Climate Change skeptics? [ot]

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The Chief

climber
Laughing at all the Sheep from on top of the Hill
May 9, 2014 - 11:44am PT
Oh boy, Insurance Corporations are now the heart of valid information that the sheep will abide by.


Amazing how people such as yourself KMAN disdain the world's corporate powers on a regular basis.


BUT!

NOT when those corporate thieves play the tune you are dancing by.

"catastrophe modeling tools"

Gee golly. There goes our insurance premiums. All of em.






LOL does not eeeeeeeeeeeeeeven come close to your clans buffoonery.



The Chief

climber
Laughing at all the Sheep from on top of the Hill
May 9, 2014 - 11:52am PT
Our government spends over $20 billion/year on global warming. What's it gotten us?

Reports such as the NCA that tell us the end of the world known as "NORM" is on the way.



Unless we all listen to and abide by the government and all it's paid scientists, we are all doomed. NOAA and NASA. Both guvment agencies.


They are going to save the day. Then again, they can only do so with our money through more taxes, fees and regulations. Oh yeah, and their expert "consensus" direction will follow.


Gotta love it!



In the mean time, them "robust Kelvin Waves" are coming (ENSO). Oh, they have NOTHING to do with CAGW. Nothing. That phenomena has been in existence for a longass time. Longer than them "Industrialized" humans they will very soon be blamed on, of course.

Misconception #8: El Niño and La Niña are closely related to global warming.

El Niño and La Niña are a normal part of Earth's climate system and have likely been occurring for millions of years.
http://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/can-we-blame-el-ni%C3%B1o




ENSO conditions have occurred at two- to seven-year intervals for at least the past 300 years, but most of them have been weak. Evidence is also strong for El Niño events during the early Holocene epoch 10,000 years ago.

El Niño affected pre-Columbian Incas and may have led to the demise of the Moche and other pre-Columbian Peruvian cultures. A recent study suggests a strong El-Niño effect between 1789 and 1793 caused poor crop yields in Europe, which in turn helped touch off the French Revolution. The extreme weather produced by El Niño in 1876–77 gave rise to the most deadly famines of the 19th century. The 1876 famine alone in northern China killed up to 13 million people.

An early recorded mention of the term "El Niño" to refer to climate occurred in 1892, when Captain Camilo Carrillo told the geographical society congress in Lima that Peruvian sailors named the warm north-flowing current "El Niño" because it was most noticeable around Christmas. The phenomenon had long been of interest because of its effects on the guano industry and other enterprises that depend on biological productivity of the sea.

Charles Todd, in 1893, suggested droughts in India and Australia tended to occur at the same time; Norman Lockyer noted the same in 1904. An El Niño connection with flooding was reported in 1895 by Pezet and Eguiguren. In 1924, Gilbert Walker (for whom the Walker circulation is named) coined the term "Southern Oscillation".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Ni%C3%B1o



Amazing how the famines, droughts, floods ("extreme weather events") and wars that killed all them millions of people, all occurred BEFORE any modern day coal fired power plant or SUV, ever existed.




SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSH! Let's not talk about them facts now.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
May 12, 2014 - 10:53am PT
The deep oceans continue to gain heat. NOAA just updated the heat content time series through Jan-Mar 2014. Both 0-700m and 0-2000m indexes set new records, slightly above their old records which they set the previous quarter.



Spitzer

climber
May 12, 2014 - 01:58pm PT
The deep oceans continue to gain heat.
Chiloe, it looks like we're going to get an El Niño event of some magnitude. If it turns out to be a strong one is there reason to believe that this would result in releasing some of the stored ocean heat?
blahblah

Gym climber
Boulder
May 12, 2014 - 02:37pm PT
The deep oceans continue to gain heat. . . .

Sweet! I guess this means we can keep on burning whatever we want with little fear of any negative repercussions, as those deep oceans are pretty darn big and, well . . . deep!

Or just listen to potential Rupub presidential candidate Marco Rubio, who makes some very persuasive arguments human caused global warming. (Actually he doesn't--there may be some good arguments against the AGW theory, I don't know, but Rubio doesn't make any real arguments whatsoever, he just states a "belief" that has as much reason behind it as statement like "I like the Denver Broncos." Hard to tell if people like Rubio are complete idiots, or simply consider that their supporters are complete idiots. Either way, I imagine it's got to be somewhat distressing to the "scientists.")

//“I don’t agree with the notion that some are putting out there, including scientists, that somehow there are actions we can take today that would actually have an impact on what’s happening in our climate,” Rubio said in an interview that aired Sunday on ABC’s This Week. “Our climate is always changing.”

“I don’t know of any era in world history where the climate has been stable,” Rubio added.//

http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/marco-rubio-global-warming
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
May 12, 2014 - 02:39pm PT
They are going to save the day


Still looking for a quote to back that one up
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
May 12, 2014 - 03:05pm PT
Chiloe, it looks like we're going to get an El Niño event of some magnitude. If it turns out to be a strong one is there reason to believe that this would result in releasing some of the stored ocean heat?

Kind of. Deep ocean water remains still pretty cold relative to equatorial sea surface conditions, so I don't think it can release much heat to the atmosphere itself (but may pull down less heat from the atmosphere, so the atmosphere warms faster anyway -- that would mark the end of our "pause").

The El Nino watch involves mainly shallower Pacific waters (<=250m) that actually are somewhat warm. Here is an impressive NOAA animation of the warm-water anomaly moving west to east in the equatorial Pacific, largely subsurface.

Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
May 12, 2014 - 03:08pm PT
Here is an astro-bird's eye view showing sea surface temperature anomalies. In the months ahead, keep your eye on what happens in the eastern tropical Pacific. Against the E coast of equatorial South America you can see warmer waters that represent the surfacing nose of that red temperature-depth slug above.

If El Nino happens, that's where it will show.

HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
May 12, 2014 - 03:35pm PT
data?
charts??
colored drawings???
don't give me none of that modern pseudo-scientific sh**t
(HA, I'll bet you didn't think I know how to spell pseudo)
I wanna believe what I wanna believe so don't try to scare me with your unsupported science.

Besides, Einstein didn't have all the answers in 1905 so why do you believe in this nonsense?
I get all I need to know about Global Warming BS from Krauthammer on Faux News
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Maestro, Ecosystem Ministry, Fatcrackistan
May 12, 2014 - 03:51pm PT
There'll be no climate change in Hell!

DMT
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
May 12, 2014 - 04:00pm PT
THIS JUST IN!!

"Climate Change causes weather fluctuations! "
HeHe.
So how goes the war against Climate Destruction?

Weather and tempature are secondary really to the main problem, Pollution! Just since the birth of this thread in 2009, everyday we continue to pump billions of gallons of oil out our exhaust pipes, and flush every kind of chemical into the waterways. I can't help imagine how much "Cleaner" the Planet was in '09 compared to today..

Reasons me to believe the planet will be "Dirtyer" tomorrow than it is today..

Lets celebrate the "Today is the Cleanest the Earth will be for the rest of Her life!" day.

I hope you'all are appreciating today's breathable air, and drinkable water!!
We sure are down here in JTree. 80' w/light winds, and suckin from one of Cali's oldest aquifers.
Cheers!
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
May 12, 2014 - 04:03pm PT
^^^^ occasionally I agree with you! Have a great day out there.
dirtbag

climber
May 12, 2014 - 05:01pm PT
I can't even pretend to respect skeptics any more. They are either liars or ignorant fools. The fools should just stfu.

All of them can go fook themselves.
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
May 12, 2014 - 05:49pm PT
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27381010
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
May 12, 2014 - 06:54pm PT
The BBC story HT cites above, "Nothing can stop retreat" of West Antarctic glaciers references a new Geophysical Research Letters paper by Eric Rignot et al.
We measure the grounding line retreat of glaciers draining the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica using Earth Remote Sensing (ERS-1/2) satellite radar interferometry from 1992 to 2011. Pine Island Glacier retreated 31 km at its center, with most retreat in 2005–2009 when the glacier un-grounded from its ice plain. Thwaites Glacier retreated 14 km along its fast-flow core and 1 to 9 km along the sides. Haynes Glacier retreated 10 km along its flanks. Smith/Kohler glaciers retreated the most, 35 km along its ice plain, and its ice shelf pinning points are vanishing. These rapid retreats proceed along regions of retrograde bed elevation mapped at a high spatial resolution using a mass conservation technique (MC) that removes residual ambiguities from prior mappings. Upstream of the 2011 grounding line positions, we find no major bed obstacle that would prevent the glaciers from further retreat and draw down the entire basin.

I haven't read the new paper yet, but will do. Interestingly Thwaites Glacier, which figures prominently in this new analysis, was one of the sites Richard Alley singled out last year at the AGU meetings -- as being a place that could bring "surprise" (abrupt change or threshold behavior) to the stately pace of climate change. From a post I wrote then,

Late in the day I caught part of a session on "Understanding and monitoring abrupt climate change and its impacts." Jim White, lead author of the new NAS report, gave a good intro explaining the concepts of thresholds and abrupt change. Richard Alley followed with a characteristically lively, energized and analogy-filled account of why the ice sheets will decide how fast sea level rises, and we really don't know what they will do. He noted Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica as one with particular potential to surprise us, controlling up to 3 meters of sea level.
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
May 12, 2014 - 07:03pm PT
John Oliver puts it all in statistical perspective
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjuGCJJUGsg
The usual NSFW disclaimer for language that would be censored on SuperTopo
The Chief

climber
Laughing at all the Sheep from atop the Hill
May 12, 2014 - 07:22pm PT
Well, you have 4-5 HUNDRED years to prepare for the rising sea levels.


Hopefully, that is enough time to get things rolling.




Unless of course, you scientist keep up the practice that you all have been hard at for the past 50 or so years with CC... coming up with and going to hundreds of gatherings/meetings trying to figure out why it is happening.



Instead of course, trying to figure out how mankind can adapt to this entity we call planet earth.

An ongoing changing entity amongst the billions and billions of other ever changing entities throughout the Universe.



CHANGE.... what a mtherfker.
The Chief

climber
Laughing at all the Sheep from atop the Hill
May 12, 2014 - 07:57pm PT
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Yup Fortmets shet himself, again. Uncontrollably. Right on cue. Odd thing about it, he simply opens his mouth and out it spews.
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
May 12, 2014 - 08:19pm PT
From the link,

. This is why we conclude that the disappearance of ice in this sector is unstoppable

That's quite a line^

Nature dropping ice cubes into warm water is maybe Her way of healing herself?

Watching video of the melting ice brought to me a feeling of sadness. We're seeing the exact time that ice berg decides to break off and drop into the water. It seems as if he's giving up. Giving in to the certainty of death once he mixes with water. Poo little Ice beeerg!(do that part with a Eddie Murphy voice). Seriously though, what are we do'in to save the Ice bergs? Do we got FEMA up there set'in up refrigerator tents yet? We could send in some bottled Evian water and pour it on them and maybe bring some bergs back to life?
Jus Try'in to be fun y

But in Reality. When we're seeing Ice, we're seein water at its lowest energy form. Less energy, less speed. But with lots of potential for change. Where'as we see water as a faster speed, with more energy. This is all in regards with the Sun and the speed of light ofcourse.
In Reality ice is moving up on the Evolutionary chart? And maybe Steam is Ice's Heaven?
Or Hedoublehokeysticks¡
rick sumner

Trad climber
reno, nevada/ wasilla alaska
May 12, 2014 - 08:40pm PT
Larry, your back. Last I heard , you had abandoned this shetfest in disgust, never to return. Anyway brother, what does all those zeta joules, impressively and scarily presented in the NOAA graph, actually add up to for a whole ocean temperature change? Furthermore, is that scary increase of somewhere in the neighborhood of one tenth of one degree within the margin of error, what is the chosen baseline, and considering the paucity of measurements before argo how can we take this seriously?
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