Climate Change skeptics? [ot]

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TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 17, 2015 - 05:14pm PT
Happy paddy day.

http://www.thepiratescove.us/2015/03/17/if-all-you-see-1432/
d-know

Trad climber
electric lady land
Mar 17, 2015 - 05:28pm PT
Raymond don't tell me you're going gay now.

Tell us then sunmer, going gay means what?

I'd like to hear what you think that means.

Limp wristed, taking it in the butt, weak, or just not
worth what a "non-gay" is worth?

Speak up now, boy.

You now bear the torch.


k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 17, 2015 - 07:06pm PT
The Chief's last stand:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1910588&msg=1910588#msg1910588

He says more in this post than just about any other he made.



Odd, his profile does not show "deactivated":

http://www.supertopo.com/inc/view_profile.php?dcid=PDg9PTU7PSc,
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Mar 17, 2015 - 07:06pm PT
So much for "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".

LOL.

Take care Chief,Mend them skillfully!

How about some good old fashioned Alarmism......


Greed=way worse than alarmism
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Mar 18, 2015 - 08:54am PT
NOAA released their February global temperature anomaly today. You wouldn't believe it where I live, but this was the 2nd-warmest Feb globally in their record. It's surpassed only by Feb 1998, which was the highest spike in that "super El Nino" (1998) year. But unlike Feb 1998, Feb 2015 follows on a string of other warm months, making the past 12-month period the warmest in NOAA's record. Graphically, looks like so:



"The pause" might have outlived its usefulness as a talking point, watch for older memes to come back in style.
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 18, 2015 - 09:15am PT
That is real shet you are posting Chiloe! :-) Like that shet hasn't happened in the last 4 billion years!!!!!!

:-)
Cragar

climber
MSLA - MT
Mar 18, 2015 - 09:22am PT
Whats Up With This:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/03/16/the-melting-of-antarctica-was-already-really-bad-it-just-got-worse/

..not looking good?..
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Mar 18, 2015 - 09:25am PT
That is real shet you are posting Chiloe! :-) Like that shet hasn't happened in the last 4 billion years!!!!!!

A sock puppet, I knew it!

Seriously, Earth was much hotter than this back in the days it had magma seas. So what's the big deal?
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Mar 19, 2015 - 09:31am PT
To call, or not to call? Whether the 2015 maximum northern sea ice extent is already past us, that is. This is actually a question among folks who like to watch ice melt, and there's a rumor that the National Snow and Ice Data Center will make an official call soon. Of course nature has the last word.

But if the 2015 maximum has passed already, that would be notable in several ways.
 The peak (so far) occurred back in February, and would be the earliest peak in the satellite record (1979 to now).
 This peak would also be the lowest annual maximum so far observed.

Nobody knows what this means for the coming melt season, if that's already started. Winter ice extent is not a good predictor for what's left in late summer. And summer ice cover matters more for several of the big climate feedbacks (albedo or solar reflection, but also ice sheet/glacier melting in the circumpolar North).

The graph below compares 2015 with a few recent low (2007 and 2012) and high (2013) minimum years.



But anyway it bears watching, by the folks who care about this stuff.
rick sumner

Trad climber
reno, nevada/ wasilla alaska
Mar 19, 2015 - 09:46am PT
Right. Dr. Quacko, salivate over those melting ice cubes and suffer us the plight of those increased population, yet endangered P-Bears.
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 19, 2015 - 10:02am PT
"Underlying any story about polar bear populations is the reality that it can be extremely difficult working with polar bears. They can range across international boundaries, over hundreds of kilometres of forbidding ice and frigid open water. They can dig into dens or camouflage themselves on snowfields. And mark-recapture studies, in which bears are tranquilized, are problematic. Drugging bears is dangerous for both the animals and the scientists, and Inuit often object to such invasive interactions, since drugging and physically handling bears stresses the animals and is an affront to traditional ecological practices.

So scientists end up counting bears in many different ways, including incorporating observations by knowledgeable local residents. But population estimates are just that: estimates. Some subpopulations of bears haven’t been counted in decades, if ever. And some are counted more frequently but with slightly different survey areas or methodologies from year to year. The Polar Bear Specialist Group, an international consortium of experts, classifies 10 of the 19 subpopulations as being “data-deficient,” which isn’t exactly conducive to a coherent discussion about how polar bears are faring worldwide.

Despite all this hedging, the numbers still tell a powerful story. It’s just not always clear what that story is. In Davis Strait, between Greenland and Baffin Island, the polar bear population has grown from 900 animals in the late 1970s to around 2,100 today. In Foxe Basin — a portion of northern Hudson Bay — a population that was estimated to be 2,300 in the early 2000s now stands at 2,570. And in specific areas of western Hudson Bay, the most-studied, most-photographed group of bears on Earth seems to have been on a slow but steady increase since in the 1970s.

News like this leaves climate-change deniers crowing from the rooftops. But a closer look reveals that everything may not be quite so sunny. “Some populations appear to be doing OK now, but what’s frightening is what might happen in the very near future,” says wildlife biologist Lily Peacock, who has worked with polar bears for the Government of Nunavut and the U.S. Geological Survey. “All indications are that the future does not look bright.” While population trends might appear stable, she says, “we’re picking up declines in body condition that are really frightening.” Scientists have shown a direct correlation between warm years and skinny bears. Even more distressing, one study predicted that 40 to 73 percent of pregnant females could fail to deliver healthy cubs if ice breakup happens one month earlier than in the 1990s. Polar bears are long-lived animals that reproduce slowly; counting the number of animals that are alive today might not paint an accurate picture.

http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/dec12/polar_bears.asp
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Mar 19, 2015 - 10:25am PT
Right. Dr. Quacko, salivate over those melting ice cubes and suffer us the plight of those increased population, yet endangered P-Bears.

Me I don't got no polar bears data, and hadn't thought about them when writing that note. I'm more like, "Ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee."

But just to help those cartoons in your head keep on flashing, here's something chick_on_ice posted a few weeks ago, mentioning polar bears on her thread, Hello from the Arctic Sea:

Basically there's a ton of open sea out here even though in the photos it looks like it's all frozen solid. Sea ice isn't like lake water since it's salty (obvious I know, but some people forget that salty water takes longer and colder temperatures to freeze than freshwater). The polar bears are out in full force this year because they're not getting enough to eat. So they can't be out on the pack ice since....there's not much ice out there for them to hunt on. So they're starting to be closer to the landmass, where since the sea is not as deep here, the water freezes over. So in summary, if you look from the 'beach' outside my hut, you'll see ice for miles, but if you get more than a mile out from the land, you start coming upon huge stretches of unfrozen sea ice. Just observations.

And completing the circle, that "unfrozen sea ice" she mentions is contributing to the possibly record-low maximum extent that I mentioned.
rick sumner

Trad climber
reno, nevada/ wasilla alaska
Mar 19, 2015 - 11:28am PT
It aint literature Wade, it's art. Given your job title you should appreaciate that.

Now, the rest of yous, cry us some rivers over the P-Bears. We could use the precip out on the western fringe of the continent.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Mar 19, 2015 - 12:46pm PT
Now, the rest of yous, cry us some rivers over the P-Bears. We could use the precip out on the western fringe of the continent.

I live on the Right Coast where it's freezing cold today and we've still got a couple feet of snow, so even as a cartoon that won't work. Can you cry your own river? It does look dry out your way.


Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 19, 2015 - 12:59pm PT
I bet Sumner can see Russia from his house.
rick sumner

Trad climber
reno, nevada/ wasilla alaska
Mar 19, 2015 - 01:08pm PT
The valley up North where I reside is full of Russkis. So yes Bob, in a way you could say thats true.
Malemute

Ice climber
great white north
Mar 20, 2015 - 06:54am PT


But here’s the most upsetting news. It’s been exactly 30 years since the last time the world was briefly cooler than its 20th-century average. Every single month since February 1985 has been hotter than the long-term average—that’s 360 consecutive months.

More than just being a round number, the 30-year streak has deeper significance. In climatology, a continuous 30-year stretch of data is traditionally what’s used to define what’s “normal” for a given location. In a very real way, we can now say that for our given location—the planet Earth—global warming is now “normal.” Forget debating—our climate has officially changed.

This 30-year streak should change the way we think and talk about this issue. We’ve entered a new era in which global warming is a defining characteristic and a fundamental driver of what it means to be an inhabitant of planet Earth. We should treat it that way. For those who care about the climate, that may mean de-emphasizing statistics and science and beginning to talk more confidently about the moral implications of continuing on our current path.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2015/03/19/thirty_years_of_above_average_temperatures_mean_we_re_entering_a_new_era.html
Malemute

Ice climber
great white north
Mar 20, 2015 - 07:16am PT


http://www.wired.com/2015/03/arctic-ice-extent-hits-30-year-low/
monolith

climber
SF bay area
Mar 20, 2015 - 10:51am PT
Smithsonian agreed to not disclose Willie Soon's funding sources and allowed Southern Company to review 'deliverables' before publication.

http://blog.ucsusa.org/willie-soon-climate-research-disinformation-637
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Mar 20, 2015 - 11:51am PT
Yeah it will be interesting to see what their internal investigation concludes. Willie Soon takes the fall and rightly so because his name is on papers where journal policy explicitly calls for disclosure. But back at the Institution, someone else went along and cashed checks.
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