Time for the FIRE FALL!

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Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Why'djya leave the ketchup on the table?
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 17, 2010 - 07:18am PT
From a Sacramento Bee article about Yosemite's new boss, comes this delightful image:



Photo credit ERIC PAUL ZAMORA / Fresno Bee, states it was taken on this past Sunday. Is this natural or a 'shopped' photo???

DMT
Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
Feb 17, 2010 - 07:23am PT
New volcano emerging along the ring of fire. It just happens to be near the top of Zodiac. New rating on Zodiac: 5.7 A2 VI LAVA
Maysho

climber
Soda Springs, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 07:26am PT
Can't say for sure on possible alteration, but the natural effect does happen like that. Chris Falkenstein has caught this, as did Rowell, i think Ed Hartouni got it on the same day last week as well:
http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1089120/Its_a_wonderful_day_in_the_valley

How's it going DMT? Corn snow up here now, but a little more fresh might be on the way!

Peter
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Why'djya leave the ketchup on the table?
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 17, 2010 - 07:30am PT
Going well Peter. Spent the weekend in LA with my kid at University. No climbing but the "LA Thing" was fun.

Ready to shred again, now.

I recalled the Rowell image. My buddy Stu had a proof image of it on his living room wall. What I did not recall is how Rowell got the photo. Good to see Ed's image there too, thanks.

Thanks!
DMT
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Feb 17, 2010 - 07:50am PT


I wuz hopin' it was Ed's photo. . . see below thread. . .

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1089120&tn=0
susan peplow

climber
www.joshuatreevacationhomes.com
Feb 17, 2010 - 08:10am PT
Beautiful photograph. I was hoping we were going to find ourselves with the old tradition of "let the fire roll" back for public viewing.

My mother as a child through young adulthood spent summers in Yosemite with my grandparents. She often regales me with tales of the fire fall in the evening summer programs.

http://firefall.info/

Next time I'm digging around the slides I'll pull and scan the slides of her old Yosemite photos and neighboring Bass Lake.

A little OT personal note...my parents have done and seen some cool stuff. To think, when I was a kid I'd get bored with the multi-week vacations. At the age of 9, I claimed I had hiked every waterfall in west of the Mississippi. I wish those endless, free, and interesting vacations were available today!

~Susan



Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 08:14am PT
the images are probably all Photoshopped at some level to enhance the qualities... I was probably very close to this same person on Sunday.

here is another version of my photo on that other thread


to my "naked eyes" the falls were not as red as is depicted in this image.

Rowell writes about his 1973 image in his 1986 book Mountain Light: In Search of the Dynamic Landscape on page 23:

"One evening when Chris Vandiver and I were driving around Yosemite after a climb, we spotted this phenomenon, and I rushed across the valley to photograph it, arriving as the light was fading. I had not heard of it or seen it before, and I had no reason to expect I would ever see such light again, but on the following evening there it was."

He describes his incredible, ranger escorted race to a spot across the valley near "the concessioner's woodlot." I don't recognize this particular place in the current valley, anyone remember where this was?

The photo Rowell took was on Kodachrome 25, using a 300 mm lens in the fading night light... probably not "Photoshopped"... but that film had very good red saturation.

I'll try to get another shot this year from a slight different vantage point, with a longer lens, on digital and film (though the days of Kodachrome have passed, I think I can get some Velvia 50 still)...

In the image above I was shooting with an ISO of 320 because of the fading light, the exposure was f8 and 1/160 with my 180 mm lens, which on the DSLR I was using is more like a 270 mm lens, so close to Rowell. I suspect that he was a bit farther east than I was, looking at the pictures and especially the perspective of the top of the Horse Tail Falls area.

I can only assume that Rowell used the Nikkor 300 mm f2.8 EDIF lens... which was available then. Assuming he was 3 aperture stops down, that takes the ISO 320 to an equivalent 40, the next factor of two would be in speed so down to 1/60.... guessing he was at f2.8 and 1/60s exposure on his ISO 25 Kodachrome.

Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 09:23am PT
The original slide of Horsetail Fall that appears in Mountain Light is just stunning. Unfortunately, after the publisher scanned the film for that book they apparently didn't do a very good job of cleaning it. They used oil to wet mount the film on the scanner. When Galen started the switch to digital fine art printing in the late '90s, the film was re-scanned and many of the those prime select images had developed tiny blue dots in the emulsion. (Other images from the same shoots did not have the dots.) Hours were spent cloning them out. These days people use alcohol based Kami fluid to mount the film - it completely evaporates.

The color and tone of the original slide probably looks closer to what you see in the book (Mountain Light) than the scanned/retouched image on the Mountain Light website, which is how Galen interpreted it:
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 09:34am PT
I was hoping that Jerry would chime in!

Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Why'djya leave the ketchup on the table?
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 17, 2010 - 09:35am PT
Me too. Thanks guys.

DMT
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 09:41am PT
:-)

Wasn't the old wood lot over by Manure Pile?
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 09:55am PT
that's what I thought too... but the lens is pretty big for being that close, I'll play around with Google Earth tonight and see what's what...
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 10:49am PT
I am looking at the picture in Galen's "The Yosemite". Based on this copy, it looks like he may have used a warming filter (81A?). The sky is gray but has a hint of orange. If Jerry has seen the actual slide maybe he can elaborate.

Also you younger folk, it was possible to manipulate pictures before Photoshop.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Feb 17, 2010 - 11:00am PT
kewl
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 11:34am PT
Srb,
Its been ten years now since I've seen the original, and I don't have a copy of The Yosemite, but my recollection is as you say. I don't know about the 81A but sorta doubt he used one with that lens and those circumstances.

John Shaw makes an interesting point that The Chrome Era was interesting and unique in the history of photography in that it was the only time that the image made in camera was so highly regarded. Unlike a film negative or raw digital file which must be developed, it was viewed as the authentic and infallible finished image.

Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 11:34am PT
ask Jerry, don't think he would have had enough "room" in his exposure to use a filter... and the 300 mm aperture is pretty huge (maybe it used those funky little filters on the back end of the lens).

However, when he made the print he might have interpreted it redder, certainly it was "photoshopped" after it was digitized... but that's part of "the performance"
Hankster

Trad climber
Left Hand, CO
Feb 17, 2010 - 12:09pm PT
It had to happen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RPoMAhfxDg

Caylor
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 12:14pm PT
I don't think the filter size would be an issue. I would think the filter size on an older lens would be maybe 67mm or 72mm. Maybe someone has one and can check. Rowell was a big fan of filters:)
edit: the modern 300 f2,8 are 52mm filter size.

Also Kodachrome could easily handle the 1/3 stop loss of a light warming filter. If he shot at the film speed (25) the 1/3 stop loss would probably look better with Kodachrome.

I guess it is all mental masterbation at this point :)

Ed - It would be interesting to see it in Velvia. The increase contrast should highlight the falls and if there is even a hint of red, Velvia will really pop it. Look forward to seeing it!!!
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 12:25pm PT
Jerry - I always thought it would be cool for someone who shoots, say 8x10, to do an exhibit of transparencies using light boxes. Chromes are so beautiful. There are not a lot people who can bring out that magical "glow" in a print.
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss on the end of a Wet Fist
Feb 17, 2010 - 12:38pm PT
These were all shot on Velvia over the course of the last 10 years or so.
I used my 500mm f4 lens with and without teleconverters up to 1000mm.
I also used a polarizer which is a 39mm "drop-in" type.




aguacaliente

climber
Feb 17, 2010 - 12:44pm PT
A Nikon 300/2.8 uses a 122mm filter in front or a 39mm filter in rear, not that I have ever had one. Simple aperture math (300/2.8 = 107mm entrance aperture) tells you the filter has to be enormous. There was also a 300/4.5 lens that was more portable. Although the chrome era placed value on the image as made in camera, a photo reproduced for a print or a book could easily be color tweaked a little - achieving precise color balance for reproduction is not simple.

Anyway, these photos are really cool and I like how they emphasize the virtue of being in the right place at the right time, beyond any reproduction enhancements.
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 01:05pm PT
The front element is VERY large, but the filter size on the modern lens is 52mm (per Nikon). I assumed larger on an older lens because everything seems larger on the older lenses. Of course, they probably didn't have the slip in filter then and you would attach to the rear element.

You are right about the color balance on a reproduction. That's why I made clear my source. Even the color of the room (or ligthsource) you are in will change it.
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 01:51pm PT
Great shots Walter!

Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 01:58pm PT
Yeah Walleye - I especially like the tight crop of the middle shot. Almost like lava. Keep em comin'!
Captain...or Skully

Social climber
walkin' the road to nowhere
Feb 17, 2010 - 01:58pm PT
WALLEYE!!!!

WooHoo!!!! Nice.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 06:58pm PT
wonderful shots Walleye
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 07:53pm PT
As I'm going down the thread, I'm thinking, Where's Walleye when you need him and right at the bottom, Wham!. Great shots everyone and thanks for the details Jerry D.
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Feb 17, 2010 - 08:00pm PT
Awesome thread!
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 08:04pm PT
Back to the actual, historical, Fire Falls---- it was actually cool visually and romantic too. I saw them many times. But the biggest problem I always supposed was what happened when the falls were concluded. All at once, all over the upper end of the Valley, thousands of cars started up and tried to head back to the campsites where they belonged. The traffic jam was stupendous and would last for well more than an hour and a half-- all these vehicles idling and nudging forwards. You could even hear the noise as they all began their trek in unison.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Feb 17, 2010 - 09:32pm PT
I waited for about 45 minutes on Monday at dusk but didn't even get a twinge of orange.

It was like the Facelift for photogs. There must have been a hundred of them in the Manure Pile area.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 11:47pm PT
The fantastic image that Galen Rowell made of the light on Horse Tail Falls occurs in February. The reason is because the Sun sets on the western horizon which is visible from the top of Horse Tail Fall at a bearing from 248.17º to 256.05º. The horizon is roughly 90 miles away. (A side note: the distance to the horizon in miles is the square root of the altitude in feet, the proof is left as an exercise for the reader).

So one calculates the days that the sun sets in between those two headings, and at a time when there is water in the falls, which is winter time... this year the first sunset would have been on 2/1/10 at 1717 PST, and the last sunset will be 2/19/10 at 1737 PST, which is Friday.

Ideal conditions would be a clear sky all the way to the coast which gives a maximum red sunset. That was not quite the case when I took my image on 2/14/10, I marked the position of the sunset that day also.

After Friday, the Nose will obscure the Sun from Horse Tail Falls and we'll have to wait until next year...



Today would have been a good day to shoot the falls, though it was hazy around sunset. Tomorrow night will be partly cloudy, and Friday some chance of snow...

neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 18, 2010 - 03:02am PT
hey there say, dmt, ed, and every single other photographer, of you all....

i just love how light plays and moves in photos... i was never able to pursue, as a kid... (got married, etc, no funds, etc, just kids) :)

BUT----every time i SEE this stuff, i just "fall in love again" with what the good lord can do in our world, with light, color, rocks, and darkness, and every single thing...

thank you all for helping to explain all this stuff, as to lens, photo-shooting and all...

i hope someday that i can make up for lost time just a tad--and get some wonderful shots, too, in some ways...

ed, and all:
thanks for trying to explain this as to detail...i will never really understand, unless i have an "on hand nearby coach"---but i still just love to hear it all...


thanks for all the great shares, here... sure do LOVE that waterfall, too... even the name! ...
god bless...

you all made my night very happy today (or better said-early morning, as it is now)...
:)
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss on the end of a Wet Fist
Feb 18, 2010 - 08:00am PT
Jerry wrote

"John Shaw makes an interesting point that The Chrome Era was interesting and unique in the history of photography in that it was the only time that the image made in camera was so highly regarded. Unlike a film negative or raw digital file which must be developed, it was viewed as the authentic and infallible finished image."

This is a very good, and interesting point, and I tend to agree with it in a kind of non rigid way. My final prints for exhibition always must match the original transparency as closely as possible, and that would be MY interpretation. I have to cringe sometimes when photographers say that they interpreted the image to how they felt at the time they made the photograph. Is it the same thing? I'm not really sure, but it always brings up heated discussions in photo circles.

Thanks all for the feedback on my images. I was out with a client on Monday the 15th and I thought it was going to really light up, but it didn't do much at all. This year really has the potential though because of all the warm temps we've had. The water volume is very good right now.
CF

climber
Feb 18, 2010 - 08:28am PT
having photographed this for almost 20 years i can say that it does get that red, looks like molten metal being poured.

i used to be the only photog at the turnout before sentinel but now it is so crowded you can not find a place to park

Horsetail Falls, El Capitan, Yosemite 3/5/08 5:24 pm
Credit: CF
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 18, 2010 - 08:57am PT
hey there walleye, say, i am just now getting offline, but i HAD to come to see all this...

i will forever be in awe of how photos can be taken...

very nice, you all.. very very nice...

well, god bless... all for now, today...
:)
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 18, 2010 - 09:12am PT
My final prints for exhibition always must match the original transparency as closely as possible, and that would be MY interpretation. I have to cringe sometimes when photographers say that they interpreted the image to how they felt at the time they made the photograph

That's an advantage of transparencies (for some). You have a positive image for reference. With color negatives you are working more from memory. With black and white you are further removed from "reality".

With the very little color printing I have done, I always liked printing from transparencies because I liked that reference point. One of my friends (who only shoots color) never refers back to the chromes. He wants the print to be the interpretation at that moment.

We should have a Supertopo exhibition. Anyone got any gallery space? :)
CF

climber
Feb 18, 2010 - 09:45am PT
what year was galen's photo taken?

i have noticed that it is very hard to get photos of the firefall being as red as it used to be due to the build up of smog in the central valley.

the sun now has to set through this and it seems to get very muted and cut off and not get a chance to be brilliant red.

the only time you might be able to get it really crisp red is after a storm.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Feb 18, 2010 - 09:59am PT
CF,

or during or after a forest fire, me thinks, given some red sky views I've seen post fire.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 10:10am PT
fires happens during the summer,
water happens during the winter...


the best red sunsets will be on those very clear days from Yosemite all the way out into the Pacific ocean...
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 10:12am PT
Ya munge, but you don't get many fires in february. CF- Galen's shot was in '73, six months before I was born. haha.
JuanDeFuca

Big Wall climber
Peenemunde
Feb 18, 2010 - 10:13am PT
I saw the real fire fall. It would not be to hard to recreate it.

It sure would piss off the NPS.

Juan
BooDawg

Social climber
Paradise Island
Feb 18, 2010 - 10:53am PT
GREAT PIX!!

I have two very similar climbing stories related to the ACTUAL firefall:

On Memorial Day, 1966, when Tom Higgins and I were making what I think was the 14th ascent of HD's N.W. face, as we climbed the pitches below Sandy Ledges, a cloud formed over the dome, and we spent the late afternoon in a misty fog. At one point a golden eagle glided out of the fog to within 15' of us. We did the pitch behind Psych Flake (now gone) in complete darkness and fog. Within one minute of our arrival at the Sandy Ledges, the fog suddenly dissipated, and the whole of Yosemite Valley was revealed in the glowing light of the nearly full moon. And within a minute of that revelation, the firefall was released and streamed down the face of Glacier Point, imprinting itself on our memories.

Later that summer, I think, when Jim Bridwell and I made the first one-day ascent of Quarter Domes, I’d led the last pitch in the deepening dusk. After I tied off the rope for Jim to come up on Jümars, I sat down and let go of the day’s tension around getting to the summit before dark, and as I did so, I looked down Tenaya Canyon to see the firefall dropped from Glacier Point.

In both cases, each day’s focus on climbing as quickly as possible, combined with the rhythmic exertion-relaxation of the climbing-belaying cycle, followed by the nearly complete relaxation after each full day of climbing created the internal conditions for what I can only describe as “visionary” memories that have remained incredibly vivid to this day. These impressions and related phenomena are eloquently expressed by Doug Robinson in his article, “The Climber As A Visionary.”
t*r

Trad climber
☆•*¨*•.¸¸❤❤¸.•*¨*•☆
Feb 18, 2010 - 11:51am PT
thank you for this thread buddy. i am about to go to my second exam out of three today. i think this will get me thru :)
Ihateplastic

Trad climber
It ain't El Cap, Oregon
Feb 18, 2010 - 12:04pm PT
srbphoto...

We should have a Supertopo exhibition. Anyone got any gallery space? :)

Great Idea!!! Someone should line up a traveling exhibit and get 25-100 galleries across the land to show these.
Step one: Pick 25 - 50 images from our great (and almost great) ST photographers. (Ouch! how do we do that!)
Step two: Identify potential galleries/schools/coffee shops. Maybe this should travel from climbing store to climbing store... now that is a good idea! The audience is coming to the store for "outdoor" stuff so of course they would want to see "outdoor" pics. Problem: not much available space and are they really going to buy prints? (see step three.) Maybe REI should sponsor and the exhibit could travel REI stores? Not my favorite choice but they have pockets that indie stores don't.
Step three: Figure out how this thing pays for itself. Print sales?
Step four: Execute.

Oh no... another idea to add to my chockablock knapsack of plans. Feel free to contact me if anyone wants to take this a step further..
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 01:56pm PT
We could just keep contributing to the YCA art auction...
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Feb 18, 2010 - 02:15pm PT
Little reflection on the original Glacier Point Firefall.

Summer of 62 or 63 and JFK is on a visit to the Valley. After landing in the Meadow on the Presidential Helicopter, his motorcade proceeds to the Ahwahnee in all its glamour and pomp. Sitting on top the stone pillar at the entrance, not 15 ft away from his limo we get a very close and later to discover rare view of the man. Interesting that the Secret Service let us hang there? Or perhaps they were as surprised as we?

That evening was the Mother of all FireFalls.
John Moosie

climber
Beautiful California
Feb 18, 2010 - 05:29pm PT
I hope someone was out taking photos tonight. It looks like the sunset was cooperating.


El Cap sunset
El Cap sunset
Credit: John Moosie
Ropeboy

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 08:37pm PT
Dingus, Eric Paul Zamora shoots for the Fresno Bee and I have enjoyed his images for years. IMHO he has the smarts to know when the conditions are right for the shot and did not doctor it. He is a photo journalist and they have strong composition skills, their shots tell nearly the whole news story before you even start reading the words. And from years of reading the Fresno Bee I have not seen images that were obviously photo shopped, makes me think they must have some integrity policy about that. I would not expect him to whip out the reds saturation gizmo to show a color that was not there. Just my opinion.
BooDawg

Social climber
Paradise Island
Feb 19, 2010 - 12:55am PT
Following up on my previous posting:

In the last paragraph of his "Climber As A Visionary" article, Robinson shares his own wide-open doors of perception:

“…the climber wonders how he came into that privileged visionary position vis-à-vis the universe. He finds the answer in the activity of his climbing and the chemistry of his mind, and he begins to see that he is practicing a special application of some very ancient mind-opening techniques… Oddly, it is not consciously worked for, but comes as the almost accidental product of effort in another direction and on a different plane. It is at its own whim momentary or lingering suspended in the air, suspending time in its turn, forever momentarily eternal, as, stepping out of the last rappel you turn and behold the rich green wonder of the forest.”
Phil Bard

Trad climber
Lake Oswego, OR
Feb 19, 2010 - 12:18pm PT
I'll share a story about Horsetail that isn't so much about a picture, other than the one I carry around in my memory:

In June of 1982 my buddy Dave Lomba and I were climbing Zodiac, and Horsetail was still dripping a bit. During our first couple of days the wind would occasionally blow it over towards us and we would get a little wet, nothing serious though. On our second bivvy, we had just finished eating when we realized that it was going to be a full moon. Gradually the horizon on the south rim lightened as the moon rose, and it began to illuminate the wall above us. If you've ever been on that part of El Cap during a full moon you will know what that is like, the rock is absolutely incandescent. Gradually the light moved down towards us, and we could see more and more of the falls above and to the side, just tiny glimmers at first, but increasingly brilliant. Finally we were surrounded by blinding light and we were both just laughing our asses off. Horsetail looked like a hole had opened up in the blackness of the sky, with a million stars pouring out of it down past us towards the talus slopes below. It was the most beautiful moment I experienced in all my time climbing in Yosemite, and we both agreed it would have been great to have all of our friends there at that very moment. Dave's gone now, but whenever I think of him I also think of that night, and how lucky we were to be up there at just the right time.

Seems to be the thing with Horsetail, timing it just right.

Phil
John Moosie

climber
Beautiful California
Feb 19, 2010 - 12:21pm PT
Wow Phil, that is awesome!!!
JuanDeFuca

Big Wall climber
Peenemunde
Feb 19, 2010 - 12:36pm PT
Someone with knowlege of high Torque DC Motors a Big Dupster of Burning Chemical Logs and RF Transmission Skills and a DTMF Decoder.

Let the Fire Fall.

Juan
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 20, 2010 - 08:45am PT
Wow Phil, that must have been incredible.

I had a magic moment of light below horsetail fall and made a beautiful photo of a young lady (now she's my wife) taking it all in. I shared it here a few years ago, but after some as#@&%e re-posted it on a porn site I don't think I'll put it up again.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Mar 25, 2010 - 03:23pm PT
Just a little LOL share...It's not that impressive, but here goes.

I posted above that I came out from Manure Pile to the site of a zillion photography enthusiasts, and wondered, "What the?"

Once informed, I sat on the hood of my truck waiting for the firefall, snapping a few pics on the iPhone, but nada firefall action. When the experts started packing it in, we left disappointed too.

So, I was downloading photos from the camera the other day, and noticed that my phone "saw" firefall even when I didn't. Is this common, or when it's good is it really obvious as you stand there too?

Credit: Melissa

Credit: Melissa
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 6, 2011 - 12:26am PT
I have been having trouble with my spread sheet... so I've had to kludge together a report on this...

The sunsets starting on January 31st, 2011 which is at 5:19pm the sun sets at an azimuth of 248.41º which should be on the horizon from Horse Tail falls...

this will go until February 18th, 2011 with sunset at 5:39pm and a solar azimuth of 255.89º

Have fun, get some good shots and report back here!

[I used this calculator: http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/highlights/sunrise/azel.html with the coordinates for Yosemite Valley set at:

Lat: 37 deg, 44 min, 48 sec
Long: 119 deg, 34 min, 44 sec (note that this calculator defaults as "+" = west)
and the UTC offset = 8 (note sign is "+" here too)

Sunset is when the solar elevation = 0º

If you don't want to search around for sunset times, generate the table for the year here:
http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneYear.php

put in for Long: 199 deg 35 min (rounding)
and Lat: 37 deg 45 min
and a time zone of 8

the "west" buttons should be clicked for you already...]

Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 08:23pm PT
pretty poor weather this year...

following my hypothesis... the Sun has been setting north of azimuth 248.66º since the first of Feb. and will pass the Nose on 2/19 (azimuth of 256.26º, the azimuths are with respect to Horsetail Falls).

looks like rain/snow starting on Monday or Tuesday... so hopefully a red red sunset sometime this weekend... and water in the falls...

briham89

Big Wall climber
san jose, ca
Feb 15, 2013 - 08:27pm PT
I'm wondering if there will be enough water
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Feb 15, 2013 - 08:34pm PT
Chicken Skinner got some good photos and posted them to his facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=pcb.475487769171934&type=1
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
bouldering
Feb 15, 2013 - 09:17pm PT
I came out from Manure Pile to the site of a zillion photography enthusiasts ...
I would think there are higher (better?) vantage points up the valley to get the shot, but now that I look, Walleye's stuff puts even Rowell's attempts to shame.
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