Mt. Shasta

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moosedrool

climber
Andrzej Citkowicz far away from Poland
Topic Author's Original Post - May 19, 2018 - 10:56am PT
I have to confess, Iíve never used crampons or an ice ax. Iíve never been above 11k feet. Iíve never camped on the snow.

Now, I need to muster those skills fast, before I go to Karakorum.

So, I figured, climbing Mt. Shasta would give me an opportunity to practice those things.

If you have any advice how I can avoid death or worse, please, share it with me.

Moose

Bad Climber

Trad climber
The Lawless Border Regions
May 19, 2018 - 11:01am PT
Wow. Gunning for K2 with your "lack of skill set"? Death is a certainty. But Shasta is a good place to get down some basics. The south side routes--Avalanche Gulch, Casaval Ridge, et al. have no glaciers, so it's a good place to practice cramponing, post-holing, self-arresting. Have fun!

Of course, no one escapes death. Just a matter of when.

BAd
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 19, 2018 - 12:05pm PT
Start on Lassen. jess sayiní...

Seriously, there are good slopes to practice SA close to the parking lot.
wkdkoolbtxh

climber
May 19, 2018 - 01:44pm PT
holy f*#k. how can you spend 25 hours a day on a climbing forum and not know how to use piolet and crampons??? this is a joke right?? as far as prep, stay the f*#k off shasta. what you really need to do is post more frequently....here and on mp and the million other sites you use. that will mos def make into a real alpinist.
moosedrool

climber
Andrzej Citkowicz far away from Poland
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2018 - 01:58pm PT
wkdkoolbtxh, Iím trying to post as much as I can, but, as you notice, the day is only 25h long.

Reilly, my plan, for now, is to climb(?) Mt. Shasta in two days.

Is there a good spot mid trail to spend a night?

Moose
Mark Force

Trad climber
Ashland, Oregon
May 19, 2018 - 02:03pm PT
When are you going to Shasta, Moose?

Take a course from the guides on Shasta.

Shasta Mountain Guides
http://shastaguides.com

SWS Mountain Guides
http://www.swsmtns.com

After that I'll play with you on the north side. Maybe we can climb the Hotlam. Ashland isn't far away.
moosedrool

climber
Andrzej Citkowicz far away from Poland
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2018 - 02:09pm PT
Mark, Iím planing to go sometime between Jun 11th and 16th.

Would be awesome if you could join me, although, I will be veeeerrrry slow.

Moose
Malemute

Ice climber
great white north
May 19, 2018 - 02:14pm PT
You better get as high as you can, as often as you can ...
moosedrool

climber
Andrzej Citkowicz far away from Poland
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2018 - 02:21pm PT
Btw, I donít care if I get to the summit.

I just want to get familiar with the new equipment, and get some idea what a mountaineering is.

Moose

Edit, Malemute, thatís gold! LOL

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 19, 2018 - 02:28pm PT
Moosie, plenty of bivy spots. Be sure to stock up in Weed.

Here ya go, just what ya need!
Credit: Reilly
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
May 19, 2018 - 04:19pm PT
hey there say, ohmy... we are going to have a snow-moose now...
to go with snowy-owls... :)


learn well, take your time and be safe'er :)
Fritz

Social climber
Choss Creek, ID
May 19, 2018 - 04:57pm PT
Moose! I agree with Mark Force. Contact one of the Shasta guiding services & get a two day, personalized for you snow climbing class. You will learn soooo-much more than you would stumbling around on your own.

In the long-ago of 1971, I led a group of rock-climbing friends into the east side of Wyoming's Ganett Peak & with my rote-memorization of Mountaineering Freedom of the Hills, we survived the glacier & likely did a new route.

However, I learned there was sooooo-much I didn't know about snow & ice climbing & glacier survival during that trip. That fall I took a Rainier Mountain Guides snow & ice climbing & glacier travel course that ended with a Rainier climb.

Was it a perfect course? No, but I learned a lot of stuff, especially in their "hands-on" ice-axe arrest session, where we were launched down a steep hard snow slope in most every possible position & expected to stop ourselves with our ice-axe.

That & technique on steep snow & ice is what you need to learn------& quickly.

Remember to have fun!
mark miller

Social climber
Reno
May 19, 2018 - 05:04pm PT
Is this a troll???
Take the Guide courses and pay attention, you'll be able to pick up what many of us survived through by dumb luck. You've never snow camped? You need to learn to love the stuff and learn everything about snow (there's a lot to learn, different kinds of snow, how to stay dry (don't rely on technology in gear, it will fail), how to camp in it and sleep in it to reduce the effects of condensation, etc. Oh yeah, Learn the whole avalanche thing, LEARN and practice not just a weekend course.
Do the tourist routes on Shasta then hook up with someone for the Hotlum, Bolum side, practice falling in a crevasse and rescuing one another. Know and practice self arrest, over and over again, you'll be amazed how fast you pick up speed and will need to arrest yourself. Then go to Rainer and prepare to suffer. Next attempt some routes in Alaska with technical climbing and altitude. Have you ever done any mixed climbing??? Go to S. America and practice on some of those ridiculously tall volcanoes, breathing , puking and eating foreign cuisine. You should practice loving the cold and functioning (climbing and surviving) in it at a high level, you're really thinking about K2.
I've always loved the snow. Grew up winter camping and when I got a drivers license climbing anything frozen in CA. Enjoyed the hell out of the moderate weather Sierras and lower Cascades, but head up to Rainier and get a taste of something a little more mountain... She almost killed me twice, I'm cured. Good Luck!
PS do you want to buy some Ice Gear and size 13 Boots?
moosedrool

climber
Andrzej Citkowicz far away from Poland
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2018 - 05:48pm PT
Iím not attempting to climb K2, or anything above 6k. Just trekking and rock climbing. Nothing more serious than Mt. Shasta. At higher elevation, of course. Iím too old to start some serious mountaineering.

So, donít put too much into it.

I have a lot of practice dealing with all kind of snow as a skier (over 50 years). I know how to self arrest using my ski polls. It wonít take much to learn how to use an ice ax for that purpose, I think. Hiking steep snow in skiing boots wonít be that different from using crampons. I wonít be climbing technical ice.

Hiring a guide would be an overkill.

Just looking for some tips, thatís all.

Thank you for carrying, though.

Moose
PIZZAMAN

Trad climber
Van Nuys, Ca.
May 19, 2018 - 06:00pm PT
Axe= completely different than poles

Crampons=Way different than ski boots. (got anti-balling plates??)

Always roll to the head of the axe.

Feet up, knees down with crampons on.
F

climber
away from the ground
May 19, 2018 - 06:03pm PT
Sweet Jesus.
Stick to the keyboard.
PSP also PP

Trad climber
Berkeley
May 19, 2018 - 06:28pm PT
Bring a flying saucer for the descent!
Nawmean?

Social climber
Out there
May 19, 2018 - 06:45pm PT
Donít let F get you down, mousie. Post up that pic of your pubes again and heíll likely sponsor an avy course for you.


Credit: Nawmean?



Cheers

Dee Em Tea
atchafalaya

Boulder climber
May 19, 2018 - 07:02pm PT
You know how to walk right? And you have camped in a tent before? Then you will make easy work of Shasta.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 19, 2018 - 07:05pm PT
^^^^^ Dood, you didnít ask if he can walk AND chew gum.
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