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Hammer holster with snap keeper
Hammer holster with snap keeper
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
Bouldering Chalk bucket monster
Bouldering Chalk bucket monster
Credit: Jonnnyyyzzz
GuapoVino

Trad climber
All Up In Here
Feb 7, 2012 - 11:26am PT
Awesome work, great looking gear. I used to make a lot of my own gear on my Juki DNU-241 sewing machine - backpacks, tents, bivy sacks.

The roof membranes are pretty similar to some of the materials that are used to make rafts. Several years ago I built a one-man cat-a-raft out of PVC coated nylon, the same material that Seal Line drybags are made out of. I glued it together with a glue called HH-66. It was a royal pain in the ass to get those curving cone shapes to lay right on the ends and not look like crap (and hold air). I did a lot of exploring in that home built raft. I can post pics if anyone is interested. Of course if you're making something like a haul bag out of roof membrane type material and it doesn't have to be completely waterproof you can just sew it, assuming you have a beast of a sewing machine.

I built a fiberglass sea kayak and a kevlar canoe also. Epoxy is pretty cool to work with.
jfailing

Trad climber
Lone Pine
Feb 7, 2012 - 12:01pm PT
Very cool stuff everyone!

I already posted this on another thread, but oh well... Myles in Lone Pine has been making tons of gear. Here are some pics of the mods he made for the fly on my Fish ledge.

I'm sure he'd post some pics, but he's probably freezing his ass off up on Keeler Needle right now...

The yellow pole meets with another smaller black pole which connects t...
The yellow pole meets with another smaller black pole which connects to just below the ledge clip-in.
Credit: jfailing

Credit: jfailing

BCB Custom Ledge Fly
BCB Custom Ledge Fly
Credit: jfailing
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