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ionlyski

Trad climber
Kalispell, Montana
Apr 10, 2010 - 11:57pm PT
once there were enough interested people in the burgeoning town

Which town was that?

Nice thread-thanks,
Arne
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 12:06am PT
C'mon Anders , cough up the REAL REASON the BCMC formed as the Leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition to the Alpine Club of Canada - formed in 1906.


Wasn't it a hissy fit about a CABIN on Grouse Mtn? Oh, did I use the "C" word in the COAST RANGE ?!? We Don't Like Cabins ; Those Are For The Rockies ( Where Climbers Are Soft )


Okay so this is the second post in this most legitimate of threads & I won't go all L or Pate on you but seein'z how thissis Sutporrrr Torrrrpor and Canadians number in the single percentage......... I thought I'd just be sassy enough to GO DIRT on ya...........rather then erudite. ( Dirt over erudition any day, eh ? )

And it'SNOT a "Rockies vs Coast Range climbers" thread. :-D

I like the thread name "Climbing to the Clouds". Don't we typically START in the clouds at SEA LEVEL ?!

Or is that just the fog in my ( so called ) brain ?


BooYah

Social climber
Ely, Nv
Apr 11, 2010 - 12:12am PT
I LIKE this Tami Gal.
You Rock, Tami.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 11, 2010 - 12:17am PT
The history as presented goes back to the late 19th century, with snippets of earlier things - explorers, First Peoples, etc. But the main part starts in the early 1900s. If I understand correctly, when the BCMC formed in mid-1907, the members had heard of the invention of the Alpine Club of Canada the previous year. But the ACC (later the Airborne Climbers of Canada) had negligible presence on the coast until the later 1920s, when a faction splintered off from the BCMC. It may be more complicated, and involve personalities and issues lost in the depths of time. Perhaps Tricouni can elaborate. (He was there today.)

As Tami observes, often here climbing to the clouds can be accomplished by ascending a flight of stairs, if that.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 12:21am PT
Tami,

It's the fog in your brain.

Had a lung buster today on skis with Foodeater and there wasn't a cloud around. Still, trying to follow the guy is like being a dog whose leash got caught in a car door.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 01:08am PT
JB you SUCK. I WORKED today. ALL day.


Foodeater's a LUNATIC; glad it was YER LEASH caught in his barn door and NOT YER..................THUMB.


More liquor !!

BUmp !!!
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Apr 11, 2010 - 02:17am PT
isn't it also a sorta rip off of the Conrad Kain biography title: Where the Clouds Can Go, or was that just Conrad being a bit peevish with the editors?
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 02:33am PT
Tami,

I don't suck, I chew. And following Greg is work. All day. But it was a good day and a great way 2 step away from the computer. Sad for the shut ins But not sad for grabbing the fun goodies!

Jim, @workalicious.robot WHAH, HAHAHAHAHAHA
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 11, 2010 - 02:56am PT
It probably ain't worth a fek if there wasn't something there about Hatten's Hammer.:^)
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 10:22am PT
this is a post about cloud, fog and scotch.

get back on topic hosers
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
Apr 11, 2010 - 10:23am PT
Anders: Thanks for posting the link.

I am always curious when I look at most current museum offerings, including this one.

Do the museum directors believe the people that go to their museum all have A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADHD_predominantly_inattentive )

Or do the museum directors all have A.D.D.?
Chief

climber
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:23am PT
Thanks for the post Mighty.
At what point do we become museum pieces?
Currently poring over the Munday's exploits in the Waddington Range.
Don and Phyllis were BAD ASS MOUNTAINEERS and harder than nails.
What a legacy!

Tami, yer a most loveable wingnut.
bk, nice job on your letter to the Pique, when do we get together for scotch?
gf

climber
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:28am PT
Chief,

On your Munday jag, I'm sure you've read "A Passion for Mountains"; how about some of those weekend jaunts Don Munday and his friends did out of Vancouver pre-WWI? The word burly comes to mind.

gf
Chief

climber
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:37am PT
forager,

Those guys have me inspired to plan a trip to the Wadd next spring.
Self propelled from Coola/Scar shoulder to Buckler/Spearman/Wadd shoulder.
The road from the beach to Scar has just been repaired and Rob Wood and I are trying to wrangle a "Gaitor" and a work crew to clean up the access from the Scar Camp to the top of the Scar Ridge. Trying to make this part of this year's Butefest. Looking for dedicated keeners up for a summer adventure.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:46am PT
mundays and crew would take the ferry across burrard inlet and crank off crown from sea level
in the fog and drinking scotch the whole way - kinda like that old picture of vermin
And so history gets twisted

perry - next time its foggy and i'm back in the corridor
Mike Bolte

Trad climber
Planet Earth
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:51am PT
ah, i finally get it. Foweraker -> forager ->food eater
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 12:46pm PT
Oooooh.

Face crackly from Sun yesterday. I foget sun screen. Fogging Hell. It's fun though to fog on to the museum web site and learn about old fogies who climbed and what they liked to fogus on. Wine last night is clouding my fogjectivity.

Jim
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 11, 2010 - 12:46pm PT
anders, thanks for the link.


fritz-- museum visitors (esp. on the web) DO have ADD. most writing on/for the web now is aimed at about a 6th grade reading level, which is still a bit above what we mostly get here on old ivy-covered ST.

This Climbing to the Clouds site is actually fairly old-skool, aside from the Google-Earth interactive pages: it has mini-essays, a linear chronology, and an overarching (and didactic) storyline. each of those features offers to antagonize huge chunks of the museum audience, let alone the folks in the tubes.

i thought the davidson segment was the best done. it'd work fine with the 5th to 9th graders.

as a historian, i'd really like to have seen a page or at least usable links on the actual sources used to make the site, like a resource page for teachers.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 01:52pm PT
Looks like killer ski conditions up there right now ... Tanatalus range yesterday from the highway pullout

Tanatalus Range, Squamish BC  - April 10/2010
Tanatalus Range, Squamish BC - April 10/2010
Credit: Bruce MacDonald

Click image for a much higher quality view
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 01:54pm PT
Hey Anders, havin' sniffed thru the thing I find it to be most excellent but oddly incomplete. FABULOUS to see the artwork of Shives !!

It's more like RANDOM history of BC mountaineering. I think they missed out big stories like Slesse ( the first ascent, FWA, the airplane crash, NE Buttress, et'c ) to name one.

How can John Clarke be mentioned without John Baldwin? If you speak of Clarke's conservation, then yeah, but mountaineering ? Those two went together on a million miles of trips.

And a mention of Hollyburn Mtn sans Fred Burfield is kinda like leavin Jesus outta the Bible. Okay so not that big of an omission but weird. Bob Tapp was in on the credits so safe to assume it was he giving the 411 on H/burn. I wonder if Bob and ol Freddy mixed it up once :-D. Maybe a fight over Fred's too-loud generator ? Now I AM Getting obscure....

From 1980 onward it's pretty much a vacuum with the FN Snowboarders highlighted........the what ? Great lookin' 'board there but I'm not sure how important this was to the history of BC Mountaineering.

Looking in the credits reveals most of the folks are over the age of sixty so that makes the gap in the last thirty years understandable........but, it is glaring.

All to say HEY ANDERS GET YER BUTT IN GEAR AND WRITE THAT DAMN BOOK YOOVE BEEN YAPPIN" ABOUT.

Yeah !
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 02:06pm PT
skiing is grim
skiing is grim
Credit: Bruce Kay
BmacD

I don't know about your zone but further west just got demolished by out flows
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 02:28pm PT
Bruce Kay you are living the life .... looks good out there
Zenith Mountain - Tantalus Range BC - April 10/2010
Zenith Mountain - Tantalus Range BC - April 10/2010
Credit: bmacd

Click image for higher resolution
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 11, 2010 - 02:54pm PT
Tami:
C'mon Anders , cough up the REAL REASON the BCMC formed as the Leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition to the Alpine Club of Canada - formed in 1906.

Wasn't it a hissy fit about a CABIN on Grouse Mtn? Oh, did I use the "C" word in the COAST RANGE ?!? We Don't Like Cabins ; Those Are For The Rockies ( Where Climbers Are Soft )

AFAIK, the BCMC formed before the Vancouver Section of the ACC, perhaps a couple of years before. Cabins were a big part of the BCMC, right from the beginning. There were various cabins on Grouse from pre-1900, even. Certainly the early days of the BCMC revolved around the cabin, weekends at the cabin, and trips from the north shore to the local hills. It was hard to get anywhere else: after the old roads were abandoned, even the Lions were a 3-day trip up the Capilano, unless you had a boat. Whistler area? Forget it. Chilliwack valley? Week's expedition.

The hissy fit (and that's what it was)came about in late 1926. At two General Meetings of the BCMC there were motions debated / passed / defeated regarding censure of one of the members of the executive, almost certainly Tom Fyles, who held the position of "Director", regarding his somewhat dictatorail leaderhship of club trips. The upshot was that "The Director immediately rose and resigned his membership in the Club, and the following members of the Executive then followed his example: J.H Speer, W.G. Wheatley, R.E. Knight, N.M. Carter, B.C. Cayley, and W.E. Martin."

The loss of Tom Fyles and Neal Carter was a great blow to the club, because they (together with the Mundays) were among the club's strongest, most active climbers. It was this event that gave great impetus to the local section of the ACC. Don and Phy Munday remained members of both clubs, and eventually in the 1930s let their memberships in the BCMC lapse.

This detailed reasons for the split were eventually forgotten, and no record of them exists in the BCMC minutes for the day,which are not to be found in the club archives. The two clubs continued to hold some joint trips, and many members belonged to both clubs.

When I joined the BCMC in 1959, I found it very welcoming to teenagers. I inquired whether the Alpine Club took young teenagers on trips; never did hear back from them, and my friends in the BCMC discouraged me from joining the ACC, even though my uncle was a member of the ACC. So I fell into the company of Dick Culbert, Tim Auger, Arnold Shives, Martin & Esther Kafer (the Kafers were in both clubs), Dick Chambers, Paul Binkert, Roy Mason, and the like. So today, some people are in the BCMC, some in the ACC, and some in both. Which one has had, collectively, the stronger group of active climbers has swung back and forth over the years - currently it's probably the ACC.

Glenn Woodsworth
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 11, 2010 - 03:04pm PT
Tami wrote:
Hey Anders, havin' sniffed thru the thing I find it to be most excellent but oddly incomplete. FABULOUS to see the artwork of Shives !!

I totally agree; I like his work a great deal (but I'm pretty biased).

[quoteIt's more like RANDOM history of BC mountaineering. I think they missed out big stories like Slesse ( the first ascent, FWA, the airplane crash, NE Buttress, et'c ) to name one.

For sure. I hope they continue to build on it and deal with the last 30 years. Baldwin? Clarke? Kasian? Serl? Fairley? Croft? Foweraker? to name just a random few. The site's got great potential, but it's clear the focus will always be on the coast, which is fine with me. Another group will have to do the Interior Ranges and (shudder) the Rockies.

- Glenn (a Coast Mountains brat - always was, always will be)


bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 03:20pm PT
So Foweraker is history ? Such promise now gone to waste ...
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 11, 2010 - 03:25pm PT
Naw, Foweraker, Serl, Baldwin aren't history yet. Are they? I guess Fairley isn't history, either, but he seems to be history in the Coast Mountains. (That's what living in Golden does to you....)

When does one become a museum-piece?
mazamarick

Trad climber
WA
Apr 11, 2010 - 04:26pm PT
That must make Sinclair and Smaill history, right?
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 04:31pm PT
Relic hominids all of them, science should be done on their DNA.

More evidence that multiple classes of ancient branches of the hominid tree are still walking amongst us. Rarely observed and often misidentified yet the legends persist.

Homo Aplinus, more study and documentation of their existence is needed to pay tribute to the species.
Chief

climber
Apr 11, 2010 - 06:49pm PT
Relic Hominid?


Thanks Bruce, that explains everything. At last, I've found my tribe.
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
Apr 11, 2010 - 08:15pm PT
Funny how these 'northern neighbors' threads don't seem to turn
into pissing matches even when someone gets accused of belonging
to a dead-end branch on the 'hominid' tree. Yous guys really are
different! :-D
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 09:17pm PT
Yer a museum piece ........when ya post as "tricouni" :-D Hahahaha........who here actually KNOWS what tricounies are, eh ? ( Okay, on THIS forum there are LOTS of folks who wore boots w/ tricounis ) hahahaha again.

Glenn A ZILLION thanks for the post about the cabin & the history. Frankly I think that personal stuff is more important then the dates and ascents because it highlights the personalities and gut-reasons for the history to have happened.

One very wonderful thing about this type of forum is that it provides a platform for a people's history - such that it is, at times, unfettered, unfiltered, totally adulterated opinions. But that too is the history & it's the authors of the history books who tend to get to decide. That, and their publishers.

I'm always annoyed by history books that arbitrarily cut off at some date in the past. Living history can be written down........and, if some of it becomes more or less relevant in the future then so be it. But to just say that because the person is still alive ergo they aren't yet a museum piece is silly.

The Croft/Foodeater/SurlyDon traverse of the Wadd & range in '85 was spectacular history & had been predicated on the fast & light ascents those guys ( croft in particular ) had been doing in the Bugs & lower Coast Range in previous years.

By the same token the huge traverses that Clarke/Baldwin were doing in those years ( or later ? ) were also being challenged by Kobus B & Emily , and the kids who did the Fraser River to Alaska trip on skis ( I am SO SORRY but I have forgotten who this was - Vance Culbert, et'c ? Guy Edwards? The Rowat sisters were in on some of that. ) THAT is BIG history.

I"m sure not sayin' I know more then what these folks know but it would be great to see a more complete 'history'. A quick perusal of Chic Scott's Pushing The Limits would be a killer place to start.



Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 10:27pm PT
Relic yes, but Hominid? are you guys sure?
aren't at least a few sporting dorsal fins and tails?

BC sub species anyway...the climate explains it.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:10pm PT
Some coastal types balance business acumen with great climbing skills.

Credit: Jim Brennan
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:11pm PT
^^^^ Are those his LEGS or is he bi-penised and WALKING on them ?








The mind boggles.










bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 11, 2010 - 11:49pm PT
CougarLife.com = 1000 Tami's

Anders, signup now ....
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:23am PT
ya know that guy looks just a bit like mike down
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:43am PT
He's Hominid Representicus. A Renaissance dude around these parts.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:57am PT
That picture looks kinda like Bricks.

I haven't visited the virtual museum, but any attempt at telling the story of BC mountaineering by looking through the lens of club membership seems kind of silly.

BCMC? ACC? Sure, there was plenty of climbing done on club trips, but there was, and is, just as much done by climbers. Not club members, just climbers.

And about the cabin thing, Tami's probably just pissed because Rat Hall doesn't feature prominently in museum.

D
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:12am PT
David, the virtual museum 'exhibit' primarily relates to the period from the late 19th century, through the 1960s and 1970s. So is somewhat oriented toward what the BCMC and ACC and their members were doing, given that they had a finger in most of what was being done during that period. Yes, there's more to the story than that, e.g. in the 1960s the energy of the baby boomers in the VOC, and the appearance of independent climbers. (Jim Baldwin may have been one of the first.) But what's there is an interesting initiative, even if a bit too club-oriented, and can be added to.

Glad to see there's some interest in this subject - I hoped there would be. It's probably impossible to satisfy anyone let alone everyone with any museum display, let alone a new-fangled virtual display, but it illustrates the sort of thing that's possible. You can't fit everything in, of course, and historiography eventually rears its head.

Just back from a full day working on a project at Squamish. Cleaning an old route on the Apron, called Slab Alley. The first route on our Apron, done in 1961 by Jim Baldwin and Tony Cousins. The current phase is to physically clean up the route, restore the existing/accepted bolts (ten total), and consider options. The idea being to recreate a moderate and reasonably manageable independent route on the Apron. The 1961 route, done in mountain boots, involved some fierce slab climbing for the time.

There's some pretty cool virtual history on the YCA site - www.yosemiteclimbing.org
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:23am PT
Bricks shannan? whoa yer right
It was the laptop, briefcase and cell phone headset that made me think of MD. mike went from a underfunded granola cruncher to high flying sales tycoon in about a month - and hasn't stopped.

I went with Bricks, Bob milward and pete shackleton and i think ross nicol and maybe some others in the middle of winter to assault the vulcans thumb. i think we made it as far as metal dome and froze in gregs mackinley tent. I think i wore jeans and got blisters. For some reason i always remember that tent full of fog from the cooking pot and greg looking like that guy (kinda like Hagrid in harry potter) laughing on the other side.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:37am PT
I went with Bricks, Bob milward and pete shackleton

Wow. If you were to try to come up with three guys about whom stories could be told until the End of Days, those three would have to be at the top of the list.

I can't even begin to remember how many times Pete Shack said "Oh, I don't know. I'm really out of shape right now. No way I can climb/run/ride worth a sh#t. I don't know if I should even go out. You'll have to wait for me all day..." And then he'd just smoke me on whatever the day's adventure was. Master sandbagger.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:50am PT
Ghost:
I haven't visited the virtual museum, but any attempt at telling the story of BC mountaineering by looking through the lens of club membership seems kind of silly.

BCMC? ACC? Sure, there was plenty of climbing done on club trips, but there was, and is, just as much done by climbers. Not club members, just climbers.


The virtual museum thing (in which I had no hand, didn't know about it until a week ago) is simply one window on things. It comes, in part, out of the BCMC centennial video and related research, and partly out of the fact that the museum and the BCMC both have extensive archives of photos, diaries, etc. by early BMCM members. I hope they can expand the site to include the ACC, the BCMC, the RRC, the VOC, the FSSSCC, and the unaffiliated (to use an AAC term). It's a start; we can either mock it or suggest how to improve it.

But most climbing wasn't done on club trips, not then, not now. As I said above, some people were in one club, some in another, some in both, and some in no club. Some of the best climbers didn't need the clubs: they met like-minded friends outside the clubs. Many people meet friends, learn some basic skills, and quickly outgrow the clubs.

But others (Culbert, me, Fyles, Carter, Beckey, Clarke many others) found our climbing partners through the assorted clubs. We learned basic skills and mostly moved on. Many quit the clubs; others kept up memberships but didn't take much of an active role. We may have moved on, but loyalty to the clubs can remain: the BCMC certainly changed my life, and I met my wife through the VOC. I don't think I've been on a club trip in 40 years, but I still sign my name in summit records "Glenn Woodsworth, BCMC."


Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 12, 2010 - 10:04am PT
I hope they can expand the site to include the ACC, the BCMC, the RRC, the VOC, the FSSSCC

And the Lobsters. Can't really talk about mountaineering in BC without The Red Lobsters Mountaineering Club.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 10:50am PT
I always thought that whem pete shack got all excited and his eyes started to bulge out and he got that maniacal grin on his face - he looked exactly like Marty Feldman.

anyone know if shack and joyce made it home from the south seas yet?

and did someone say Bricks passed away or something about a hearse?

edit: oh yeah.. his hearse!
Chief

climber
Apr 12, 2010 - 11:14am PT
I've seldom been inspired or impressed by the "Beard Stroking, Pontificating Clubbers".
(I had an encounter with one of their senior ilk at the Lake Lovelywater hut a few years ago that left me disgusted to this day)

Hugh Burton's account of their ascent of the Cassin (Hugh apparently wore jeans over his capilene) or being chased off the North Howser by a wild lightning storm after climbing Warrior are much more inspiring examples of BC Mountaineering.

Perry
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 11:21am PT
the problem with clubs is that they involve leaders

kind of like government
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 11:59am PT
here's one for the books...

did you guys know that Bob Milward did the first winter girdle traverse of Ben Nevis?

i sh#t you not
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:07pm PT
I took the BCMC crevasse rescue and glacier travel course in the 70's. I think clubs perform a great service helping people get started and connect with like minded others. For those commenting above whom are "born to climb" (Homo Alipnus) clubs serve little purpose.

50 years ago the club thing would have been a much different atmosphere than today I think. Certainly the historical aspect of club archives are valuable to all.

I think this "Climbing to the clouds" should focus on the history of climbing on the coast. The rockies is already well documented. The coast historical fragments are still scattered in the attics of individuals, be they club members or not.

 http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=phyllis+munday&aq=f

A major project to collate it all.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:09pm PT
I've seldom been inspired or impressed by the "Beard Stroking, Pontificating Clubbers". (I had an encounter with one of their senior ilk at the Lake Lovelywater hut a few years ago that left me disgusted to this day)

Which brings up another interesting point. While it's true that in the very early days climbing clubs had a big impact -- in the sense that club members going on club trips actually did some serious climbing -- I think it's also true that the clubs have sometimes stood in the way of climbing. Or at least, because of their stodgy atmosphere and sometimes restrictive approach, driven away many climbers. Clubs have rules, a lot of climbers hate the idea of rules being applied to climbing.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:12pm PT
Chief wrote:
I've seldom been inspired or impressed by the "Beard Stroking, Pontificating Clubbers".
(I had an encounter with one of their senior ilk at the Lake Lovelywater hut a few years ago that left me disgusted to this day)

I've met plenty of that type, too, with similarly disgusting results. Oddly enough, one of the worst was at the Lake Lovelywater hut - something in the water there? And one at the Gunks.
Pate

Trad climber
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:25pm PT
Okay so this is the second post in this most legitimate of threads & I won't go all L or Pate on you

you can aspire to greatness though Tami- everyone can dream. few reach the prowess of L and I.

I was once told by Rudy Beglinger about the number of unclimbed summits in BC, both the Coastal Range and interior; he said over 90% of the peaks were unclimbed, and named with only numbers. Is that true?
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
Apr 12, 2010 - 12:51pm PT
"Beard Stroking, Pontificating Clubbers"

Thank heavens we've none of those here!
Chief

climber
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:04pm PT
My comments about the clubs was about some people in some local clubs and not mountaineering clubs in general.

One of my first trip into the mountains was with Peter Croft and a couple people on an Island Mountain Ramblers outing. It changed my and now that I think about it, Tom DeGroot had a beard and he did stroke it a lot and did pontificate.
Dave Robert's exploits with the Harvard Mountaineers stand out as early inspirations for me.
Locally, the Auger/Tate Woodsworth effort on U Wall stands out as a club effort that set the highest big wall standards of the day.

That puke at Lovelywater just happens to represent an arrogant "upper crust" mentality that stimulates my hurl reflex.

Respectfully,

PB

ps. Rudy's frikkin high!
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:16pm PT
Pate 90% is a ridiculous figure. The peaks are rated by prominence on this site

The website is not a simple wiki. It is a geographic information system, organized by lat-long. This means searches are not based on placenames, they are based on geographic proximity. This is important, because hundreds of the articles involve mountains that are unnamed

http://www.bivouac.com/default.asp
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:32pm PT
I was once told by Rudy Beglinger about the number of unclimbed summits in BC, both the Coastal Range and interior; he said over 90% of the peaks were unclimbed, and named with only numbers. Is that true?

Depends what you mean by a peak. There are still plenty of small summits that have never been climbed, including many with names. 90% is far too high. Plenty of small, hard pinnacles. Even a few relatively high-prominence (for the region), hard peaks remain, but you have to know where they are!

Most summits in the Coast Mtns don't have names, so people just talk about "Peak 9535" when they talk about them at all. The owners of Bivouac.com have taken to wandering around (electronically) with a big salt-and-pepper shaker full of useless names, sprinkling liberally. Don't get me started....
MH2

climber
Apr 12, 2010 - 01:58pm PT

I was once a member of a club that now belongs in a museum.



Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 12, 2010 - 02:07pm PT
I don't think it's fair to say "the clubs" but there were - and prolly still are - some real asshats in the clubs - and otherwise - who 'looked down' on rock climber-types, considering them some kind of lifeform distinct from homo mountaineerus.

Of course Steve & Hugh's ascent of the Cassin was rad & I totally agree Burton prolly wore jeans but not over capilene - over some shitty wool longjohns he otherwise wore on cold days in town. :-D

The "clubs" did some hard mountaineering back when Tom Fyles was leading trips but that wasn't fifty years ago, it was eighty years ago. By the war, the clubs were serving to introduce folks to the hills and the VOC , in particular was a dating club as much as it was a climbing club - which makes sense if you think of the ol biological urge. My parents met at the VOC in the fall of 1945.

I imagine the last 'hard trip' any club led was when Hugh put onto the ACC Vancouver Section list that he'd lead Uncle Ben's if anybody wanted to accompany him. I think that was in '76.

Sure there are people affiliated with the clubs who were doing hard trips but I'd say they were NOT the norm.

And Pete Shack TOTALLY looks like Marty Feldman when he gets going.

Hilarious about Milward doing that FWA on the Ben. He STILL looks like Christopher Robin. HAHAHAHA..... never ever in the history of mountaineering has there been a MORE UNLIKELY looking 'hard guy'.


edit .... ^^^^^ HAHAHAHAAHAAAAA HAHAAA
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 12, 2010 - 02:08pm PT
I recently read the first volume of Royal Robbins' autobiography, To Be Brave. It's well written and interesting, mostly about his youth, framed by his solo ascent of the Leaning Tower in 1963. One interesting aspect is his introduction to mountaineering and climbing, through the boy scouts and then the Sierra Club. He has a lot of praise for the organizations and their leaders. How many of us here got started through some similar program - scouts, guides, outward bound, local clubs, etc? Even now? Yes, such groups are now usually far from the leading edge, tend to be run by older people who like to reminisce (kind of like SuperTopo), and can be conservative and stodgy. But credit where credit is due, and they've contributed a lot.

Painting clubs with a broad brush doesn't make a lot of sense. Some have somewhat reinvented themselves, too - such as the AAC, in part in response to the success of the Access Fund.

I have no more liking for being organized in my climbing by others than anyone else. But it's part of our modern world, whether it's those who manage the places we like to go to or whatever. Like it or not, climbers have to be organized and represented - that's how democracy works. The Climbers' Access Society of BC was created in 1995 for that role, to ensure there was effective representation on key issues. Being anti-organization and anti-authority as kneejerk thing is senseless, as society becomes increasingly interdependent.

the Auger/Tate Woodsworth effort on U Wall stands out as a UBC club effort
As in Tim Auger, Dan Tate, Glenn Woodsworth and Hamish Mutch of the Varsity Outdoor Club, in 1966. A stout effort. Two of the four post here. Maybe someday one of them will post stories about the Cacodemon Climbing Club.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 02:36pm PT
Tricouni can you recommend an alternate compendium of info for BC peaks other than Bivoac.com. Paper or electronic is fine, I'm just curious and would like to do some digging around on the coast range.

Thanks
Bruce
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 12, 2010 - 02:44pm PT
the baby-boomer generation in north america was deeply suspicious of and hostile to institutions-- everywhere and not just in climbing.

in climbing, institutions like the aac or sierra club or cac seemed sclerotic and backward and dominated by parental figures.

so most climbers privatized, creating loose, informal social groups based on friendship, geography, and interests. some of those groups endured over time, but many didn't. and the institutions the baby boomers and gen xers didn't join, grew smaller, and weaker, and lost influence.

we have a tendency to imagine that the clubs as we knew them in the 60s or 70s or 80s were always sclerotic and backward. but that's not necessarily the case. club life was far more important for climbers-- and north americans generally-- in the years before WW2. jay taylor's forthcoming history of climbing in yos shows that it was constant work and pressure from the sierra club that kept a strong faction in the nps from banning climbing in yosemite.

moreover, we've lost a lot by choosing to privatize rather than to join and do the hard work of reforming the club world. now, each and every battle for this or that issue-- access at this crag, preventing this bit of environmental despoliation, keeping climbing legal --requires that we start all over and put in the time and labor to create a special interest institution.

institutions are much easier to tear down than they are to build.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 12, 2010 - 04:17pm PT
Kerwin has some good points. The baby-boomers aversion to their parents' institutions, although perhaps somewhat overstated in popular myth, was in part almost Freudian. It really wasn't anything new, just there were more people and they were noisier about it. Pretty standard adolescent male behaviour, much like the territorial and exclusive behaviour of some climbers.

Ultimately, though, it's pretty clear that climbers have to be organized and represented on an ongoing basis on key issues such as access, safety, commercial pressures and conservation. An ad hoc approach doesn't do it, nor does a small tent strategy.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 05:32pm PT
Herb Bluer could sure go on about clubbies (among other things) and had lots of stories of being spat upon etc durring encounters while he was ski guiding (heli)
And whats with that lake lovely water cabin? i've had a few interesting events there. It does have a particularly gloomy feel to it - no?

still i think we're just talking about a few rotten apples . my mom and dad seemed ok!

furhtermore the bcmc in particularly put up some fight about degrading of provincial parks etc.
There is still Heliskiing in Garibaldi park. what the hells up with that bull? Maybe they should have spat a little harder!

A bunch of crusty wackos maybe but thier hearts in the right spot more or less.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 12, 2010 - 05:45pm PT
speaking of unclimbed peaks, when is somebody going to tag that frighteningly spectacular piece of crap vulcans thumb? you can damn near spit and hit it from vancouver. that aint right.
why arn't the crash padders hurling themselves at it like a bunch of tutonic brown shirt eigerwanders? whats with those rastafarian wood elves anyway? they call themselves climbers?
I bet they're not even BCMCers.

For decades everyones been waiting for the "Magic Freeze" on vulcans thumb. I bet if someone actually touched it it would turn out to be splitter basalt. someone go find out.

I know- we can get some merrycans to do it. It looks like the south face of aconcagua from the squamish valley and merrycans like to climb that. We should lottery it off as a anti fish farm fundraiser.
Pate

Trad climber
Apr 12, 2010 - 05:49pm PT
thanks bmacd. that link is killer.
Chief

climber
Apr 12, 2010 - 06:29pm PT
bk, they're Pebble Wrestlers
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 12, 2010 - 10:19pm PT
I took a climbing course as a teen from the FMCBC. What I love and remember about it was the instructors were all volunteer and definitely NOT cookie cutter Guides.

Belaying practice was to be lashed to a shrub with leather gloves on. A Goldline hawser around your waist took a catenary line up to two jokers tying it around a 200 lb rock.

With 10' of air between the rock and the anchor, gravity at the hands of the chuckling hardcores took hold. The pain and simultaneous laughter at catching the rock was contagious. I finally understood Rodeo.

KLK is on the money and club activity isn't always revenge of the nerds.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 12, 2010 - 10:22pm PT
Not sure why it's called the Vulcan's Thumb - it should be called the Vulcan's Dump.

To wit:
"Once upon a time Vulcan, a really big god in a really big land, really had to go. He went to the mountains. His big dump is still there. If you want to go climb it you really have to want to climb vertical poo."

And after ya do that, you can go do the north side of Black Tusk + "the bishop" jes'fer fun.

Finish up by doing the keyhole on The Table.

Yarrrrrhghghg!!!! Choss-a-holics untie!!!!



Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Apr 13, 2010 - 12:04am PT
Fred touche and Ivan Bandic tried the Vulcan's Thumb not long after doing the FA of Perkins pillar. They climbed on snow up the SW face gully to the notch at the base of the final rock tower and said it was the most horrible crap you can imagine. I was glad I'd stayed home with the flu.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 12:16am PT
yeah but i bet its the most splitter horrible crap you can imagine. i realy think we should auction it off some how. maybe at the next john howe slide show. get some guide to donate a day.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 13, 2010 - 12:19am PT
i realy think we should auction it off some how.

Maybe we should require the Americans to take it as a condition of taking our water?
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
Apr 13, 2010 - 12:24am PT
Ghost: I for one, will agree to share those choss-piles: only if you first annex us.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 13, 2010 - 12:25am PT
Dick Culbert, my brother Bob, I, and a couple of others tried Vulcan's Thumb in 1965(?). It was September, not the best time, admittedly. We climbed the rock to the left (north) of the gully Oplopanax mentioned. The plan was to rappel into the notch from the peaklet just to the north. We made it to almost to the top of the peaklet before bailing. We knew we were beat. Nightmarish rock; I think we had one or two ropes cut by rockfall during the descent raps. We did figure that the gully in winter was the way to go.
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:09am PT
Calling this virtual museum "A People's History of BC Mountaineering" is a bit of a stretch. Someone mentioned upthread that the last 30 years or so are missing. Also missing is any mention of the Interior Mountains. For you coastal [and southern] people that's the Cariboo Mountains, the Monashees, the North and South Selkirks and the Purcells. Just minor league stuff like Roger's Pass, where it all started, the Bugs etc. etc..... They probably got a bigger grant by claiming to cover all of BC.

Bruce Fairley isn't history in the Coast Range, or anywhere else. He did a big route down there last summer [2009], and it should be in the next CAJ.

Tami is partially correct when she says that VOC was primarily a dating club. When I was a member it was both a dating and a downhill skiing club, but definitely not a climbing club. The climbing was done by the aptly named Splinter Soc. Talking of dating, that's also where Tricouni met his wife!! I always say that I should have married a VOC girl as well. Hindsight.

Tricouni takes too long to type, so I'm just going to call him Nails. There is a good picture of Nails on this museum site, which is credited to Barry Hagen. I noticed an uncanny resemblance to a photo which i took of Nails on the third morning of our ascent of the U Wall. I would go as far as to say that it looks EXACTLY the same. But museums never make mistakes.

On a slight tangent, I received my complementary copy of Kevin McLane's new guidebook 'Canadian Rock--Select Climbs of the West' this afternoon. It's terrific. All the very best rock routes in Alberta and BC. Quoting from the back cover:
70 climbing areas
1300 climbs
2300 pitches
800 photos and topos


one different feature about this guide is that it does not list the names of the FA parties, so no ego trips here.
----so much to climb, so little time.

Cheers H.

Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:15am PT
Hamie:
Tricouni takes too long to type, so I'm just going to call him Nails. There is a good picture of Nails on this museum site, which is credited to Barry Hagen. I noticed an uncanny resemblance to a photo which i took of Nails on the third morning of our ascent of the U Wall. I would go as far as to say that it looks EXACTLY the same. But museums never make mistakes.


Oh yes, they do make mistakes! Glad you pointed that out; I'm about to email and get it fixed. (I've pointed out another error to them as well.) I didn't know who took it, but makes sense that it was in U Wall days.

Glad that Fairley is still making history in the Coast Mtns.

Glenn
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:23am PT
Make that Hardass Nails!!
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:24am PT
Hamie:
Calling this virtual museum "A People's History of BC Mountaineering" is a bit of a stretch. Someone mentioned upthread that the last 30 years or so are missing. Also missing is any mention of the Interior Mountains. For you coastal [and southern] people that's the Cariboo Mountains, the Monashees, the North and South Selkirks and the Purcells. Just minor league stuff like Roger's Pass, where it all started, the Bugs etc. etc..... They probably got a bigger grant by claiming to cover all of BC.

Several people, including me, have pointed out that it's essentially a Coast Mtns site. There are other institutions (ACC, Archives of Cdn Rockies, AAC) that have extensive archives of Rockies stuff - not sure about the Interior Ranges. The North Van site can't compete with them. But you are probably correct: the $$ they received from the Feds was probably tied to something broader than just SW BC.

But, some years ago, I contacted Archives of Cdn Rockies about donating some very early Coast Mtns and Omineca Mtns stuff - they were supremely uninterested. So those photos are at UBC now.

There's lots of room for different approaches to a "History of Climbing in BC." The North Van site is just a start, I hope.

Glenn
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:50am PT
David as a condition of steal.......erm.........taking .......our water can they please take Gordo The DUI ?


neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:58am PT
hey there mighty hiker, say, thanks for the interesting post...

wow, tami is here... say, there, and hey there, tami...

happy to see you,
god bless your day, night, or whatever, as to whatever time
it is now... (it is tue, 1:51 am here) ...

:)
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:59am PT
At least the Virtual Museum exhibit is called A People's History of B.C. Mountaineering, rather than The History of... It suggests that it isn't claiming to be anything more than it is.

Historiography is a fascinating subject, to me anyway.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historiography
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annales_School
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:09am PT
Maybe all of us from the axe grinders to the irrelevant should meet up for a beer, or some few!

Hamish and Glenn, Ghost and the Tami, BmacD,Pate and Perry, so slam me. The fun is what matters with Bricks and Foodeater, with Andy and Anders the cold's no defeater.

So offer up peaks and the tries full of slander, the truth is for wankers so what does it matter. The goods we've experienced without an appearance and friendship is first so don't pray for the worst.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:14am PT
one different feature about this guide is that it does not list the names of the FA parties, so no ego trips here.

Another full on guidebook botch. If it was truly an egoless guidebook the authors name should be absent as well. Kevin what are you thinking ???

Dismiss the people who had the wherewithal to put the route up by excluding them from the guidebook is a feature ? I think not. It is pure disrespect.

Approach Devils Thumb from Brandywine by snowmobile in winter. Possibly do it in a day with experienced riders / Winter Alpinists. I have a Skidoo 800 ready to rock and roll ... except I havent climbed in 10 years. Been a few years since I was out past Powder Mtn but heres a picture taken from Powder Dome summit or nearby.

Cayley with Pyroclastic in behind it ...
Cayley with Pyroclastic in behind it ...
Credit: bmacd
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:31am PT
Bmacd:
Approach Devils Thumb from Brandywine by snowmobile in winter. Possibly do it in a day with experienced riders / Winter Alpinists. I have a Skidoo 800 ready to rock and roll ... except I havent climbed in 10 years. Been a few years since I was out past Powder Mtn but heres a picture.

The photo looks like Cayley (north ridge head-on) with Pyroclastic Peak behind. Vulcan's thumb not visible - is hidden by Pyroclastic. (Those wilth a smattering of geology will recognize that, if a peak is named Pyroclastic, it's not going to be clean granite....)
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:40am PT
oops, my bad. the comment about no names, so no ego trips is mine. it wasn't on the cover, although the post does read as if kevin had said it. sorry all. sloppy reporting....
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:42am PT
Oh boy BruceM yer gonna open a whole NEW can o' worms by mentionin' the snomo word :-D .


I'm gonna duck 'n run now ........





Oh, and Jim I'm only gonna attend if you actually get up on the table and SLAM that post :-D . Hey , I didit here in the privacy of my own home. Hee heee heeeee.........

bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:54am PT
Oh Vulcans Thumb is behind Pyrocastic, okay my mistake. Well I have the approach dialed in, in fact seems I overshot Devils thumb that trip. Definitely a full day trip from Brandywine maybe more to climb it. Of course I am hardly up for a chostastic Winter FA, ....

Uhmm is there a problem with snowmobiles ? I have been out of the loop for a while .... Does trying to save Bute Inlet give me carbon credits for my sled ? Except we used a helicopter and a Cessna at Bute ... oh boy I can't seem to do much right.

Cayley viewd from the North
Cayley viewd from the North
Credit: bmacd
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 03:03am PT
Ah okay found my shot of Vulcans Thumb, I believe ...
Vulcans Thumb, Pyroclastic and Cayley all behind hill in foreground
Vulcans Thumb, Pyroclastic and Cayley all behind hill in foreground
Credit: bmacd
click photo to enlarge
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 09:01am PT
is there a problem with snowmobiles?

hahaha ... such undersatement! good one Bruce!

you should go to the next BCMC meeting and pop that question. That'd be like going to a tea party to discuss social programs.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 09:09am PT
how about we keep the water and send them vulcans thumb. hell we'll even throw in all our old mine tailings.

Incidentally, vulcans thumb east face offers the best chance of success- all on steep snow. probably best at night in spring on a bomber crust. It looks totally reasonable, even soloable. the only real problem is having listening to the constant drone of snowmobiles
Chief

climber
Apr 13, 2010 - 10:15am PT

Another full on guidebook botch. If it was truly an egoless guidebook the authors name should be absent as well. Kevin what are you thinking ???
Dismiss the people who had the wherewithal to put the route up by excluding them from the guidebook is a feature ? I think not. It is pure disrespect.

Bruce, thank you for having the balls to call Kevin on his bullsh#t, revisionist, egregiously inaccurate and narrow interpretation of other peoples efforts.

His description of Cruel Shoes and Northern Lights relegate my involvement to that of virtual "also ran" rather than the guy that did the first ascent.
I also call bullshit on his claim that Loeks and Putnam got to the left side free from Merci Me before I did.

Sorry to go off on a tangent here folks but Bruce hit a long standing sore spot.
Kevin has chosen to arbitrarily misrepresent or qualify many peoples accomplishments in his guidebooks and I'm sick of it and speaking out.

Perry Beckham
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 10:34am PT
nice drinking song jim

i love the truth is for wankers part
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 11:56am PT
Look at how much the Americans value their history of climbs and climbers who put them up. Parts of this forum are a passionate testament to those pioneers. Imagine what Steve Grossman or Clint Cummins would have to say about a yosemite guidebook with no mention of who the first ascentionists are. Hartouni has everyone in a searchable database.

Anders if you want a book project forget climbing in the 70's at Squamish and consider chronicling the people who explored the coast range right up to whats going on now out there. You will have a much broader target audience.

Bruce Kay what do you think the relief is on the east face of Vulcans thumb ? The final tower looks awful, our own version of the rockies except probably far far worse. Some sledder should go out there and shoot a few HD images of the east face and drop them off at the climbing shop in Squish to rile up the new blood.

Lake Lovely Water was where I hooked up with a very large breasted Exotic french Canadian girl .... something in the water ? Definitely so - Lake Firewater ....

Perry thanks for the morning wake-up call ! Guidebooks eventually form part of the historical record, their authors perhaps don't always realize their responsibilities at the time.

Garabaldi from the north, 1978 when I was a glaciological field techni...
Garabaldi from the north, 1978 when I was a glaciological field technician working out of Sentinel Bay, Garabaldi Lake.
Credit: bmacd
click for larger image

We climbed Garabaldi from Sentinel Bay once, that was a slog ...

klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 13, 2010 - 12:21pm PT
Look at how much the Americans value their history of climbs and climbers who put them up.

This is correct, if by "Americans" you mean roughly three dozen fat, aging, cranky alcoholics most of whom would never even consider throwing down retail for a new paperback edition of practically anything.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 01:44pm PT
that hanging serac on Garibaldi is now about half the size as your 1978 pic.

vulcans pile is often completely white top to bottom on the east face and it looks a bit like some peruvian wild thing. spring melt freeze is the time i tell you. just covertly pass arround a shot of it in the grandwall boulders mid may and i'd bet the pad people would be all over it like flies. no doubt.

good going on the going on up at lake lovely lady. i guess it depends on who you run into eh?
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 02:37pm PT
Guide books are part of the historical record so discussing this here is not OT or Taboo.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 13, 2010 - 03:01pm PT
Look at how much the Americans value their history of climbs and climbers who put them up.

We used to value our history in Canada, too. Maybe even moreso than the Americans. The trend toward ignoring history, or pretending it isn't relevant, is sad.

Maybe on a sport crag where all that's involved is putting up one more line of bolts among dozens, the name of the bolter isn't all that important. Or maybe it is, even then.

But any of us who has spent the hundred hours per pitch required to prepare a route at Squamish, or expended the sweat and blood required to get onto something new in the Coast Range, has got to be insulted by the depersonalization of our efforts.

No guidebook author is ever going to do the job perfectly. But most try. I hope the idea of leaving out the history that goes with our names dies quickly.

D
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 13, 2010 - 08:49pm PT
We seem to have several tangents going at once, and I can only pop by occasionally.

I once heard, second or third hand, that the rift in the BCMC in the 1920s had in part to do with Saturday night activities at the cabin on Grouse offending some of the more prim and proper members. I wonder if that, plus perhaps the usual personality clashes, precipitated the schism? It may also be that Tom Fyles was thought by a few to be overbearing - that is, too overbearing for a 'mere' postie, in those still class-ridden times. Certainly the local ACC was long seen as the establishment organization, and the BCMC a more egalitarian group. Though such generalizations have less meaning than they used to.

A history of the first 40 - 50 years of climbing at Squamish will be enough for me, I think. Just thinking and planning and literature review, the Slab Alley project, and discussion, has taken most of a year. Hopefully someone like hard-as-nails Tricouni will take up a Coast Range history, or history of mountaineering in BC - which does include some of the Rubbly/Rocky Mountains.

I once posed the question to Oploplanax as to whether there was any unnamed or unclimbed summit visible from within the boundaries of greater Vancouver. That is, a peak showing a 50 m/100 ft contour on a map. An intriguing question. (Oploplanax is a fancy word for devil's club, one of our local ornamental shrubs.)

The Vulcan's Thumb is visible from the highway north of Squamish, and perhaps we should auction off the 'right' to its first ascent to some sucker. It might be a good fundraiser for the Climbers' Access Society.

I'll be at the BCMC social tonight, drinking my tea and eating my cookie, enduring the usual maundering. They have a valid point - snowmobiles, and motorized activities generally, are inappropriate in parks and wilderness. Mountaineering and climbing are about both means and ends. As we all know, if any means of getting to the top is acceptable, there isn't much merit in the ascent. In addition to their environmental impacts, "sledheads" seem to readily confuse means and ends.

As for history... Well, we all have our own perspective on it. Climbers being a somewhat proud, territorial, and critical bunch both helps and hinders. Also, writing climbing history is not a money-making activity, unless it's dumbed down to the tourist level, with lots of pretty photos. It is feasible to make money writing guidebooks, although with changing technology perhaps not for much longer. (Advertisements in guidebooks strike me as tacky, but maybe are now necessary.) We are fortunate at Squamish to have not one but two writers and publishers of climbing guidebooks for the area. They both produce what are overall very useful publications, and do a good job. One shows some bias, in terms of who did what when. It's annoying, in that it could easily be corrected. As Ghost observes, for a generic sport-climbing area, it may not matter much. When there is some history, it's important to try to get it right, in guidebooks and all the more so in histories.

I cringe to think of errors I've made in past writing about climbing, e.g. in the 1980 guidebook. Perhaps I was young enough then that it can be forgiven.

I haven't seen the new select guide that Hamish refers to, but am looking forward to it.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 13, 2010 - 11:22pm PT
I read once that mountains are transcendent. This is good news for all, as we focus on methods of transport to the good stuff.

I had a dream once where I was Penduluming between big wall islands in the sun.All it meant was the subconscious was telling me I was wasting time with present endeavors and needed to pull the pin in order to be free.

Guide writing must be a thankless task regardless of the income. That the Class Warrior has a grind stone for his pencil sharpener doesn't make the accomplishment of others less valid.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 13, 2010 - 11:25pm PT
the Class Warrior has already reaped what he sowed ... just as we all do
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:02am PT
There is now a link to the museum site, and a link to this SuperTopo forum thread on the website of the Anachronistic Club of Canada [ACC]. We have a spy in our midst........
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:07am PT
There is now a link to the museum site, and a link to this SuperTopo forum thread on the website of the Anachronistic Club of Canada [ACC].

I took a look at the Airborne Climbers of Canada site and didn't see any link. Can you give us a url?
Chief

climber
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:10am PT
Nice work Anders.
Jim and bm, I don't see a warrior or any class.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:12am PT
Thanks Hamie !

Don't reveal your contact,unless it's Branson's naked friend.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:17am PT
Chief sez:
Jim and bm, I don't see a warrior or any class

Touche !

We could grind this pyroclastic axe forever ....
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:11am PT
there are a lot of problems with "contemporary" history in Yosemite Valley... there has been no comprehensive guide book since 1994, probably 1000s of climbs are undocumented, little of this has reported in the climbing journals because most of this development doesn't reach the level of notoriety.

Who ever wants to write whatever history they think they can, should. The development of the 70s, now 40 years ago, will be lost as that generation of climbers comes to an end.

Canadian climbing has a long, proud history, and it should be told... there are wonderful stories held by just a relatively few climbers. I don't know how to implore you all enough.... but to say that the only stories that will survive are the ones you write down. Perhaps a few of the spoken stories will be recalled and written by those young ones who have heard them and piece them together, but once their attention turns to recording history, as ours did when we got old, they will wish they knew more.

It doesn't matter in the larger scheme of things, of course, but it is something we once did, it was the way we decided to spend a large part of our lives. It would be a wonderful legacy to pass those stories along.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:56am PT
and remember, as jim pointed out, the truth is for wankers
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:14am PT
You gotta love this Ed guy. Well said.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:43pm PT
I wonder who the ACC 'mole' is?
MH2

climber
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:50pm PT
No FA names? Damn! They often give more useful information about a route than the rest of it.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:11pm PT
ANders look for someone with large claws on hands that have a lateral rotation and a weird star-type protuberance around their nose.
There's yer mole.

But to get this thread possibly back on track, I feel strongly that the history of climbing is the sum of the stories told by the people doing the climbing. Any historian worthwhile reading will do a lotta legwork in interviewing the various players and following their leads as to who did what, when , how and possibly even why.

Sorting the wheat from the chaff then becomes a game of listening to those stories and cross-referrencing notes from various sources. Players will emerge .... or not. Some stories will endure - like Daryl's Yosemite trip that ended at Stoney Creek, the legacy of Eric Weinstein, Perry's Cruel Shoes, or the first time Peter & Hamish did multiple laps on the Grand.

Other things, like the wake of pissed off people left behind by a certain guidebook writer, will also endure and a good historian will be able to figure that out too.



Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:18pm PT
Canadian climbing has a long, proud history, and it should be told...

Some of it has been told. I was lucky enough to be part of a project, dreamed up by Bruce Fairley, that eventually became "The Canadian Mountaineering Anthology". We picked stories that we hoped would tell the tale of 100 years of climbing and got them out in a book. The publication was financed by the ACC, and a quick look at Amazon confirms that it is still in print and available.

Needless to say, one book, even a relatively fat one like this, can't come anywhere close to telling all the stories that need to be told. But we did what we could, and maybe now it's time for someone to get the ball rolling for Volume II.

D

And, in case any of you are wondering, we didn't write the stories ourselves, but dug up stories previously published in various places, and used them as they were originally written. We tried to add some commentary, to give readers a bit of background, but the stories really do speak for themselves.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:21pm PT
Any comments on Chic Scott's book "Pushing the Limits: the Story of Canadaian Mountaineering"?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:36pm PT
^^^ I have a story in that anthology. It is, of all things, a trip report & I blame David ( Ghost ) fer it being there. DUnno if Fairly Bruce had a hand in that or what.

It was funny that Dave asked that he put the story in & I said sure. The book took fekkin' years to publish :-D hahahah through which time I totally forgot both about the story and that I'd agreed to the thing being in there.

And then when it was ( finally ( snicker guffaw ) ) published and I got a FREE copy ( cos I was a contributer ) I was really surprised and , like, saying " how come I get a free copy ? " and Dave said ".........oh dear you are dumber then the food you eat" or something like that.

Ain't that rite Davey ?

Arright, Volume 2 would be a great idea. But who wants to read thru ALL THOSE JOURNALS to dig up the diamonds ? Not me, thatsfer sure ; I'm too lazy.

Edit for Glenn's post above - I greatly admire the amount of research Chic did for his book - he interviewed ( taped / video ) some 90 climbers coast to coast to coast. While I am sure there are some names and stories he missed out on, the compendium of information he gathered now sits in the Whyte Museum for anybody in the future who wants to listen to climbers babble on.

Any history should, at very least, start like this - by interviewing those responsible ( or to blame :0 )
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:12pm PT
Chic's interviews would do well to be on Youtube, more accessible than where they are now
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:19pm PT
Any of the stories written by Hugh Burton in the Canadian Alpine Journal really take you there.
My favorite is Squamish Hardcore on McKinley, a good laugh.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:19pm PT
Any historian worthwhile reading will do a lotta legwork in interviewing the various players and following their leads as to who did what, when , how and possibly even why.

Sorting the wheat from the chaff then becomes a game of listening to those stories and cross-referrencing notes from various sources.

It sound so easy.

I'm sure that reconciling Kevin's interview with Perry's interview will be a pleasant afternoon, with an outcome guaranteed to make everyone happy.

Gee Anders, what r ya waitin for?
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:15pm PT
I still don't understand how Chic Scott f*#ked up so badly as to totally miss, or dismiss, or not even really mention Hank Mather in his Pushing the Limits book
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:19pm PT
And Perry, I don't know about Loeks and Putnam but the FFA of the Left Side in the latest McLane guides goes to Nic Taylor and Paul Peart (visiting Australians) in '75. The same info is also given in the CAJ as I recall. Nic Taylor was an Australian hotshot i believe? (there's a couple period pics of him in Yosemite Climber I think too)
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:25pm PT
Yes, Kerwin - writing guidebooks and histories is a sure bet for making friends. :-)

The FFA of the left side of the Split Pillar was by visiting Australian Nic Taylor and Peter Peart, in 1975. Peter had emigrated from Australia to Canada in 1970 or so, and was quite active. I knew him through the BCMC, and also we had some classes together in 1975, and he mentioned his and Nic's adventure to me. (Really.) I have several times attempted to correct the "Paul" bit, without success. Peter still lives here, on Bowen Island - he's an engineer. Nic was here on a road trip - I believe the first Australian to pass this way on a visit may have been Chris Baxter, in 1972.

There was some skepticism about Nic and Peter's ascent, in that Peter was more into mountaineering, and Nic not well known. But Nic went on to do some impressive climbs in Australia and Yosemite, offering additional proof. I'm reasonably sure that Peter jumared the crux, or at least had a tight rope.

Peter patiently belayed me on the FA of A Question of Balance, in 1977. That is, while I tiptoed about, drilled bolts, and got scared.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:33pm PT
Yes, Kerwin - writing guidebooks and histories is a sure bet for making friends. :-)

And don't forget the part about gettin rich.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:51pm PT
I always thought it was Bill Price who ticked left side. or maybe that was due to the foriegn angle.

Perry- were you wrangling it? did you get snaked?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:52pm PT
Oplo - Hank would have probably been an oversight and not an omission. Chic is a Rockies guy and he depended upon the Coast Range people to lead him from one person to the next and point him in the direction of the people with the stories.
He did, however, parse the people involved as to what he felt they had contributed so ultimately the reasons Mather was not included rest with Chic - and I can't speak to that.
I'm not an apologist for Chic but to suggest he made decisions and not everyone might agree with them.


EDIT - Bruce - if Bill Price ticked the L Side it would 'a been in '79 - I think that was his and Big Wally's trip to Squash when he did the 2nd ascent of Sentry Box.
Could'a been '80 but no later then that.


L Side of the pillar is big, mean and really really hard. It's a phenomenal tick for the Aussies in the mid-70's.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 14, 2010 - 05:03pm PT
Jim Campbell's 1985 topo guide has the FA of the so-called "Grand Wazoo" by Dick Culbert and Tim Auger in 1972. The Grand Wazoo was (I believe) a Daryl name which never caught on for the left side of the Pillar, followed by a short pitch linking to the ledge at the top of the Pillar. Perhaps from a time when Nic's ascent wasn't given credence.

Dick was involved in Ten Years After in 1970 (not 1971), and so would have known how to get to the base of the left side via Mercy Me and the traverse. Jim's guide incorrectly reports the FFA of the "Grand Wazoo to Grand Wall" being by Bill Price, Daryl Hatten and Mike Boris in 1978. That more accurately was the second free ascent of the left side, with the new linkup pitch. (Later further confused by the "Grinning Weasel".)

I wonder if Peter P has photos from the left side?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 05:21pm PT
Grinning Weasel sounds like a Croft name. Whut was it ?

IIRC there was a number of heinous bolts connecting to the base of the L side back in the day. I know I was dragged up that thing once.....it could'a been twice . I recall the bottom of the L side being very steep & weirdly protected. That, and the pillar appeared to be held on at the bottom by just that little tinky portion of rock ; the L side crack extended down and to the right and gave us the shivers the entire pillar was, in fact, detached.

Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 14, 2010 - 06:13pm PT
Chic not only missed Hank Mather, he missed Leif-Norman Patterson. Both are worthy of inclusion, but he only had so much space, and it was a judgement call on his part.
Chief

climber
Apr 14, 2010 - 11:13pm PT
OK, I'm watching playoff hockey and drinking while posting so bear with me.
My reference wasn't to the Left Side itself but rather, getting to it from Merci Me. When Nic and Bill did it they accessed it by the BC bolt ladders because few people thought of climbing from Merci Me to the Pillar back then. The legendary Les McDonald apparently explored this area.
Both Nic and Bill were belayed from right under the Left Side roof.

Tom Gibson and George Manson climbed from Ten Tears After over to within a few bolts of the Pillar from Merci Me back in 80ish and told me with a couple pins and a bolt it might go free to the ladder. I placed a bolt to protect the shortcut halfway up pitch two of Merci Me and led the traverse from TYA to the big ledge well below the Left Side placing pins free on lead. Someone later pulled the pins and placed a couple bolts. Botch job. After placing a high protection bolt off the ledge, I climbed the twenty feet or so of poorly protected 11a face from the ledge to the roof.

The moves from the Left Side to the Right Side belay were beyond me (still are) till Peter "found" a secret foothold which later fell off. (12b now I think)

Linking Merci Me to the Left Side free meant that the Grand now went free to the top of the Sword via the Left Side and that meant a lot to me then and still does now.
Kevin McLane insists Dave Loeks and Bill Putnam did this previously.
I saw no evidence and they've never corroborated his story so till then I call bullsh#t.
Thanks, back to the playoffs.

Perry
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 12:44am PT
The moves from the Left Side to the Right Side belay were beyond me (still are) till Peter "found" a secret foothold which later fell off. (12b now I think)

I was watching Dean Hart thru binoculars as he stepped onto that foothold. A few moments later the foot hold blew, Dean popped off and I saw the former foot hold tumble to the ground. But this was them going for the Left Side from the tree belay, so maybe I am talking about some thing else. Should I post a picture ? I might have something somewhere ...

Nice work on the linkage Perry, I was not aware it was you who established the traverse.
Chief

climber
Apr 15, 2010 - 12:48am PT
Thanks Bruce, my point exactly.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 01:02am PT
"found" = chipped ?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 15, 2010 - 01:15am PT
Which Peter ? If it was Croft then no, he didn't chip. Not that I recall at any rate........
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 15, 2010 - 01:24am PT
I'll eventually ask Dick and Tim how they got to the left side in 1972, also Peter how they did it in 1975. Daryl and Eric climbed the bolt ladders to get to the right side when they freed it, and Eric and I did Mercy Me in 1974 without any discussion as to going across from there - although as noted, Steve, Hugh and Dick somehow got partway over in 1970. Loeks and Putnam tried to scoop Eric and Daryl on the right side, and repeated it not long after. I don't recall anything unusual about how they got there, and the first mention of people going across from Mercy Me was maybe in the late 1970s (?).
Chief

climber
Apr 15, 2010 - 09:51am PT
It was Peter Croft and he told me he just "tapped a loose flake with a carabiner" and voila, nice foothold. Later the rest of the little flake fell off

Ten Years After was accessed from the top of Merci Me via a downward right traverse involving some aid. I don't know of anyone continuing right to the ladders although from TYA a short lower and pendulum would get you to the last fifty feet of BC ladders.

While there's lots I don't know about anything much less Squamish history, I can say that nobody climbed over to the Pillar free via Merci Me and those pin protected ledges before I did it on Tom and George's recommendation.
If there's something more than hearsay that proves me wrong, I'll fess up, say I was wrong and buy someone a beer. Till then, I'm loudly calling BS on Kevin's guides and not just on this matter.

Regards,

Perry
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:03am PT
Perry, what is the history of the "Daily Planet" ? I remember Hamish had a fair bit to say about it.

Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:07am PT
all right... i'm gonna pull up a chair and grab a beer - this oughta be good
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:12am PT
The moves from the Left Side to the Right Side belay were beyond me (still are) till Peter "found" a secret foothold which later fell off. (12b now I think)

Heh.

That was my favorite move on GW. There was a buttonhead w/o a hanger right at that move. That foothold was positive, but not really big enough to switch feet easily. Two sidepulls for the hands.

I grabbed the sidepulls, put my right foot on that foothold, hooked my left toe back under the corner/roof, then let go both hands and leaned over to grab the belay ledge. Asked for slack and then cut loose.

When Scott followed he worked the same beta, got into that sidescale position, with the exposure under him, and reached for the ledge-- but he was about a foot short. Heh.

I really liked that Merci Me to R. SP section. It had the first really exposed feeling moves on the climb.

Now exfoliated, along with the rest of my memories.

Chief

climber
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:31am PT
The history of the Daily Planet is complex and colorful and at the time, it seemed like much was at stake. It's a subject that's deserving of it's own thread. Likewise for my beef with Kevin's guidebooks and his penchant for historical revisionism.

It's impossible for any guide book to be complete as it's outdated as soon as it's printed. It's hard to tell the whole story in a way that will satisfy everyone.
Guide books don't have to tell the whole story but they do have to tell the truth.
There's lots of good examples.

Back to Mighty's thread.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:38am PT
Damn. oh well, back to work
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:46am PT
how about Sean Douerty's "Selected Sandbags of the Canadian Rockies"? You gotta admit - it keeps you on your toes and gives us plenty of fodder to complain about.

I always liked Howie Richardsons line in a CAJ article on Skaha, about somebody gluing holds on a route: "Thanks Jeremy, we were running out of things to talk about!"
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 15, 2010 - 12:06pm PT
A point of clarification. Upthread [Lonely Planet] bmacd is referring to Hamish F, and not to me. What a phenom. Wish I could have climbed like that. Dang!!!
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 01:16pm PT
Darnit, we just dragged out Peter Crofts dirty laundry on a historical thread and Chief bows out gracefully on more history lessons ...

Perhaps some grievances are best forgotten, lest they make us ill

Of course subject matter buried as thread drift, few would suspect to look here
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 15, 2010 - 01:45pm PT
Hamie:
Bmacd is referring to Hamish F, and not to me. What a phenom. Wish I could have climbed like that. Dang!!!

You are being a bit modest here; your climbing was never too shabby, and your climbing record speaks for itself.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 15, 2010 - 02:48pm PT
I"m with Glenn, Hamie has MUTCH to be proud of .........as does the other Hamish.

Well, dangnabbit, I prolly belayed Croft when he 'tapped that hold' and I don't remember. Seriously I don't.
If it came down to a problem of being too short, then I was prolly really too much way too short. Don't know there was any runt shorter then me at Squash 'cept for people climbing with their 8 year olds.

:-D

I like that Perry said the Daily Planet was a colourful first ascent and, at the time a lot seemed to be at stake. That's it about climbing , eh? Much ado about climbing ?

Hard to believe that was 25 years ago.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 15, 2010 - 04:02pm PT
You mean CONTROVERSIAL CORNER right? And it was a big prize then as it would be now.
Chief

climber
Apr 15, 2010 - 04:35pm PT
Tami and Jim,

Re the foothold, I got it straight from the great Pedro Croftini himself.
And nobody's calling it chipping, he just knocked off a loose flake with a wee tap of a biner.

The Planet was a defining time for our Squamish tribe and it's hard to see it clearly till you get a decade or two away from it. Everyone of us that toiled and scrapped over that route can be proud of a great climb and friendships that endure to this day.

In alphabetical order the FA credits go something like this;

Mike Beaubien
Perry Beckham
Peter Croft
Hamish Fraser
Blake Robinson
Brooke Sandahl
John Simpson

Respectfuly,

PB
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 15, 2010 - 05:37pm PT
:-) Perry !!! Great post !

BTW - I have pix of the Daily Planet "FA" in my Red Book - pix of Peter & Haggis. Not sure if anybody else was with them Mike B perhaps ?
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 08:48pm PT
Blake Robinson nabbed the almost FA of the planet- right on blake!

Hamish - i seem to recall meeting you at the plummer hut and informing you that Peter, Hamish and Greg had just freed U wall, whereupon you immediately spat out your soup and started laughing histerically

you wouldn't believe how hard it is to write this having lost all my reading glasses
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 08:50pm PT
I'm a shyte disturber ....

Chief, Congrats to you all. I got up an early version of the Planet with Hamish a couple times. Spectacular route
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 15, 2010 - 10:58pm PT
Serl...

So I'm struggling in the sun, swimming with axes,crampons and whatever offers purchase on some dumb blob of snow on a glacier some where. Don is holding the liberally anchored rope.

This was in a time when various North Western climbers were making a name in the Himalayas and meeting with grief as well a success.

Hmm.......says Don, why do people named Jim have such trouble with crevasses ?
You SOB! I silently muttered through clenched teeth.

HAHAHAHAHA ! ! !
Chief

climber
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:05pm PT
Brooke and I didn't bring a camera when we did the first ascent of The Daily Planet so I can't figure out how there could be pictures of the FA.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:12pm PT
So I'm struggling in the sun, swimming with axes,crampons and whatever offers purchase on some dumb blob of snow on a glacier some where. Don is holding the liberally anchored rope.

Same song, different verse. Axes and crampons, and Don holding the rope, but mid winter and no swimming. Just a perfect day out on the Lions

Lion in winter
Lion in winter
Credit: Ghost
Todd Eastman

climber
Bellingham, WA
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:13pm PT
As I drove up to ski at Cypress (Hollyburn to some) today, I could swear I could hear the yelling about BC climbing history wafting in the warm spring air...
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:17pm PT
If you were cross-country skiing, it would have been on Hollyburn Ridge. If downhill, on Mount Strachan (pronounced, Scottish-style, as "Struan") or Black Mountain. No "Cypress Mountains" anywhere in the neighbourhood.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:18pm PT
Brooke and I didn't bring a camera when we did the first ascent of The Daily Planet so I can't figure out how there could be pictures of the FA.

No worries Chief the pad people pushed the route 20 feet higher and made a music video of the ascent, renamed the route and posted it all to Utube last summer
Todd Eastman

climber
Bellingham, WA
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:31pm PT
I was in fact xc schlepping on the sides of Hollyburn in the quickly slowing glop. I could hear the ghosts of long-gone ACC members on the updrafts...
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:42pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#153909
You guys have all seen these before, though there aren't nearly as many around as there used to be. Where is it from? Who placed it? When?

Here's another fairly recent photo of it, attached to its bolt.
photo not found
Missing photo ID#153910
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 15, 2010 - 11:47pm PT
Still Tod,

It is a great spring day today and I'm pissed that my laundry could not wait. It's shorts and T-shirt while skiing time !!!!
Jim
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 16, 2010 - 12:30am PT
i just thought of another good thread - kevin Maclane gear. that bolt hanger made me think of it.

anybody remember his 2 bolt / one hanger rig on hellfire wall? or how about that sawed offangle on el indio? or filed down tri cams on take no prisoners?
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 16, 2010 - 01:04am PT
Hint: Few if any posters to this thread clipped the hangar when it was attached to the bolt, but almost all have been within 10 m of it.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 16, 2010 - 01:07am PT
Slab Alley?
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 16, 2010 - 01:10am PT
HAHAHAHA Bruce,

Yes, the gear that shall not speak it's name. HAHAHAHA MWAH HAHAHA !
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 16, 2010 - 01:53am PT
Perry I did have "FA" in quotation marks.

That was fer a reason.

I have no strong memories of the controversy but that there WAS one........and , 25 yrs later, the pix are what they are : some guys climbing a route at Squamish.

Butt shots mostly with a fairly good one of HamishF on the undercling pitch.

Chief

climber
Apr 16, 2010 - 09:49am PT
Tami, sorry for missing the quotation marks, post those pictures!

Anders I've got a bunch of hangers just like that hanging by the door.
Relics of the same vintage, probably crafted and placed by the same guys.
Man the stories they'd tell if they could talk!
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 16, 2010 - 11:12am PT
If I remember correctly, there was a short bolt ladder on Slab Alley that had some of those hangers. And, again if I remember correctly, Les Priest (a climber who disappeared from the scene decades ago) fell while directly above that ladder and slit himself open on one of the hangers. Early 70s I think.

And since I was never part of the Daily Planet thing, in fact didn't even know there was a "thing" about it, I'd love to hear some stories.
Chief

climber
Apr 16, 2010 - 12:04pm PT
Those angle stock hangers did make good footholds.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 16, 2010 - 12:41pm PT
The Planet was a defining time for our Squamish tribe and it's hard to see it clearly till you get a decade or two away from it. Everyone of us that toiled and scrapped over that route can be proud of a great climb and friendships that endure to this day.

In alphabetical order the FA credits go something like this;

Mike Beaubien
Perry Beckham
Peter Croft
Hamish Fraser
Blake Robinson
Brooke Sandahl
John Simpson

Respectfuly,

PB

Wow, Perry can post as elegantly as he climbs. Seriously, that's pretty graceful.



Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 16, 2010 - 01:27pm PT
Will try post the pix buttit'll be a few days. I'll next get time to try fork around with it on Sunday or Monday :-)

Hi ho hi ho....
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 16, 2010 - 04:41pm PT
Here's another photo of that pesky bolt, where it lived until recently.
photo not found
Missing photo ID#154086
(True angle 10 - 15 degrees greater than it appears.)

And here are photos of another fine piece of gear, which everyone on this thread probably clipped into at some time. Removed some years ago, but from what climb?
photo not found
Missing photo ID#154087
photo not found
Missing photo ID#154088

Chief: Those angle stock hangers did make good footholds.

In the purely theoretical sense, of course. They might have made good footholds, but we never stood on them, or held onto them. The very farthest thing from our thoughts.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 16, 2010 - 04:42pm PT
the pin on apron strings?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 16, 2010 - 10:52pm PT
Or perhaps on Snake - traverse R under large o/hang?
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 16, 2010 - 10:59pm PT
Maybe it was shoved up into that overlap on Pressed Hams.
Cloudraker

Big Wall climber
BC
Apr 16, 2010 - 10:59pm PT
squamish buttress?
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 16, 2010 - 11:11pm PT
The bolt looks to be on the last pitch of Slab Alley where it cuts left across to Banana Peel.
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Apr 16, 2010 - 11:32pm PT
that pin is the one from the banana peel flake crux isn't it?
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 17, 2010 - 12:28am PT
Funny you should mention Banana Peel. Done by Dan Tate and Barry Hagen in 1965. Now the scene of much whining at the moderate runout slabs that the route features, although there is one bolt. But that bolt apparently wasn't placed on the first ascent.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 17, 2010 - 01:29am PT
Mighty Hiker: Funny you should mention Banana Peel. Done by Dan Tate and Barry Hagen in 1965. Now the scene of endless whining at the moderate runout slabs that the route features, although there is one bolt. But that bolt apparently wasn't placed on the first ascent.

This is correct: there was no bolt on the first few ascents. I was up there a few weeks after the first ascent, went up a ways and didn't care for what I saw. So I backed off and we did something else. I went back a few weeks later, did it with no problems. Still no bolt. The bolt showed up within a year, but nobody ever took "credit" for it and I never found out who it was. I had my suspicions but at this late date I can't remember who I thought the culprits were.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Apr 17, 2010 - 01:40am PT
assuming the mountain horizon in the background sets the horizontal...

MH2

climber
Apr 17, 2010 - 08:46pm PT
Thanks for the slightly out-of-place comments on the Left Side and Daily Planet. The Daily Planet did make a splash at the time. I remember getting an enthusiastic recommendation from Uli and Ira Leuthasser in Seattle, mid-80s. The Left Side should get more traffic and that first 20 feet or so to the roof where the crack starts is hard and thinly protected and considered by some to be the technical crux. The talk about moving from the Left Side to the Right Side confused me but I guess it is about making the looong reach across to the base of the Split Pillar, just up and left of the 3-bolt ladder, now protected by a solid newish bolt and used by Scot Cosgrove on the free ascent. There is also a step-across from the top of the Left Side to the ledge at the top of the Split Pillar. Isn't that still 5.9?
MH2

climber
Apr 17, 2010 - 08:50pm PT
Also about 10 m distant from a well-beaten path





Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 17, 2010 - 09:24pm PT
The Left Side of The Split Pillar is a masterpiece of granite architecture and gloves thrown challenge.

The meat of the matter is obvious, just pass the 30' of sniveling RP protected 5-10 high step gateway to the [non intimidating] start and the next 120' of fingers through rattly to hands to offwidth on a plumb wall, should make for laughter.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 17, 2010 - 10:08pm PT
Jim that's gotta be the best description of a Squash route since Smaill put pen to paper in '75.

At least yer not carryin' "the usual shoulder-bruising wall load"

:-B
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 17, 2010 - 10:16pm PT
And that route doesn't turn into a veritable bag of liver in the rain either....
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 17, 2010 - 10:25pm PT
I recall feeling like a veritable bag of liver when it was dry, I'd hate to try it out in the rain!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 18, 2010 - 12:15am PT
Ding ding ding! OK, Tricouni wins the prize for where the hanger came from. Maybe he should have been DQed - those who know too much. It's from the second-last pitch of Slab Alley before Broadway, on the original route - where it traversed left into what is now the last pitch of Banana Peel. But he hasn't told us when it was placed, or by whom. (The original line of Slab Alley also included what is now Boomstick Crack.)

And the pin was from the fourth (or so) pitch of Banana Peel, where there's a short corner crack in a steep wall. It was there in September 1973, if not earlier, and still there in August 2000 when I removed it. Quite easily, I should mention - oddly, for all the fuss some climbers make about safety, no one seems to have bothered checking it for years. A couple taps and a tug. About 1/3 of the metal had eroded away.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 12:38am PT
ok guys, enough aproneering, back to the left side!!!!!!!!!

anyone hear the story of bobby alison with kevin Mclane snapping pictures?
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 12:43am PT
Tell it to us Bruce !
We are done with slab alley for sure ....

I am still chuffed McLane refused to publish my uber classic backside route "Too Drunk to Fukk" in his original guide

Bruce can you get me into to Toba so I can do a little Bigfoot hunting ? Do they accept guests up there ? Drop me off in the woods with my night vision cameras for a few days .... fuk all going on at Bute in terms of Sasquatch as far as I could tell.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 18, 2010 - 12:48am PT
Philistines!

There's a lot of information about the Slab Alley restoration at http://www.squamishclimbing.com/squamish_climbing_bb/viewtopic.php?t=2522

Not a burly, manly route perhaps, but one with a lot of history, which it would be good to see more climbing.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 18, 2010 - 01:31am PT
At one time, Slab Alley was one of the 2 or 3 most popular climbs at Squamish. Routes come and go and come again in popularity. For non-athletic types like me, it was a pleasant outing and I'm glad it's getting rehabilitated.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 09:23am PT
there was a couple of sasquatch here but they kept getting into the garbage so we had to shoot em

sorry man

Anders, of course there's lotsa good apron stories, like paul kindree's solo slide for life, or how about grim reaper in robbins boots... pony up with the tales

Kevin decided he needed a rad shot of a athelete on the left side so he recruited BA sporting lycra tights. Bobby goes up there and swiftly dispatches the crux, then starts slowing down a bit through the fist section. He had neglected bring anything bigger than a number 4 friend so that went in at the halfway mark.

he gets to the offwidth and, having never really offwidthed anything, he commits to the lieback.
I have tried that lieback and thought it quite insecure and rounded so backed down and reverted to OW. With your last piece 60 feet below and sporting a pump, i shudder to think what happened next.

according to kevin BA realized the error of his ways too late. Bobby starts breathing hard, shaking out and knitting his brow. Bobby fortunately can really bear down however when the chips are down - must be his background in downhill racing. He realizes its do or die so off he goes slapping, pawing rattling and snorting up the final bulge up to the thank god hand jam

kevin said he didn't know whether to puke, go for the glory shot or throw him his rope.
Fortunately it never came to either. The rsult picture wound up on the cover of one of the 90's CAJ
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 09:26am PT
I'll ask about guests in toba.

I mentioned to perry earlier that they might be warm pr wise if they sensed no hostility.

Tami - there's an article in tyee.ca about cirkids. is that the show you're involved in?
Chief

climber
Apr 18, 2010 - 12:32pm PT
There was a time when I had the Left Side pretty dialed.
Linking the Left Side to The Roman Chimneys seemed like good training for the really hard Valley routes. Keep the rack light, move fast etc.
So one set of Friends to #4 should be plenty.
Past the bad green RPs, up under the roof, finesse the rattles, pose on the bomber hands and swing into the cupped hand shuffle. Save the #4 till it just fits the widening crack and try to sneak by. Then I swing into the handstacks, cruise along for a bit then look down in horror to see that the #4 is inverted and useless. I'm probably a solid 40 feet above the #3.5 which would start slowing me down as I hit the slab. I still have another twenty feet of climbing to get past the 10a OW crux. Somehow I kept it together and got into the upper 5.9 crack with zero gear for the next twenty feet to the anchor. Man, was I relieved to clip in!
Don't underestimate the 80 feet of 10a fluff above the thin hands crux.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 01:28pm PT
the famous Beckam exacto- rack

perry -you talked to JH lately? Anders said his dad just passed away
Chief

climber
Apr 18, 2010 - 01:54pm PT
bk, yes and yes.
Why don't we have a beer over a hockey game?
And how about that flake Luongo?
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 02:15pm PT
I'm out on parole next week. i'll give you a shout.

did he blow it last night? i missed it
Chief

climber
Apr 18, 2010 - 02:30pm PT
Gave up a two nothing lead, allowed the OT winner.
Probably the Canuck's greatest liability.
gf

climber
Apr 18, 2010 - 02:43pm PT
More on left side thread drift and extraneous bolts....
In April 82 PC and I added an extension onto the left side of the sword, aka The Grinning Weasel, by aiding a crack that started at the top of the free climbing and joined into Ten Years After. This was pre-60M ropes; the 55M rig baaaarely made it to the pre-existing TYA station; in fact PC clipped into the lower belay with slings and stood up in aiders to give enough cordage for a yours truly to squeeze a couple clove hitches in on arrival. Meanwhile the peanut gallery down on psyche ledge were in high dudgeon about my potentially coming up short and desecrating the final moves of the expanding flake in TYA. That was avoided, but I still remember the burning shame I felt where I'd put in a chicken bolt at the top of the virgin thin crack I'd nailed when moving across to join into TYA.
That night I was psyched to sleep in the home made ledge that Hamish had done a lot of the work on, in particular because pc had a hamock with no spreader bars. During construction of said ledge, and in a stroke of engineering genius that I am well known for amongst my friends, I suggested the mid point section point on the alum tubes could be rigged up with softwood dowels. A test in the backyard confirmed my smarts and so a couple days later when the moment of glory came, I jumped onto the ledge which promptly folded in two. PC looked at me with a sardonic grin and enquired if "they taught you that in college"; I passed the night in what best could be described as an early version of what became known as a Crazy Creek Chair. The next day we continued onward linking TYA into Humpty Dumpty, in a rare display of aid climbing finess PC made up for my sins of the previous day with some fancy footwork to avoid placing more bolts.
There, 28 yrs later and I've finally fessed up!
gf
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 18, 2010 - 02:50pm PT
Okay Nails, you're in the cross-hairs today. Better duck now. A few days ago, Tami mentioned 'Sentry Box'. This climb is listed as 'Artificial Land' FA Baldwin/Cooper 6.4 [that's A2 for the children] in Baldwin's hand-written guide. I just looked at it again. However it is listed as 'Sentry Box' in your green guide, the first one published. So how/who/why/when was the name changed? This has puzzled/bugged me for years. Decades! Anders, perhaps the truth will finally out?

I had no idea that mentioning Kevin's new guide would result in such lengthy thread drift, although it's good to read about some local stuff for a change. Apologies to Anders for hi-jacking the thread, but it's all good material for his new book. Now I know why Kevin omitted the FA names--he didn't want to get embroiled in another mega s**t-storm. Smart man.
Chief

climber
Apr 18, 2010 - 02:56pm PT
gf,

I think I one upped your transgression by putting in a bolt belay in the middle of an upper pitch of GW when I linked TYA to HD.
I was sure at the time I was exercising legitimate prerogative but in retrospect I'm not so sure.

hamie,

I was at the campfire at Psyche Ledge the day Eric freed Sentry Box and remember it like it was yesterday.
John Arts was there and had held Eric on a big whipper that rope burned Eric's arm as I recall.
Eric was pretty stoked and he never referred to the climb as anything but Sentry Box.

Respectfully,

PB
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 03:13pm PT
greg, i think one of the finer journey's up the wall is TYA face crack (aid) dyke traverse to left side (free) grinning weasel( free then aid) then rest of TYA to dance. the face cracks awesome!

now how about that john clarke tale?
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 03:14pm PT
second the motion for Greg's story of John Clarke on Mt. Bute
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 03:18pm PT
as far as bolts go how about that perry's lieback abortion?

cors you'll never catch me complaining nor anyone else i bet but i always thought that was an interesting example of a bolted offwidth.

speaking of which any of you guys done polaris? 140 ft or 9" crack with a crisp lieback edge, bolts every 15 feet or so. fantstic!
Chief

climber
Apr 18, 2010 - 03:24pm PT
as far as bolts go how about that perry's lieback abortion?

I'm not sure where the line is Bruce, but I'd say you definitely crossed it with that one. Fuk you very much!

Perry Beckham
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 18, 2010 - 03:53pm PT
I'm getting popcorn fer this.

A double bill with Old Guys battlin' out who changed the damn name to Sentry Box and Slightly Younger Guys battlin' over lieback land.

Sounds like cartoon fodder.


Big Grin.


Oh, and the Cirkids artical in the Tyee was , well, a little lame. But yes, I'm on that like a fat kid on a cupcake.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 03:59pm PT
I think Bruce Kay may have been trying on some sarcastic humour ....

Perrys Lieback has already been disscussed, resolved and put to bed:
Atrocity defined - June 5/2003
http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/20466/Atrocity-defined

Perrys Lieback  Grandwall - Tim MCallister
Perrys Lieback Grandwall - Tim MCallister
Credit: bmacd
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 06:02pm PT
haha! gotcha!

like i said its cool by me. I think ethic by consensus in a well populated area is the way to go and old rigid, fossilized fundamentalist notions need to be scrutinized with suspicion. the resource is one of community and there is only a little room for individual imposition of values, especially if they deny access to the many. The grand wall and polaris are perfect places for a few judicous bolts - judicous being the operative word. Consensus ought to have something to do with removing bolts as well.

hell it sounds like that slab alley bolt has been much apreciated over the years. but how about those newer routes crowding grim reaper? someone tell the story of the Grim reaper. i never did have the guts for that one and now its too late (not that i have any guts now mind you)
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 06:43pm PT
Grim Reaper was an incomplete line. It went left instead of continuing straight up. It had a fixed copper head as the last piece of pro. Aside from swapping the copper head for a bolt we didn't change Grim Reaper to establish Teetering. Are you are talking about something other than Teetering Bruce ?
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 06:53pm PT
no not teetering.... thats an excellent addition. was that you? with carl austrom?

there's some other ones to the left, barley jobs i think . anyway it seems like there's the odd historical piece that should get some respect. but having said that, in squamish if the thing dosn't get traffic it tends to go back to nature. which in a way is perfect as whatever is not of value gets recycled. the circle of life. so grim reaper was probably destined to extinction anyway.

apparently even dream on needed rescubbing recently.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 07:09pm PT
well you learn something new every day. good route.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 18, 2010 - 07:17pm PT
Hamie:
Okay Nails, you're in the cross-hairs today. Better duck now. A few days ago, Tami mentioned 'Sentry Box'. This climb is listed as 'Artificial Land' FA Baldwin/Cooper 6.4 [that's A2 for the children] in Baldwin's hand-written guide. I just looked at it again. However it is listed as 'Sentry Box' in your green guide, the first one published. So how/who/why/when was the name changed? This has puzzled/bugged me for years. Decades! Anders, perhaps the truth will finally out?

That's a really good question and I don't know the answer for certain. In Baldwin's final, typed guidebook (the one ready for publication), it's called Artificial Land. Cooper's account of the route says "The route we ascended climbs 50 feet to a cut in a large overhang (the sentry box), ....". Baldwin also used the term "sentry box."

I did not rename routes. I named a couple (and badgered people into naming them) but I didn't rename anything that previously had a name. Seeing as I had Baldwin's typescript, I was aware of the Artificial Land name. My guess is that, after Jim's death, Cooper though that "Artificial Land" was stupid or boring and decided that "Sentry Box" would be better (I agree). He might have told Tony Cousins who told me. I don't recall ever talking to Ed about it; I'm going to email him in a couple of minutes.

I went through my pathetically sparse surviving notes from the 1967 green guide. They don't help, but I did find an interesting note I'd written on Slab Alley. (That route keeps coming up, doesn't it?). "The ascent has taken as little as 15 minutes; most parties will require upwards of 2 hours." That seems fast even for today; I wonder who did it in pre-1968 days?
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 18, 2010 - 08:06pm PT
its funny how greg dosn't want to talk about bute and JC - anybody else notice?
Maybe there's some dark secret best left under a rock

ok greg you're off the hook! the story is in an old CAJ anyway. the public story anyway.
gf

climber
Apr 19, 2010 - 12:02am PT
Bruce,
I just want to save that one for a full on JC appreciation thread-besides you hit the nail on the head re it being more or less in the public domain of the ACC journal. We need to enlist John Baldwin and a few others first to do justice for an appreciation thread for John.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 19, 2010 - 12:06am PT
Good luck gettin' Baldwin to post on this forum :-D I tried workin' Don S at his wife's big six-oh a coupl'a weeks ago & he gave me that sorta-blank stare ( you who know Don know the look :-D )

Maybe we could slag John's GUIDEBOOK to get him to sit up and take notice.

After the posts about KMclane I wonder if he lurks here.

Hee hee hee.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 19, 2010 - 12:20am PT
You know there's a biography of JC in the works...
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 19, 2010 - 01:17am PT
Bob McGowan (sp?) from Oregon was the first to work on what became Teetering on the Brink of Madness, in 1977 or 1978. Somewhere I have a letter from him about it. I don't know how far he got, perhaps above the end of the crack. He was going to call it A Slice of Life.

Sighting today at the Starbucks in Squamish: Don Serl and his daughter Ashley, who'd ridden up from Vancouver on Don's motorcycle. (He's very keen on them.) That coffee shop is a rendezvous for hordes of motorcyclists, but probably not motorcycle gangs. The sociology is fascinating.

Carl was (is?) a darn fine slab and face climber, and lives in North Carolina.

You might be quite surprised who lurks here.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 19, 2010 - 09:30am PT
lurkers should pipe up every now and then

we need the diversity
sac

Trad climber
spuzzum
Apr 19, 2010 - 10:59am PT




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qtj7QFDjH1A&feature=related

Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 19, 2010 - 11:34am PT
^^^ ???
sac

Trad climber
spuzzum
Apr 19, 2010 - 02:58pm PT
one lurker, pipin' in...

JC bump

enjoying this climber talk.

A.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 19, 2010 - 03:03pm PT
Lisa Baile is the one writing the bio of JC. I know she has a publisher but I forget who they are.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 19, 2010 - 03:35pm PT
There is now (as of last week) an official Mount John Clarke. It was formerly and informally named "Sun Peak," and it's near the head of Jervis Inlet. John took many young people into that area; it was an important place to him. I'm very pleased.

Anyways, after much hard work by a number of people over 3 years, we now have a fitting commemorative peak for him. See http://archive.ilmb.gov.bc.ca/bcgn-bin/bcg10?name=60861

Harbour Publishing will be doing Lisa's biography of John.
gf

climber
Apr 19, 2010 - 04:02pm PT
Well done Glenn, Liz and John!
Lets wait for the book publishing to launch a tribute thread?
GF
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 19, 2010 - 11:34pm PT
^^^ I second that motion. I wonder if Lisa lurks on this forum ? :-)
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 20, 2010 - 12:00am PT
Let's leave the JC appreciation thread for the book launch (might rustle up a few book sales, too). But if anyone on this forum has JC stories, I know that Lisa would like to hear them. Same with photos. She's over in Ireland right now, researching John's roots.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
May 1, 2010 - 01:06pm PT
The legendary outdoorsman known as Mountain Goat or Xwexwselkn to the Squamish First Nation for his tussled white hair and climbing skills has officially been honoured with a mountain in his name on B.C.'s south coast.

Mount John Clarke has been accepted by the province as the name for a 2,306-metre-high peak located southwest of Sims Creek and northeast of Princess Louisa Inlet that had informally been known as Sun Peak.

http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Mountain+name+honours+legendary+explorer+Coast+Range/2973810/story.html

So it's finally official.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 1, 2010 - 08:15pm PT
Discovered this in the 'archives':

'67 Summit
'67 Summit Waddington issue
'67 Summit Waddington issue
Credit: Reilly

Complete with driving directions from Seattle for the cartographically challenged!
The article is by Keith Gunnar who was an excellent photographer as you shall see. Summit's photo repro was not great; I would like to see the originals.

View of Mt Munday from Mt Jeffrey
Munday from Jeffrey
Munday from Jeffrey
Credit: Reilly

Pg2
Pg2
Credit: Reilly

Maps
Maps
Credit: Reilly

Pg4
Pg4
Credit: Reilly

Pg5
Pg5
Credit: Reilly

Pg6
Pg6
Credit: Reilly
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 1, 2010 - 08:43pm PT
Bonus post of some of that inimitable Summit 'humour' (don't choke Tami!)
hahaha!
hahaha!
Credit: Reilly
Tami

Social climber
Canada
May 1, 2010 - 09:43pm PT
Gack me !!!...... that's bad! !!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 1, 2010 - 10:32pm PT
Thought that would make yur night!
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
May 1, 2010 - 11:27pm PT
luv to see more from that '67 Summit issue !
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 3, 2010 - 01:15am PT
OK, Bmacdaddy, your wish is my scan. There was a page of four color photos but they were reproed very poorly in the mag so I didn't bother.
This issue also had a Bjornstad article on mud nailin' in the Fisher Towers and an 'informative' article "Which Stove Will You Carry", and an article on a FA at Tahquita (Jonah). I suppose I'll have to scan a couple of those.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
May 4, 2010 - 01:34am PT
We just had a cold spring storm hit ; bet our Bruce is out shredding.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Dec 13, 2012 - 08:38pm PT
The North Vancouver Museum & Archives has now scanned and posted historical BC mountain photos. "Mountain Light is a selection of photographs, taken by notable BC mountaineers. The images are all from the British Columbia Mountaineering Club’s archival collection which was transferred to the North Vancouver Archives in 2012. This display provides a sampling of the depth of that collection." See http://www.nvma.ca/collections8.htm
gf

climber
Dec 13, 2012 - 08:50pm PT
cool slideshows mh -i will stop by to see the full collection
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Dec 13, 2012 - 09:32pm PT
Thanks for the heads up Anders !
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