STONEY POINT

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Messages 201 - 220 of total 2071 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
MisterE

Social climber
Across Town From Easy Street
Feb 9, 2010 - 06:40am PT
That is just such a cool piece of history! Excellent monkey-wrenching!
matty

Trad climber
los arbor
Feb 9, 2010 - 09:21am PT
BooDawg - Great posts, thanks sooo much. That traffic jam cracks me up. Got any good Kamps stories?

Matt
BooDawg

Social climber
Paradise Island
Feb 9, 2010 - 10:14am PT
Here are two pix of the FA of the "Boche Death Route." I'm not sure who actually took the pix; they are duplicate slides. Probably Hennek, Lauria, or McLean.

FA of the "Boche Death Route."
FA of the "Boche Death Route."
Credit: BooDawg
FA of the "Boche Death Route."
FA of the "Boche Death Route."
Credit: BooDawg
ColeGibson

Trad climber
Los Angeles, California
Feb 9, 2010 - 05:01pm PT
Hello,

My name, as if it wasn't obvious from my screen name, is Cole Gibson and I've been working on a documentary about the history of climbing at Stoney Point for the last year and half, tentatively titled "Stoney Point: Portrait of an American Crag." So far we've interviewed almost 20 people ranging from Glen Dawson, who first climbed at the Point in 1927, to young kids pushing the limits in the present time.

About a year before graduating from film school at USC, I found what would become my life's passion out at Stoney Point. Like so many others before me, I fell in love with climbing at Stoney and haven't looked back since. Early on I met long time climbers like Guy Keesee, Mike Flood and Jan McCollum who became mentors and are to this day very good friends. Over the years I've met some of my best friends out at the Point and the place has truly become something special to me.

The history of climbing at Stoney Point over the last hundred years is richer than cheesecake and, as a filmmaker, it was a no brainer that this needed to be my first real project outside of school. Today, the film is about 75% complete, from a shooting standpoint, and I've amassed an amazing collection of historical photos and video assets. The Sierra Club, Glen Dawson, Brooks Ayola and many others have been HUGELY instrumental in the gathering of this collection and the project wouldn't be where it is without their help. Thanks guys!!! Climbing magazine will be publishing an article I wrote on the subject this coming Fall and the movie will be finished concurrently.

As a long time lurker here on the Taco I've held off on writing a post like this but, for better or worse, the time has come. While I already have enough assets to make a very complete documentary I can always use more. So if anyone has photos or stories or anything that they'd like to donate to or share with the documentary please let me know, either here on Supertopo, or by shooting me an email at - cgibson22@gmail.com

While I don't have many more interviews to do, I do have a couple people I'd like to get a hold of. Chief of whom are Mark Powell and TM Herbert. If anyone has contact info for these guys could you please send it to me so that I can reach out to them about the project? The 60's era is a little thin right now and I think these two legends would flesh it out nicely, to say the least!

Anyway, if it calls for it, I'll be posting on here regularly but for now please enjoy the following pictures. I'd love to post more but in terms of the article and the movie I don't think it's a good idea.
Thanks,

Cole

Glen Dawson canyon jumping in the early 30's
Glen Dawson canyon jumping in the early 30's
Credit: Glen Dawson/Sierra Club
Glen and brother Muir Dawson on boulder 1
Glen and brother Muir Dawson on boulder 1
Credit: Glen Dawson/Sierra Club
Summit boulder
Summit boulder
Credit: Sierra Club
Royal Robbins leading at Stoney, pulled this one off the net so if any...
Royal Robbins leading at Stoney, pulled this one off the net so if anyone knows who took the pic or has a high quality version please let me know.
Bob Kamps at Stoney Point
Bob Kamps at Stoney Point
Credit: Bob Kamps Collection
The dreaded Power Glide crimp
The dreaded Power Glide crimp
Credit: ColeGibson
My GF Steph sending hard
My GF Steph sending hard
Credit: ColeGibson
matty

Trad climber
los arbor
Feb 9, 2010 - 05:11pm PT
Thx Cole! Great photos, looking forward to the whole shabang.

QH
rincon

Trad climber
SoCal
Feb 9, 2010 - 05:33pm PT
Cool photos Cole and everyone! This thread gets better and better!

Too bad it's raining and the rock is soaked, or we'd be there right now having fun.
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 9, 2010 - 08:42pm PT
B-dawg you are rad!
the traffic pic's made me think "what the hell are those students doing"? anyway, i like the pic of the S- turn with the train cruising on by!
ken Boche nice to meet ya!
when top-rope season is active we'll post some pic's of the gang climbing the "boche death route"..

tarbuster~thanks for check'n the Stoney thread. the fish is my favorite..

cole~your constant questioning stoney's history has inspired this thread...so get what you can out of it, because the world should always come climb at Stoney.
Stephanie you should get out more because i know your super strong!

Rincon i had to go to the gym today because of the rain..

sunset shot!
sunset shot!
Credit: pyro



BooDawg

Social climber
Paradise Island
Feb 11, 2010 - 09:26am PT
I'm pasting in these references to Stoney from what I wrote last nite elsewhere... http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1079288&tn=20

More important, as you recall, were are frequent and intense trips to Stoney and then moving beyond… Have you checked out the Stoney Point thread in the last day or so? A film maker, Cole Gibson is making a documentary on Stoney. He says the 60’s is a bit thin. Did he interview you? If not, I’m thinking he may be missing an important piece of Stoney’s influence, considering the intensity with which we climbed there and the places that we went later.

Someone else on the Stoney thread, I think, was asking me for Kamps stories. You, LongAgo, of course, are probably the best one for those…
hoipolloi

climber
A friends backyard with the neighbors wifi
Feb 11, 2010 - 12:50pm PT
climbing bump
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 11, 2010 - 05:00pm PT
I helped to kick this TV short out as an independent thread not long ago.
The link belongs here as well as it's all footage shot out at Stony Point:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qOlFRW0hZI


Previously posted here:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1073956/Largo_Lynn_Dave_Katz_TV_short_Early_80s
LongAgo

Trad climber
Feb 11, 2010 - 07:42pm PT
Tidbits

The smell of Stoney after a rain, climbing the big face on some pothole route in the rain with Bud (Ivan) Couch both wearing plastic bags with head holes because, well, we were trying to become mountaineers or Herman Buhl or something, meeting Bob Kamps who took me under his wing and tuned my lust for the game into safe and sane climbing practice, and bantered with me and challenged me and me him on flake after flake, boulder after boulder, then back to his house for a sumptuous meal from Bonnie, and on and on to Tahquitz, Yosemite, Tuolumne with Bob, now a brain full of walls, pinnacles, domes, routes and campfires and starry nights, Bob and our times still deep within me and why, in most measure, all of climbing now rests with me like a great lasting love.

Here's a small memory of Bob at Stoney, written a couple of years ago for a Stoney guidebook which may or may not ever come out. What better place for it than this thread, this bit of cyberspace where we connect full of exuberance and heart for the big lumps of sandstone called Stoney Point:

Tribute

I vaguely remember a charred, skeletal car body at Stoney Point the first time I visited there. The place looked crummy and felt dusty and hot. The air was brown with smog. There were no climbers visible as I looked around Rock 1 (now called “Boulder 1”), just a few walkers, pooping dogs on the loose and some kids yelling, running and jumping around small boulders. Some of the boulders and higher cliffs were painted with names and hearts and four letter words. I think it was summer 1962.

I had come there to meet Bob Kamps. I had phoned him on a ruse, asking about the best rope to buy. I didn’t care about ropes. I had heard he was good. I wanted to learn about climbing and maybe get to climb real walls with him. All I had climbed at that point was the outside of my house with friend and neighbor Bud (Ivan) Couch. We had salivated over the book Freedom of the Hills, bought a few steel carabiners, a hemp rope and soft iron pitons, but never been on rock. So I steered my phone talk with Bob toward meeting at Stoney. He agreed.

After walking around some, I found Bob topping out on Rock 2 (now “Turlock” or Boulder 2). He wore a T-shirt, shorts and a light hiking boots, probably Cortinas. His hair was short, army-like. He was a little sunburned, wiry, knobby, veined and strong, matter of fact, but flashing a wry smile as we talked about how I liebacked wood siding on my house. It was the smile that told me I had a chance with him. The first thing he showed me was to use my feet, to look for edges and undulations in the rock for friction. We did some no-handed routes on a smaller rock near Rock 1. Bob moved as if walking up a stairway. I got the picture about feet. Later, we did a top-roped climb on a pothole wall at the back (east side) of the area. As I struggled up nearing a crux, he called out, “man or mouse?” My blood zoomed, and up I went.

I remember now the little circuit of Stoney routes we often did as Bob and I became lifelong climbing partners. I remember the smell of the gritty sandstone after a rain. I can feel the soft, grassy paths of the Spring, remember our bantering and competition bouldering. Bob could mantle anything. I was good at small hold endurance traverses. Over those years, Stoney and Bob built in me: wiring in a trust of tiny flakes, how to edge, hop step, step through, reach, match, smear, mantle, yell, laugh, curse and think anything was possible – all the essentials for the walls I came to do.

I remember sitting in the dirt with Bob near Rock 1 decades after our first encounter. We were spent, our arms pumped and gone, sipping a beer. I then lived in the Bay Area and was visiting for Thanksgiving (we alternated Thanksgivings visits for 30 years). Bob was eyeing a young climber, probably thinking, “no, put your foot there, not there.” By then, Bob had bouldered at Stoney about twice a week for nearly 40 years. Every flake, ledge, crack, hole and ledge was in his brain. I asked him if he remembered the first time I contacted him and he said, still looking at the climber but smiling, “Yeah, about the rope.” We laughed.

In 2005, about 200 people came to Stoney to honor Bob after his death. How fitting to hold a memorial for him there, but Bob is not gone from Stoney. He is there anytime I visit, stand still and close my eyes. Next time I go, he’ll be topping out on Rock 2 again, in his cut-off shorts, grinning.

Tom Higgins
LongAgo



guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Feb 11, 2010 - 08:24pm PT
Tom-What a wonderful tribute to a beautiful man.

The two of you together were unbeatable.

I spent a lot of time at Stony when I was at UCLA between 1966-71, but always had to get a "visitors pass" since I was a Northern Cal boy from the Indian Rock Gang. Boche and the gang will never let you forget you are in S.Cal turf. Kamps was always fun and generous with his time and his beer.

Here is an interesting letter from Bitchen Bill Amborn, aka BBA, that portrays a day at Stony in 1962 and various other activities going on back then with some of the key players. It wasn't all climbing.
BBA to Guido circa 62
BBA to Guido circa 62
Credit: guido
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 11, 2010 - 09:03pm PT
he had hands like a gecko!

this picture exhibit  exactly how bob looked like when sitting in betw...
this picture exhibit exactly how bob looked like when sitting in between sessions at the "Pot holes traverse" at Stoney ( he sure was fun to hang with and for sure my ultimate hero).

Credit: internet

Tom wrote: "The first thing he showed me was to use my feet, to look for edges and undulations in the rock for friction. We did some no-handed routes on a smaller rock near Rock 1."

~those no hand rests got challenged by a couple of gym rats the other day and non of em' could crank them out because the lack of foot technique! we showed them how bob showed us and then they got it.
thanks for the story Tom.

Guido how interesting!
thank-you


BooDawg

Social climber
Paradise Island
Feb 12, 2010 - 01:54am PT
WOW!! Tom, thanks SO MUCH for your moving and eloquent posting about your meeting Kamps and the relationship that you and he had over SO many years. Although my dad first took me to Stoney and to the Sierra, Cascades, Tetons, and Canadian Rockies, he really couldn't mentor me the way Kamps mentored you. We were all awed by, probably somewhat envious of, the two of you over the years. Sometimes I feel like nearly all climbers develop extraordinary bonds with those whom they have really connected. But I know that you and he had a special bond and love that not every climber is blessed with such bonding. Fred Becky, for all his genius and drive, may have missed some REALLY important life lesson that I KNOW you and Bob shared. So do Guido, Hennek, and Lauria. I feel honored to have known and climbed with all of you.

Sheesh, Guido, you really do amaze me, more than ever, with your knowledge and experience around this craft we call climbing. Thanks for your insightful comments which seem to be sprouting up everywhere like wildflowers in the spring.
matty

Trad climber
los arbor
Feb 13, 2010 - 04:50pm PT
He slept at stoney! Great stuff. RIP BoB
LongAgo

Trad climber
Feb 15, 2010 - 03:34pm PT
A Tad Philosophical

Ken, yes, I now realize my relation with Bob was especially formative and deep, launching me not just in climbing but shaping how I approached a host of life's pursuits. As Guido says, "It wasn't all climbing." Indeed.

As I look back these past few years, everything and nothing spins around climbing. I know I am largely who I am because of climbing. We all are who we are in large part because of climbing, so how could it not be vital? And yet, suppose my "game" had been tennis or surfing or cycling or skiing and I had met the equivalent Bob Kamps there and formed a resulting lifelong friendship and felt fulfilled, then what do we say?

Maybe we come to this: the most vital thing from the standpoint of feeling satisfied and whole in life (not to imply I always have that feeling, but by and large I do) is not so much the rock and our game on it, nor our particular climbing accomplishments which mostly will be hazy or forgotten with time, but how we go about whatever we go about. With what passion we invest ourselves in any life game, how we honor and respect those we meet, how we internalize what we come to value in others we love and admire and, then, how true we are to all we have learned and hold dear. Again, not to say that’s the path I’ve seen all along or, once seen, to which I’ve held. Far from it. It’s only in the past few years I’ve even had such thoughts. And how strange a thought, I realize, that climbing may not be the point, especially to put forth on a climbing site. But there it is: rock as mere "geography," -- stunning, superb geography, but only that compared to our inner geography, the growing and carving of our lives, which gives all things the only meaning they have.

We salute Stoney as we have on this thread. We salute times there and friends there and on all the walls. But, finally, we also must hope to salute ... ourselves.

Tom Higgins
LongAgo
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Feb 15, 2010 - 04:32pm PT

"A strong camaraderie existed among the more habitual climbers, the regulars, and he found strength in this relationship. There was, again, a sense of separation and special-ness among them. They were separated from society by their unusual passion and their willingness to pay an extreme price. Most were woefully poor but had the hubris to take pride in their indigence -- one young man actually bragging about his ability to live on six hundred dollars a year. Many saw poverty as a rejection, an act of holy indifference. But others were simply students. They’d discovered a rather engaging, even consuming hobby and the powerful redolence of rebellion and danger. Their goal was a strange mixture of physical hardness, psychological control and emotional sensitivity in the celebration of natural beauty.

And Stony Point was their place of embarkation; it was safe and comfortable, yet it offered a sense of waiting adventure. Like so much in L.A. offering possibilities, it teased, cajoled and sometimes repelled one into pursuing further excitement."

MisterE

Social climber
Across Town From Easy Street
Feb 15, 2010 - 08:54pm PT
Bump for the new-found happiness that comes from living 8 minutes from such a historic place in technical climbing.

It's like the start, 21 years ago at the UW rock, all over.

The learning texture feels the same.

Thanks to all the historical perspectives - I have a new-found appreciation for what initially seemed like a loud, ugly and friable crag.

Beginnings come from the least expected places, teaching and the simple and not-so-simple lessons of Stoney have renewed that fire.

Erik Wolfe
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 17, 2010 - 09:25pm PT
BooDAWG!
Ken Boche I sent you an email!
Boche death route..from the left.
Boche death route..from the left.
Credit: pyro
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 17, 2010 - 09:50pm PT
just some great temps for this week!
Credit: pyro
steve working the kamp's mantle!
steve working the kamp's mantle!
Credit: pyro
 Steve working the kamp's mantle...
Steve working the kamp's mantle...
Credit: pyro
Wes on  the Kamp's mantle!
Wes on the Kamp's mantle!
Credit: pyro
stacking hands is the first variation.
stacking hands is the first variation.
Credit: pyro
enjoy the pic's!
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