Cacit and Succulents (OT)

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Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Original Post - May 17, 2009 - 02:27pm PT
We all love cactus and succulents, some just like to check them out in habitat
others grow a few, some grow alot

Then there are others that take it on as climbing, another fanatical pursuit that envelopes their whole lives (as least a major part)

Thats me and a bunch of other folks, we belong to clubs, show our plants at Cacti and Succulent shows, and accumulate 100s to 1000s of different plants

WE grow them in the open, but mostly under shade cloth or in green houses

We buy new plants at nurseries, shows and over the internet.

Field collecting plants is frowned upon, since our goal is the preservation of the plants in habitat, and they should be protected

Please enjoy and post up your plants

Or if you need ID, growing tips or want to get more into the hobby, please post up (reduce file size for easy uploading)

I have 1000s of photos, heres a couple already loaded

Ariocarpus plants flowering

Copiapoa hypogeae 'Lizard Skin'

Copiapoa monstrose 1

Copiapoa monstrose 1

Haworthia truncata

Haworthia bayeri
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 17, 2009 - 02:43pm PT
How about those kids on Ebay smoking (ok... making tea) out of the San Pedros? You see the prices they are getting for a "cutting" of a midsection of these rigs?

Sometimes better than a buck an inch!

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2009 - 02:49pm PT
I'm lucky to have a wife that loves it as much as me,
We have about 3000 variates, some are very small, others look dead for half the year. For me, its a big science project, and keeping track of the names, origin, and cultivating needs are a pleasure

We grow and sell the rare and small types, along with rocks and gravel for the plants, which we don't grow, but collect
Heres a couple more from the other thread

Ariocarpus retusus, the favorite cactus of collectors


Turbinicarpus psuedopectinatus


Dinterantus pole-evansii


Lithops bella


Flowering stones, Pleiospilos nelii, the purple one are called "Royal Flush"
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 17, 2009 - 02:52pm PT
Trichocereus Grandiflorus

Mammillaria Compressa

Ferocactus Latispinus,
or Echinocactus Texensis

Opuntia Phaeacantha

Ferocactus Gracilis?

Echinopsis Hammerschmidii







Mammillaria Zeilmanniana?

From the other thread:

Echinopsis Hamatacantha

Astrophytum Ornatum

Echinopsis Hammerschmidii
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2009 - 03:30pm PT
Very nice Russ, you should try to post the names with them
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
May 17, 2009 - 03:34pm PT
I have never seen lithops flowering, too cool!
Jingy

Social climber
Flatland, Ca
May 17, 2009 - 04:44pm PT
Loving it!!!


I can stare at a good cactus for hours.
hooblie

climber
May 17, 2009 - 05:05pm PT
lithops are for pebble pinchers! love em. one actually came between me and an SO.

face down on the massage table there is still a view thru the face cradle. i have used a faceted crystal vase with a pincushion cactus surrounded by beads in the bottom. has a kaliedascopic, mandala like effect if perfectly placed and is an upgrade from looking at my toes
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
May 17, 2009 - 06:18pm PT
Does the DEA know you're growing some of those?
Those are so cool! I'm thinking many are from S. America?
The little 'rocks' are my favorite.

Took this last evening on Mt Wilson Trail. I call it an agave which I think is a succulent but I welcome enlightenment.

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2009 - 06:31pm PT
We only grow legal plants

But most importantly, would never recommend eating anything we grow, since we use harsh chemicals and pesticides

We don't grow organic herbs here, the plants are for the pleasure to grow only, and some species that are of interest to abusers,
take 10s of years to grow into a nice specimen, and eating it would be the last thing ever done, even it starts to die, it would be thrown away rather than eaten.
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
May 17, 2009 - 06:37pm PT
I was joking; not always apparent I realize.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2009 - 06:58pm PT
Cactuses aren't the on;y thing we grow, we like things with fat stem are roots too

Euphorbia poisonii


We grow Lithops from seed, heres a bunch of seedling pots, aren't they cute


Part of the Lithops collection


Heres a view of some cool cactuses

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2009 - 07:44pm PT
"Mommy, is that cactus plastic"
"No Timmy, it just looks like plastic"


"Mommy, what are those"
"Those are baby plastic plants from the plastic Mommy plant"

Gymnocalycium vatteri
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
May 17, 2009 - 07:55pm PT
Hey, so is Peyote a succulent, got any?

I got some pics coming up....
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
May 17, 2009 - 08:01pm PT
Wow, Dr. F -- we agree on something! I've always been interested in collecting cacti in particular (opuntia, cereus and mammalaria in particular), but stopped collecting about 45 years ago. All that is left is one enormous prickly pear at my mother's, that I grew from a cutting of a single pod. Now that I'm getting close to rejoining the plutocracy, I think it's time to head to the nursery. Thanks for the post.

John
sandsnow

Social climber
SoCal
May 17, 2009 - 08:04pm PT
Nice stuff Dr.F and Russ.

Just getting started with cacti. The cholla and beavertail were dug up from elsewhere on our property and transplanted. I hope that is not frowned upon. The cow's tounge and santa rita were cuttings given to me. The prickly pears (maybe not true name) are nursing along for transplant later. We're trying to round out our collection with native species before moving on to more non-native. We're really happy with our transplant sucess. Our ocotillo from Home Depot has flowered, but I don't have any pix. I never thought that thing would grow, looked frickin dead.

My biggest question is water. What would you recommend for these in the ground? Should we water less in the summer, since they don't get much water then? Is it ok to keep watering over the summer or will it hurt them?

Thanks

prickly pear


santa Rita


beaver tail


cow's tounge


cholla
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2009 - 09:12pm PT
Native cacti can be tricky
Some won't mind water at anytime
But the best schedule for US natives is heavy water in early Spring, dry late spring and early summer, and then more water in mid August to late Sept, and then dry winter

winter rains can be OK for some, an absolute no no for others.
sandsnow

Social climber
SoCal
May 17, 2009 - 09:16pm PT
Cool thanks.
dirtbag

climber
May 17, 2009 - 09:16pm PT
Beautiful!!!
Sir loin of leisure...

Trad climber
X
May 17, 2009 - 09:48pm PT
awesome...
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 18, 2009 - 11:24am PT
Mammillaria luethyi, very rare in cultivation


Lithops optica "rubra"
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 18, 2009 - 01:46pm PT
Them ruby Lithops look like they need to be lanced or biopsied!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 18, 2009 - 01:47pm PT
Bump for more folks to post

Matucana madsonsorium
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 18, 2009 - 01:52pm PT
Hey DrF: The last two years have some harsh cold out here on the sand for a few days. The snap wiped out about 50% of my specimens.

Do you have any (maybe 10?) recommendations for cold hardy cactus? Or, any variety that seems to handle it better than others?
klk

Trad climber
cali
May 18, 2009 - 02:11pm PT
wow, some really nice specimens. great shots, too.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 18, 2009 - 02:20pm PT
Fishy
The American native plants are obviously the best, since they live in the same enviro

There are alot of folks that grow in colder areas that have good luck with cold hardy species, I will get some more info

But I do know Echinocereus species, opunitas, Ferocactus are better than alot of plants

If you could put a tarp over the plants during freezes, it helps, or bring your plants indoors

Any time you grow plants in the ground, freezing temps and rodents will be a big problem

Most of my good plants are in a locked greenhouse that keeps bugs, rodents and freezing temps out
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 18, 2009 - 02:41pm PT
Tucker Tech's Wall Garden

I wasn't sure if Tucker has a camera or computer, so I thought I would post some photos I took at his Walled Palace
Todd Gordon took me over there during the Sushi Fest

Wall of Chollas


Opuntia pads over 18" across


Some type of Notocactus flowering


Oreocereus, cold hardy from the Andes


This is a rare plant from Death Valley area and into Nevada and Arizona, its one I don't have yet, and coveted this nice specimen,
Todd Gordon said he found it in Sedona, and gave it to Tucker
Sclerocactus johnstonii
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
May 18, 2009 - 03:10pm PT
Oreocereus, cold hardy from the Andes

I have one of those, isn't it also nicknamed 'Old Man of the Andes'?

Mine never flower though, I think I may need hit 'em with some cactus juice or something.

I used to have one of these babies, but it died.
Ah, the link ain't working. It's a 'black tree', aeonium
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
May 18, 2009 - 03:40pm PT
Dr F and Russ Walling,

Thanks for the excellent pictures. I've keyed out a few of the native barrels, opuntias, mammalarias and such but am marveling at the sheer diversity from your collections.

Russ, you mention San Pedro being sold for money. BITD a friend and I went door to door in So Cal asking for San Pedro cuttings for our "collection". Many said to take all we wanted. Even got some from a huge display at the OC courthouse in Santa Ana. No shortage of the stuff so don't know who would pay for it.

After trial and error, we came up with a usable recipe: Place several one foot sections on a baking tray. Stab them all over with a fork. Put in freezer overnight. Take out the next day and thaw. Collect all the juice in a pot and discard the sections (compost, people, compost). Boil down the vile juice into a bitter goo (reduction). Drink a shot glass worth of the most horrible flavor known to humans (makes peyote taste like candy in comparison). Chase with peanut butter. Wait about an hour then discard ego. 1 foot section = shot glass of goo.
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 18, 2009 - 03:44pm PT
TTR: what is sorta interesting about the SanPedro deal.... you can sell them, in sections, with just a straight cut. But, if you peel them, mash them, or manipulate them in any way, or try to sell just the skin, or just the core, it is illegal. It is then considered a "manufactured drug" by the Man. Interesting, and probably true.
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
May 18, 2009 - 03:49pm PT
russ, I've heard the same about San Pedro and for Asian Poppies, OK to grow them but as soon as you slit one the wrong way you've just opened yourself to the possibility of a surprise visit.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 18, 2009 - 07:59pm PT
I can't believe I spelt the title wrong "Cacit", what the hell, I need to watch what I say, LOL

Here's a couple more
Faucaria tubercolusa "Super Warty"


Todays Flower
Notocactus rosioflorus


Astrophytums


Grafted plants are cool
mongrel

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
May 18, 2009 - 08:37pm PT
Let's see if this works:



Echinocereus rigidissimus as an alien being

Somewhere I've got a good Selenicereus image or two, I'll post one later and bump this back up to pg. 1.
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
May 18, 2009 - 10:52pm PT
mongrel, your cactus is smiling.

Calling Dr F- Do those grafts only work if both are from the same genus? More excellent creatures, thanks for growing and posting.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2009 - 11:16am PT
Mongrel, nice plant, I have three

On grafting, the plants need to be in the same Family, not the genius level

So its cacti on cacti

The bottom plant (stock) has strong roots, fast growth and a long growing season
The top plant (scion)is usually slow growing, has sensitive roots, and difficult to grow, and hence highly desirable

Some grafted plants are degrafted after they are big enough, and rerooted; some will never live long off the graft

Plants are casually classified by their availability and growing ease,
common means easily grown and can be found in many nurseries

medium difficulty means less available, and more difficult to keep alive, needs some special treatment, like no water in the winter

Difficult plants means; easy to kill, and harder to find because they take very special growing conditions that only experts growers will provide
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2009 - 11:55am PT
Heres todays flower
Thelocactus heterochromus
nita

climber
chica from chico, I don't claim to be a daisy
May 19, 2009 - 12:08pm PT
Are you giving home garden tours?
wtfd

climber
May 19, 2009 - 01:29pm PT
any psychoactive varieties?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2009 - 01:50pm PT
We have folks over all the time,
and sell plants and rocks
If truly interested, send a PM

And how many times will I have to say something about psycoactive plants
we do not grow them and would never recommend eating anything we grow, since we use to many poisonous chemicals on them, and maybe toxic to eat, they are toxic to bugs
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
May 19, 2009 - 02:36pm PT
Sickness! I'm another sucker for a good succulent. Do you have any of these?






Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2009 - 02:45pm PT
Very nice photos
Those are some kind of Dudleya
They can be identified from habitat location, where are those from

I have about 10 different Dudleya species, but not sure if I have that one, maybe
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
May 19, 2009 - 04:04pm PT
I have Sulcorebutia rauschii (red form) that just put on an impressive show. It's from the high desert of Bolivia and is very cold hardy, as are all the cacti from there (keep very dry during the cold) (Rebutia spp, Lobivia spp) The Echinopsis genus also seems to be cold hardy.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2009 - 04:44pm PT
Heres my Sulcorebutia raushii, green form, I have red, purple, dark green and golden spined forms, they are great plants
Indianclimber

Trad climber
Lost Wages
May 19, 2009 - 07:04pm PT
This popped up on my quote of the day screen

I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, Damn. I am less nurturing than a desert.
- Demetri Martin
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2009 - 10:11pm PT
A couple more, I hope know one is opposed to seeing these

Echinocereus ridigissimus varieties


A Difficult plant
Mammillaria theresae


Mammillaria humboltii

Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
May 19, 2009 - 10:52pm PT


anyone know what this is? A euphorbia, maybe?
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
May 20, 2009 - 12:21am PT
It looks like Viper Bugloss, a member of the Borage family (Forget-Me-Nots):



http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/carr/boragin.htm
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 20, 2009 - 12:40am PT
Russell, funny you should mention San Pedro. Dr. F may have a story about the naming of a route of ours on Tahquitz, it is called "Snakes on Everything." There was a house in Hemet with an extensive cacti garden......




Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 20, 2009 - 12:48pm PT
Nice shots DE
The top garden has several very large Boojum Trees
Those are from Baja, and quite hard to grow and very slow
They may have been collected from the wild, which was common back in the day

The look like upside down carrots
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 20, 2009 - 01:19pm PT
I must confess those shots are from the "Wild Animal Park." We went Sunday. The "Baja" desert and native CA plant areas are awesome.
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
May 20, 2009 - 01:51pm PT
Best I reckon, the first ones I posted are Canyon Dudleya, in a volcanic area in the foothills, and the coastal ones are Powdery Dudleya.
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 20, 2009 - 03:18pm PT
I really enjoyed all the plants at the WAP.





Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 20, 2009 - 05:28pm PT
DE, I thought that looked a little too good for a garden
The above photos are of Epiphyllums, or orcihd cactus
They are tropical cacti that live in trees, there are 100s of flowering varieties

Heres a couple more

Echinocereus knippinanus


Strombocactus esperanzae


Strange succulent that dries up completely in the summer, and these green growths come out in the fall
Monilaria globosa


Conophytum obcordeleum


A gaggle of mesembs

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 20, 2009 - 05:29pm PT
DE, I thought that looked a little too good for a garden
The above photos are of Epiphyllums, or orcihd cactus
They are tropical cacti that live in trees, there are 100s of flowering varieties

Heres a couple more

Echinocereus knippinanus


Strombocactus esperanzae


Strange succulent that dries up completely in the summer, and these green growths come out in the fall
Monilaria globosa


Conophytum obcordeleum


A gaggle of mesembs

Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
May 20, 2009 - 05:52pm PT
Those are so amazing! I love the Monolaria globosa. Where's it from?

So I took this shot of an agave Saturday evening.




Went up there last night and it had grown a good 30-32" in 3 days! The top of the previous picture would have been the very bottom of this one! That comes out to about 7/16" per hour!!!!
And this thing is sitting on a bone dry hillside.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 21, 2009 - 12:38pm PT
A lot of the really cool succulents like the Monilaria above, are from South Africa
Lithops, conophytums, monilaria, the tiger jaws are all in the same family, which are generally called Ice Plants
We call then Mesembs, short for the subfamily name mesembrayencea...(sp?), and they are all from South Africa

Another interesting thing about cactuses, which are succulents but all in the plant family Cactacae,
They are only from the Americas, North, Central and South

Only one species of cactus is found naturally outside of the Americas, and its found in Madagascar, and is thought to have floated there in the long time past
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 21, 2009 - 12:46pm PT
Reilly
If your plant is a native, it must be a Yucca, called Spanish Bayonette, or sometimes Spanish Dagger
Stephen McCabe

Trad climber
near Santa Cruz, CA
May 22, 2009 - 04:35am PT
Going back to Jerry’s post, a technical source to help identify Dudleya is a new key at http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/jepsonmanual/review/
As with any Dudleya key, not every individual plant will key out well.
Knowing where they come from helps with the identification of dudleyas, but sometimes there are 3 or 4 species in the same place and some are very difficult to identify.
... they don’t always grow on good quality rock.

Many species of Dudleya are endangered and very rare. I've had friends from both Baja California and California describe them as charismatic.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 22, 2009 - 12:24pm PT
Nice Dudleya garden, that looks like a University greenhouse

I love Dudleyas, and just counted my collection, 12 species

I gave been breaking up some big clusters and selling them, they go fast
I bunch of volunteer seedlings of D. edulus came up this spring, I didn't expect that
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
May 22, 2009 - 12:38pm PT
Dudleya is fascinating. They grow in the darnedest places. They will wash around in the ocean for a long time then wash up on a rocky shore and keep growing. I love finding them up on the cliffs, just hanging out up there.

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 22, 2009 - 12:46pm PT
I hope I'm not the only one keeping this thread alive,
If you want the photos to keep coming, since I have 1000s
Bump up the thread after you check it out, Thanks

Todays Flowers
Lobivia thionatha v. glauca


Lobivia haemathantha v. rebutioides


Sulcorebutia raushii collection, several color forms and some other Sulcorebutias


These are Welwitschia mirabilis, from South Africa
One of the most interesting plants, due to the fact that they are related to Cycads, and there no living relatives of them,

They are from the age of the Dinosaurs, with little evolutionay change since then. They are slow growing and kind of difficult. I've been lucky to get seeds and have a bunch of seedlings going.

These big ones I bought, and are about 12 years old


scuffy b

climber
Bad Brothers' Bait and Switch Shop
May 22, 2009 - 02:27pm PT
Dudleya are flowering in the Merced River Canyon now.
There are some right at the stoplight at the west end of the
detour.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 22, 2009 - 11:10pm PT
Heres my Dudleya section

These are the best species
D. brittonii, upper left; D anthonyi, lower left; D. pachyphytum, right

Stenocactus multicostus, with >100 ribs

This an interesting bulb from South Africa
Albuca spiralis


You won't see this mesemb at Home Depot
Didymaotus lapidiformis

Close-up of another cool mesemb
Lapidaria margeritae
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 22, 2009 - 11:25pm PT
Here is a link to my thread on a Cactus forum, I have 28 pages and update frequently, and of course it gets better as get you near the end

http://www.cactiguide.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7179&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15

Here is a link to the main page, that is good for ID, and other info

http://www.cactiguide.com/
scuffy b

climber
Sinatra to Singapore
May 26, 2009 - 09:36pm PT
The Dudleya along hwy 108 around 6000 ft elevation are pushing
out their inflorescences now, probably flowering in a couple
weeks.

Anybody know if the ones along the Merced Canyon below the Park
are still flowering?
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 26, 2009 - 09:51pm PT
SPIKE BUMP
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 26, 2009 - 10:52pm PT
Thanks Russ
Todays flowers, one thing for sure, spring is the time for cactus flowers,

This one is about to flower, but has such cool buds, I thought it was worthy of a post, since its rare, its related to cholla
Puna bonnieae, from Argentia

Thelocactus bicolor v. schwartzii, Mex


Echinocereus puchella, Mex


These would be the furry Mammillaria s. Mex


Here is an Epiphyllum hybrid called Pegusus, it is a common one, but spectacular

This one was blooming today, I don't know of its name, but a nice pastel pink
klk

Trad climber
cali
May 26, 2009 - 10:54pm PT
wow, no wonder you dont climb anymore dood.

rad pix.
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 26, 2009 - 11:06pm PT
I had a bunch of this variety (I think) and they all died..... damn.....

from Dr.F's photo above: Stenocactus multicostus, with >100 ribs

They are pretty damn cool and for sure one of my faves.

Edit: take that back... though to me they look real similar.... I had the Echinofossulocactus Pentacanthus

(not my pic)

Also like the Neochilenia Paucicostata type stuff.

(not my pic....)
scuffy b

climber
Sinatra to Singapore
May 27, 2009 - 11:37am PT
Kale Bump
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 27, 2009 - 09:28pm PT
Echinofossulocactus and Stenocactus are the same, I think the Echino name is the best current name, but Steno is easier to say

I have some seedlings, I can set you up with a great rack for the full range of crack sizes
Neochiliana are also the same as Neoportaria, I'm not sure if posted any yet, but I have alot of diff. types, they are from Argentina and Chili
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 29, 2009 - 12:09pm PT
Yesterdays flowers

Notocactus roseolutens


Escobaria minima


Mammillaria guelzowiana


Mammillaria nivosa, neat red fruit pods. Its always best to have two separate plants of the ones you like, so you can cross pollinate


Psuedolithos cubiensis, from Somalia, it is a succulent in the milkweed family, and the flowers smell like rooting corpses to attrack flys. Considered to be quite difficult to keep alive.

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 29, 2009 - 12:32pm PT
Psuedolithos cubiensis

That rig is cool!!!111666
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 29, 2009 - 05:53pm PT
Hey Russ, whats 111666 mean, I'm slow on the lingo

Succulents
Adromiscus herrei

A different one


Some mesembs (ice plants)

3 Dinteranthus pole-evansii, one with flower bud fist


Lithops cultivar "Hammer Ruby"


Gibbaeum pillosulum, with alittle peach fuzz

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
May 29, 2009 - 05:56pm PT
Well.... if !!!!! means I'm excited..... then !!!111 means I'm so excited that I could not hold the shift key down anymore...... then !!!!!1111666 means I'm so excited that I had to invoke the sign of the Beast to show even more appreciation.

Kids these days.....

Great stuff Dr. F!!!!1111666

Dig these pics and info.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
May 29, 2009 - 07:16pm PT
This,



came from this



these photos are from April 2008, that cactus now towers over my 5'4" daughter (also I've lost 20 pounds)
scuffy b

climber
Sinatra to Singapore
May 29, 2009 - 07:21pm PT
Dr F, do you mean Milkweed family, as in Aesclepiadaceae?

It tickles me to see all these way remote (taxonomically)
groups all bundled into the label "succulents" and think that
at least for some people, "succulents" must be realated to
each other.

You are posting up an amazing set of photos. Keep it up, if that's possible.

Thanks
Lovegasoline

Trad climber
Sh#t Hole, Brooklyn, NY
May 29, 2009 - 09:09pm PT
Nice energy here!

I've owned exactly one cactus bought when I was a kid in the 1970's at Murphy's Mart. We bought a glass pot and bags of colored sand and made sand terrarium designs (in my case a red sun setting on warm colored mountain landscape). Sat in the bay window of our house in Randallstown, Md. That was when trippy colored sand terrariums were riding tall in pop culture ... or at least in pop horti-culture.


I have a few questions.
I'm ready to cultivate more space in my Brooklyn, NY apartment. I'm taking over two more rooms and converting one to a living room of sorts. The living room has two large windows facing West which get light from about noon until sunset. I want to put some effort in decorating and laying out the room and I'd like to bring some of the desert vibe here and cactus would be a part of that. It would be cool to have a quadrant like a slice of J-Tree, cactus, some rock energy, and I can move my aquatic turtle's tank in there as well (had a dream this week of a 6' turtle and 6' lizard fighting each other in a McDonald's parking lot - they had their teeth and claws filed down for the fight and it was an even match. At one point they were in a death grip like two boxers with the turtle getting worked so it sucked its head inside...the lizard stabbed it's head inside the turtles neck-hole(!) and started biting around in there, pretty dramatic, no paydirt though. Lots of traffic whizzing by as this McDonalds was built on a highway median). So what is your opinion of growing some of these cacti indoors in Brooklyn?

I am entranced by the modular plastic looking ones and the ones that look like frozen juice treats. The spiny stuff is classically cool and the flowering stuff is a nice bonus. The modular stuff is a show stopper and could spark off forms in my painting ...almost look edible and people would need to be warned about putting them into their mouths. I could let the turtle crawl around in there if he learns quick enough not to get stuck too much…he’s reckless at times and he doesn’t seem to care about crawling over the edges of things and falling onto the floor. He’s kind of eager. He’ll fit right in.

Scale
Also, maybe consider placing something in your images for scale, or give a quote on dimensions: it's difficult to discern if some of these are 1" tall or 5 feet tall.
When I was in my first years of solo backpacking, I’d been in NYC a year without being in nature…and a year or more straight in the city fixes one’s head in a certain place readying one for total contrast tactics like deep immersion in nature adventure. So I hitchhiked to Tennessee's Great Smokey Mountains during 4th of July. I got there at night completely clueless (just a roadmap, no research, dark: just how I like it) and a lone gas station attendant on graveyard shift told me the Ranger station was closed and if I was stealthy I could find a jogger’s trail in the woods nearby and probably bivy undetected as long as I got up early, then I could continue following it and it would lead to the park. It had been raining like hell and had just stopped and I was a year long city boy…now I’m in a dark woods with a sharp transition…mythically sharp. It was hot and humid causing a steamy sepulchral fog to rise from trench like depression in the earth paralleling the trail making it appear as if cannons had recently been fired. I was now cut off from civilization…just dark woods, wood sounds, smells, wide eyes, and forest steam. I got deeper into the woods and it became darker, almost pitch black. I became mesmerized when I saw something tiny faintly glowing on the ground in front of me. It was foxfire, a phosphorescent fungus that glows in the dark (I had seen that a year previous on the AT)! I was entranced watching it glowing there and it brought home how wondrous it is to walk in the woods alone at night. I walked towards it and bent down to get a closer look and I realized it wasn’t on the ground directly in front of me, but was actually a little distance away. It was dark, so there was no visual reference to any other objects to determine scale, just the faint glowing. As I looked, my brain was processing the visual information trying to calculate size, luminosity, and distance. It could have been small, dim, and close or big, bright, and far away… all the while registering the same size in the pitch black darkness. My initial perception was wrong and I started thinking it was maybe pretty far from me, about 200 feet and brighter than foxfire. But what was it? I could make out thaty actually it was two glowing things, not one, and that they were about 50 feet away from me. As soon as I registered that, they slowly moved across my path. Interesting and now I was feeling some apprehension. I wasn’t sure what it was but all of a sudden their movement suddenly became very rapid, RAPID! and I realized too late that it definitely wasn’t glowing fungi but was an animal’s eyes reflecting light back to me…and suddenly it was running directly towards me at high speed! I instantly filled with adrenaline and was about to bail at full speed but I knew it was too late and it was going to catch me! Shit! I recoiled and braced for the impact but it narrowly missed me and veered to my left side making a weird swooshing pneumatic sound as it passed. I grasped that it was a car’s tires on the wet asphalt road that closely paralleled the running trail I was on…I could now see the headlamps cutting a path through the fog... and the road...as the car hugged the languid curves.

I'm ready for cactus tips, lay it on me!


PS: any sand terrarium design pics?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 30, 2009 - 11:01am PT
Lovie, thats a big story about who knows what

But to answer your questions
My plants are mostly small, from 1" to 1 foot, and in small pots

I would not recommend terrariums for cacti, not enough air movement, too humid, and no water holes in the bottom. Some people have success, I wouldn't even try, since I do everything to possible to give the plants the best growing environment.

My sister lives in Seattle area and has 100 different small plants on her window sill, they do great. I thought they would suffer, but she has green thumb and grows difficult plants I give her with ease.

I suggest to most people to buy stuff from their local nursery, and after they have about 100, and still want more, then they need to see a specialist, like me for the really cool species.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 30, 2009 - 08:02pm PT
Basic cultivation tips would be:

Use a soil with a lot of extra grit, like pumice, perlite, and sand
I buy normal potting mix, mix in another 1/2 portion pumice and a 1/4 sand.

After planting, don't water or put in strong sun for a week or two.

Making cuttings of most cacti and succulents is easy, after cutting with a clean knife, let sit in the shade for 2-3 weeks before planting to be rooted.

Use small pots, clay is over rated, plastic or ceramic are better, make sure it has really good holes in the bottom, if they are lame, drill some more.

Water in the spring, summer and early fall. Most plants would rather be dry and cold in the winter, but below 40 F is not recommended for sensitive plants, but many can go to 20 for a day or two
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
May 30, 2009 - 08:10pm PT
If you're taking Hwy 120 to Yosemite stop by Poot's House of Cactus on the north side of the road 17229 E Hwy 120; 9-5 Mon-Sat; 599-7241; just a few miles east of Ripon.

I was just there. A grand display of a great many cactii.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - May 30, 2009 - 08:14pm PT
Todays action

This would be referred to as a miniature potted plant.

Aviona quinaria, from S. Africa, in habitat the stem would be buried, and only the little worms would be above ground


Copiapoa's, from Chili


Tylecodon's from S. Africa. They will lose their leaves in summer, and regrow a bunch of new ones next fall.


Here is some of our big cacti outside, which aren't that big, the biggest is 4' tall


This is a section of the Lithops collection

vlani

Trad climber
mountain view, ca
Jun 3, 2009 - 01:38am PT










vlani

Trad climber
mountain view, ca
Jun 3, 2009 - 02:05am PT















Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 3, 2009 - 09:34pm PT
Thanks Vlan
They are superb
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jun 3, 2009 - 10:11pm PT
This weekend Scuffy made a valiant effort to explain to me, the cross lineage of Sedum, Dudleyas and hens and chicks, I may be starting to get this...
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 3, 2009 - 10:23pm PT
Do you mean, evolutionary heritage

They are related

There are 6 Families of succulents that comprise 90% of all

They Cacti, Euphorbia, Crassula, Mesembs (ice plant), Aloe and Agave

And there are more than 5000 species and varieties of plants in these 6 families

5-10 more families have succulent species of interest
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
Jun 3, 2009 - 11:47pm PT
Hey Dr F,

Does Lewisia (Bitteroot) count as a succulent? The leaves are juicy in the spring but dry up after flowering.

Photo from Table Mt., Oroville CA


EDIT Nice pictures vlani, really beautiful

Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 4, 2009 - 12:06am PT


Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jun 4, 2009 - 12:18am PT
Great pics all!!!
Stephen McCabe

Trad climber
near Santa Cruz, CA
Jun 5, 2009 - 12:53am PT
Yet another use for old climbing ropes. Use two to belay your cactus friends down from a balcony. Once it was over the edge we almost wanted an anchor. They are heavier than they look.



Very easy stem move.




Stephen McCabe

Trad climber
near Santa Cruz, CA
Jun 5, 2009 - 01:03am PT
Why did we need to do this? Well, we took the “small” one on a dolly/hand truck through the apartment and down the indoor stairs. The big one was too tall for either staircase.



Note the circular outdoor staircase.


Here’s a picture of the small one after the move.

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2009 - 04:40pm PT
Nice stuff
Cacti flowers

Ariocarpus fissuratus


another form of Ariocarpus fissuratus


Turbinicarpus alosoni


Matucana formosa


Mammillaria pectinata
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2009 - 04:44pm PT
Some succulents

Lithops lesleii v. abinica


Lithops meyerii


Agyroderma sp.


Antimima sp.


Monilaria grande, start of fall growing season


Plumaria
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2009 - 11:06pm PT
Any one got some photos
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jun 8, 2009 - 01:31am PT
BUUUUUUUUUUUUUUMP!!!!!11111666
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 8, 2009 - 02:47am PT
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Jun 8, 2009 - 03:16am PT
Picture taken today in Tucker Tech's garden...

Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 8, 2009 - 03:22am PT
There are some beautiful pics of blooms here. I was just curious as the aromas of any of these flowers. Can we get some descriptions?
scuffy b

climber
Sinatra to Singapore
Jun 9, 2009 - 07:10pm PT
I bump for Kale.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 9, 2009 - 09:47pm PT
Todays flowers (not really, but a good caption for anything with in season flowers)
Echinocereus reichenbachii v. reich.., from Texas, I saw some near Austrin when I was there.


Escobaria minima


Very rare at this size, usually about 1x2"
Mammillaria pectinifera


Echinopsis hybrid I grew from seed, Tuckers Plant is one of these.
I named it "Ripe Salmon", for the hell of it, its like naming a route that no one will ever do
Double D

climber
Jun 9, 2009 - 09:58pm PT
Dr. F that's an impressive collection...really a collection of a lifetime.

If I can't eat it...it dies.
S.Powers

Social climber
Jtree, now in Alaska
Jun 10, 2009 - 04:21am PT
bump for no climbing content
MisterE

Trad climber
One Step Beyond!
Jun 10, 2009 - 09:57am PT
I've got these:

Not pretty. Just weird.






They are HUGE (like 10 inches across) and flies dig them.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 10, 2009 - 11:41am PT
Mister E, you got a nice speciman of Stapelia gigantia
the flowers smell like rotting flesh, and the hairs make the flies think its a dead animal

You also got a Gasteria species on the left

Ed's plant (top of page) is also a Gasteria, I think G. glomuata, nicely grown
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 12, 2009 - 10:32pm PT
New installment

This is for Russ, your Neochilenia paucicostata in the book
is it the same plant?


Here is a related plant Neoportaria (or Neochilenia) crispa


I posted a smaller one of these earlier, the big one finally flowered
Sulcorebuta raushii, green form


This plant has grown a little wild, usually its a 3 inch single headed tiny thing
Turbinicarpus minimus


I will show another photo of this with flowers open, if the sun ever comes out again, the june gloom this year has been a little grim
Rebutia heliosa v. cajasensis


This is one of the rarest cacti for most collectors, but I specialize in rare, so I have many rarer. From Mex.
Its best to have two, so you can cross pollinate and make seeds
Pelecyphora strobiliformis

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jun 12, 2009 - 11:02pm PT
Outstanding good Dr.!

That appears to be the same plant.... I'll look for my pics to confirm.
bwancy1

Trad climber
Here
Jun 26, 2009 - 05:37pm PT
The bottom 2 lobes on my Lapidaria Margaretae are starting to shrivel. I understand that they should not be watered during the dormant period (summer?), and the growth period is spring (right now). I would have expected the shriveling to occur at the end of summer...

I am very reluctant to water it, but I am concerned about the shriveling.

Any watering advice?
franky

Trad climber
Davis, CA
Jun 26, 2009 - 05:39pm PT
One of the best things about hiking in the desert is eating prickly pear fruit, just kick them off and roll them in the sand for awhile, usually gets all the little spines, although sometimes you still end up with that fiberglass feeling in your fingertips.
captaintight

Boulder climber
San Diego
Jun 27, 2009 - 01:00pm PT
Wow! I was just recently tuned in to the sport of rock climbing by a friend. Following my natural instincts to find out as much information as I could, I stumbled upon this forum, and to my surprise there are cactus and succulent lovers who are climbers too! Thanks to this forum in particular and this post specifically, I believe I have found a new community where common ground is shared on at least two fronts! Thus, I want to use this space to introduce myself, and keep Dr. F’s dream – this post- alive.

My name is Danny, screen name captaintight. I’ve been an “outdoorsmen” thriving in Southern Utah, Southern Nevada and now Southern California as well as Yosemite – my first love. Hoping to bring some of nature’s beauty into my city dwelling, I have amassed a small collection of cactus and succulents - as many as my downtown loft will allow. My collection is nothing close to the level of yours, Dr. F, but it is a start. I’ve been collecting for a little under a year, and need more space. Your collection is amazing – well grown, diverse and rare. You have species that I have only read about! Thanks for sharing your pictures and information!!

Here are some pics of my collection, I hope you enjoy:




























Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 30, 2009 - 05:02pm PT
Glad to see some new posts
I will get some new photos up soon

Danny, you got a great start on a nice collection
For a great forum check, My screen name is C&D, also check Vlad, he is a climber too.
http://cactiguide.com/forum/

bwancy - water those Lapidarias, they like it from March til Oct. Love those plants, I will post more
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 30, 2009 - 05:39pm PT
Had these photos were handy

Morning buds on Notocactus magnificus


Ortegocactus macdougallii

Copiapoa laui

Lithops helmutii



tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Jun 30, 2009 - 06:41pm PT
Threads like this are why I love the taco!
captaintight

Boulder climber
San Diego
Jun 30, 2009 - 07:02pm PT
Damn! You've got some good stuff doc!!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2009 - 11:24am PT
2 bumps to get past the captains stuff,
takes too long to download
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2009 - 11:26am PT
Remember folks
you need to reduce the file size of the photos

I use windows picture manager
and reduce to the DOC setting
which is about 500kb
bwancy1

Trad climber
Here
Jul 1, 2009 - 11:28am PT
bump for new page
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jul 1, 2009 - 11:30am PT
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2009 - 12:11pm PT
New stack of cool stuff
Heres the flowers from the same plant with the closed buds shown before
Notocactus magnificus

Borizcactus samipatatus (spelling?)

Eriosyce aurata

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2009 - 12:16pm PT
Now some succulents

Lapidaria margaretae


Argyroderma congregatum


Avonia quinaria, potted as a miniture

looking up at the base
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2009 - 09:28pm PT
I like those shots Dr. F
Ezra

Social climber
WA, NC, Idaho Falls
Jul 1, 2009 - 10:04pm PT
Beautiful succulents
klk

Trad climber
cali
Jul 1, 2009 - 10:53pm PT
i like those shots dr. f
Lynne Leichtfuss

Social climber
valley center, ca
Jul 2, 2009 - 01:21am PT



Here's a bouquet and a close up for you Dr. F. Sure had fun at Gordo's and meeting you and Hashbro again....Peace and Joy, Lynne




Not the greatest photos, but it's the thought that counts...ya ?


micronut

Trad climber
fresno, ca
Jul 2, 2009 - 01:48am PT
Awesome. Those Lapidaria are so cool. Nice work.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 2, 2009 - 05:28pm PT
Nice pants lynne

This one lives in Texas and Mexico
Ariocarpus fissuatus

This one is a different form of the above


Aztekium hintonii, discovered in 1996, Mex, very rare


More Lithops,

Dinteranthus microspermus

Conophytum pellicidum

Muiria hortinsense, cracking open to expose the flower, one of the rarest plants in cultivation
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 3, 2009 - 12:09pm PT
No one likes my latest installment

I think I will cry, waaaaah
Lynne Leichtfuss

Social climber
valley center, ca
Jul 3, 2009 - 01:31pm PT
Have a JIB and relax. They're all beautiful, but it's a holiday !
Cheers, Lynne
Phantom X

Trad climber
Honeycomb Hideout
Jul 3, 2009 - 06:23pm PT
Dr. F, with the exception of your latest installment, my family has greatly enjoyed your cacit photo-rama/extravaganza. My wife has been repeativly oooing and wowing. I was too at first. Then her exclamations hybridized into a "ooo/wow" and it wasn't long until they mutated into "I'm going shopping". The total was over $300!!(semps and hueffelii, not one cacit!) Thanks a whole lot Dr. F, that was supposed to be my K2 fund. I was planning to climb K2, return and ridicule lesser climbers (mostly from Poway, Santa Monica, The Bay Area and Colorado) and their insignificant puny achivments. Anyway, you seem to be very knowledgeable and I would like to ask you where can one buy those tiny square plastic pots in quanity at wholesale discount?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2009 - 11:16pm PT




Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2009 - 11:19pm PT



Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jul 12, 2009 - 07:07pm PT
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jul 12, 2009 - 07:15pm PT
Magnificent all and esp you good Dr.....


So, tell me... how did you get started in the C/S hobby/business? And when?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2009 - 09:04pm PT
Russie
I started ~15 years ago, after I screwed my knee Tele skiing (ACL replacement surg)
needed a new hobby to keep me sane as I hobbled around

I got some Lithops, and after killing them, I got serious and started reading and talking to the experts
Now I am Vice President of the OCCSS and am the expert
I got two green houses, and another 100 square ft of outside tables

We are having a Show and sale on July 23-26 at the UC Fullerton Arb.
Everyone should come, Denise, my wife will be there for the entire time, I will be there on and off. Look for "GNG" our company name

Sulcorebutia raushii variations




Adromischus hallii
eKat

Trad climber
BITD2
Jul 12, 2009 - 09:22pm PT
This is the most fascinating thread to ever grace the doorstep of TheTacoStand. I stand in awe of your little garden. . . and your pots are rad.

I really like the furry little peace sign plants.

Keep the MAGIC alive.

ox

eKat
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
Jul 12, 2009 - 10:51pm PT
Dr F,

I chime in from time to time but mostly marvel at your offerings. Keep 'em coming. Looks like you have enough variety to always have something in bloom. Are there species that bloom in the fall?

How often do you get to show your stuff at CSU, Fullerton? Can't make it there late July but once or twice a year I end up 1 or 2 towns over.

signed, fellow acl tele blow out compadre, andy

ps ed h, thanks for your offerings as well
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jul 12, 2009 - 10:53pm PT
Bravo Dr. F!

Besides being a Cacti Savant™ you were the only guy I've ever seen that could actually Teli ski..... The ONLY one. And thats a lot of season passes at Mammoth, continuously watching the short bus alpaca hat bad knickers slow motion archaic poseurs roll down hill......
nita

climber
chica from chico, I don't claim to be a daisy
Jul 12, 2009 - 11:54pm PT
Calling DR F,

Here's a picture of my sick baby. Please help. Is there anything that can be done?
thanks for any advice, nita



EDIT: Thanks Doc!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2009 - 11:59pm PT
Part of your plant looks good,
You should take it out of the pot, and cut off the dead part, it may of self healed and the dead part will just flake off, if the main part is mushy, cut it off, and let dry in a shaded area for a week or two then try to reroot

It needs more sunlight, it should look like this
Gymnocalycium damsii
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2009 - 12:11am PT
We have a show in December too, there are 2 other big shows at the Huntington and the LA Arb.
The Intercity show late August at the LA Arb. is the biggest in the World, we will be entering show plants

To answer another ?, yes, there are flowers blooming all year long, spring and fall are the best

Heres another stack of photos, I have 1000s
Related to the plant above
Gymnocalycium friedrichii

Copiapoa krainzii

another C. krainzii

Eriosyce aurata

Echinocereus rigidissimus and E. rubispinus (rt.)

Sale plants, Trichocereus sp.


A pot of Lithops seedlings, all from the same mom

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 16, 2009 - 08:55pm PT
Euphorbia obesa's, the big one is 12" tall

There are alot of different Euphorbia medusa species


This Ariocarpus retusus is very rock like


Mammillaria crucigera grows into a big mound after 30 years
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 16, 2009 - 09:02pm PT
Some odd stuff

Grafted Rebutia crest


This is a chimera, two different plant species growing together in one plant. The red Gymno was grafted on a another species, and that species somehow seeped into the red plant, and formed the chimera.
The green part is when the graft stock gets a good growth zone, and the red is when the green part isn't growing, alittle complicated, but well understood.


Seedlings of rare species are grafted onto this stem like cactus species

This is one of the rarest Cactusus, Yavia crytocarpa, grafted by me
dfrost7

Social climber
Jul 16, 2009 - 09:09pm PT
I'm very impressed. Thanks for mentioning the Arboretum show. That's really near where I live. I love that place. Be looking for you guys. What is the succulent that looks like a "Y" or "V"?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 16, 2009 - 09:14pm PT
Looks like a Y?
I need a little more info
dfrost7

Social climber
Jul 16, 2009 - 09:24pm PT
It's on the previous page - about post 133. It has a green ball at the base and a "Y" or "V" shape. These are so nice. Thank you for posting them!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 16, 2009 - 09:33pm PT
You mean these Monilaria's

These are very specialized plants that only about 10 people in the US have, I have some seedlings, and after you grow 1000 other plants of easier culture, I will give you one
dfrost7

Social climber
Jul 16, 2009 - 09:39pm PT
Yes, those are the ones. They're lovely. I can't imagine how interesting they are in person.
Are they at the arboretum with you when you go? I never had a plant
collection. It looks like you have certainly done your research and diligence. The closest I came was a visit to California Carnivores in No. Cal. years ago.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 16, 2009 - 09:53pm PT
You have good taste, they are more better in person,

BUT, they only look like that for a couple months per year, and in spring they start to dry up and by summer, they look like this


and this being the problem, they are dormant, and if you water them now, they will rot. And will die if put out in the scorching sun. I have them in the shade, and mist them once in awhile. In Sept, I will start watering slowly, and bring them back to life, and mid winter, they need alot of water-for a month or two
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 16, 2009 - 10:03pm PT
Someone asked about flowering during the year. We have so many plants, that not a day goes by without something in flower, there are probably 30 plants in flower today.
Here are some Faucaria's in flower, they open in late afternoon.

Here are a couple of Japanese Faucaria cultivar hybrids.


The Japanese, Germans, Cezchs, Italians and Brits are totally in to growing cacti and succulents, and we get a lot of great stuff from them.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 17, 2009 - 01:22pm PT
Some more Mesembs from South Africa

Lithops optica "rubra"

Argyrodermas

Phylobollus flower

Another Monalaria, we call these gummi worms
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 17, 2009 - 01:23pm PT
Some more Cactuses
Ariocarpus retusus

Ariocarpus kotche.....too hard to spell

Tephorcactus mandragona, from Southern Argentian


Epithelanthas, Button cactus
dfrost7

Social climber
Jul 17, 2009 - 01:37pm PT
I recognize some of the varieties (probably less exotic) from my grandma's collections. She didn't call them a collection, she just loved them and made tons of pots of little "cactus gardens". She saved coffee cans and about anything handy to make them - they were all over her house, inside and out (South Los Angeles). She would have my sister and me for a week every summer. We would make a couple to take home. We saw her often so these little babies bring back great memories. She was originally from Iowa. I would see the same fascination for cactus when people come from colder climates or places not known for cactus. Do you like the cactus garden at the Fullerton Arboretum?
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 17, 2009 - 01:40pm PT
Anyone have shots from the Bancroft Garden?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 17, 2009 - 11:08pm PT
Lotusland is a national treasure

But The Huntington has the worlds best public cacit and succulent collection
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2009 - 12:12pm PT
Turbinicarpus valdenaus
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2009 - 12:05am PT
A couple more fun plants
My Fav, that just died, I was heartbroken, but have saved some cutting, which will look like this in about 6 years
Mammillaria luethyi

Gibbeaum albun, another fav

Conophytum burgerii, like a glob of jelly


More Monilarias, or gummi worms
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2009 - 12:14am PT
One of my other hobbies, rock and gem collecting
I specialize in natural gem crystals, never cut or polished, most are bought from gem shows, but I of course have a huge collection of stuff I found

This is my entry into the OC Fair in 2005, which won best of show for all collections. Miniature gem crystals


My main collection shelves, from 2005



Metals and meteorites


By the way, my interests span all natural history, evolution and geology. I'm trying to avoid getting into fossils, I don't need to get into another hobby that I will go way to far with.
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
Jul 19, 2009 - 01:49am PT
"I don't need to get into another hobby that I will go way to far with."

That's rich, dude! You're way gone on two already as far as I can tell! That's a nice collection of 'rocks'!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2009 - 12:27pm PT
Shameless bump

Avonia quinaria

Sulcorebutia verticillacantha v. aureiflora
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jul 19, 2009 - 01:46pm PT
Dr. F:

Check out this thread:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=355442&tn=40

It seems you have modeled your life after mine.... but of course on a much grander scale.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2009 - 02:16pm PT
or vica versa
I am older you know

But a great collection there say
And better photo quality,

I was just experimenting with my camera then, and should do a reshoot

But I had no idea you were into rocks as well

We now sell rocks and gravel, along with Cacitsus
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jul 19, 2009 - 02:32pm PT
hahaha! True dat!

Great rocks and gems! I've only found like a handful of mine. Mostly from the Mineral Show in Quartzite, odd shops on my travels, and that cool place in Monrovia... what is the name of that again???


the "it just came to me edit": Burminco is the shop in Monrovia. That and the now defunct (?) Greigers in Pasadena.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2009 - 03:13pm PT
I used to go to all the rock shows, the best local one is in May and Nov. here at the Holiday Inn in Costa Mesa. The Tuscon show is just too big and overwhelming.
I have toned down my rock buying now that I have cacits to spend more time with, its kind of like growing your own crystals.
But me and my wife's collection is completely overwhelming for most people, and most people can't take it all in in one showing.

Here's a couple more shots.
Top shelf specimens, my Fav's

The entire rack of the top rated collection

Quartz only case

Top quartz specimens

Color case, Yellow/orange, purple, green out together by my wife

Calcite

Fluorite and more green crystals

Jar collection, mostly opals and gem sands

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jul 19, 2009 - 04:54pm PT
Very nice! You Rock!!!111666
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 20, 2009 - 02:45pm PT
Russ, of course we were not patterning each other, we just appreciate the natural beauty of these things, and collecting them is a awesome hobby and obession.

More people could do well to do the same.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 20, 2009 - 02:54pm PT
Everyone, don't forget to come to our show and sale at the UC Fullerton Arb this weekend 7/24-26/09, 10-4pm each day
Get there early to get the best stuff, there will be over 20 plant and pot vendors.

The Arb. is located just west of the 57 freeway on Yorba Linda Blvd. Entrance is free, look for Denise (Mrs.Dr F or me) and tell us you are a climber

From last years show, Vince Basta's crested Ariocarpus retusus, very rare, could you imagine seeing this in the wild, some people from the past would think its a monster coming out the earth to eat you.


My grafted Discocactus horstii, blooms at night for 1 night, very fragrant

Russ, if you come by, I will bring some special stuff
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 20, 2009 - 05:35pm PT
Curious selfsevering bump
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 21, 2009 - 12:02pm PT
Adromischus herrei varieties

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 23, 2009 - 06:47pm PT
Don't forget about the OCCSS sale and show this weekend at the UC Fullerton Arboretum.

Various Aloe hybrids



Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jul 25, 2009 - 02:06pm PT
inspired by the Adams/O'Keeffe exhibition at the SFMOMA


Notocactus turecekianus (syn. Parodia turecekiana )
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:10pm PT
I didn't see any climbers at the show, maybe everybody was up in Mammoth for the JB memorial
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:10pm PT
bump for new page
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:10pm PT
3 more
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:11pm PT
this isn't very much fun
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:12pm PT
News flash, Obama is a citizen of America
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:12pm PT
Its spelled cactuses
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 06:14pm PT
The show was great
Met Pier Marsh, she sells pottery that she makes, Randy Marsh's wife
I forgot to load the photos in photo bucket, so I will do that now

Edit, its taking too long to upload, will do later at home, sorry
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2009 - 07:16pm PT
Puna bonnieae, rare in flower

w/ buds

Psuedolithos, being pollinated by flies

Our plants from the show, Haworthia hybrid, look closely to see that the leaves are translucent

Varigated Haworthia

My wife's crested Mammillaria elongata
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 30, 2009 - 04:28pm PT
Since I got so many photos already on this site, and don't know where to post these, but thought it would be fun to share

Real Mt. Biking, no stinking trails needed


Photos by Bill Freeman
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Jul 30, 2009 - 04:48pm PT

exceptional batch Dr. F....
Thanks!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 30, 2009 - 04:51pm PT
And how many times will I have to say something about psycoactive plants
we do not grow them and would never recommend eating anything we grow, since we use to many poisonous chemicals on them, and maybe toxic to eat, they are toxic to bugs



Given your posts in another famous thread, it's not an illogical assumption
Rokrover

Trad climber
SB, CA
Jul 30, 2009 - 05:05pm PT
Did someone mention Dudleya a while back? I believe this is the rare Santa Monica variety that once closed the usual climbers'shortcut to Echo Cliffs. These tough critters hang on in the most inhospitable places with nary a trace of topsoil.
Location: Santa Monica Backbone, below Pico Raquelita
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 30, 2009 - 05:25pm PT
There are two species in the photo
The big one is common, Dudleya pulvirlata sp?

I'm not sure of the small one, I have a book a home that could give a ID

Here is another rack of beauties
4 Diff. Matucana's, from Peru




Lobivia hybrid

Mammillaria guez...
L

climber
Somewhere under the Milky Way tonight...
Jul 30, 2009 - 05:42pm PT
Beautiful photos of some incredible plants, Dr. F!




BTW...what the heck is a Cacit? ;-)
Lynne Leichtfuss

Social climber
valley center, ca
Aug 3, 2009 - 11:51pm PT
Dr F, hope you don't mind if I drift a little.....



The colors get even better and reminded me of your gorgeous cacti flowers.



Cholla in front by mesquite bush along with some new desert art in Anza Borrego.




Mine are not pristine and perfect like yo's Dr. F, but I planted them years ago and I love them. :D

















the Grand Canyon is always super cool with plants and the God earth .....Moran's outlook, I think. :D




Peace and Hope, lynnie







bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
Aug 4, 2009 - 01:52am PT
Not bad, Lynne, Jtree sunsets never fail to impress!
Lynne Leichtfuss

Social climber
valley center, ca
Aug 4, 2009 - 01:54am PT
Hi Bluey, is it too soon to think of Thanksgiving at the Tree. Sheee, I sure had fun with you and your possee last year !!!!!!
Stephen McCabe

Trad climber
near Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 4, 2009 - 02:51am PT
Great photos again, as usual. I especially like getting to see the photos of the Puna in flower, the Pseudolithos and the last Matucana.
Stephen McCabe

Trad climber
near Santa Cruz, CA
Aug 4, 2009 - 03:22am PT
The larger of the dudleyas is D. pulverulenta. The smaller is one of the D. cymosa subspecies. The key at http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/tjm2/review/treatments/crassulaceae-gp-mccabe.html
is the most current, if I do say so myself and the books aren't that accurate any more. There are several rare species in the Santa Monica mountains. It is a hotbed of Dudleyas. In the last couple of months teenagers writing their names in mosses have had a severe impact on one population of nearly deciduous dudleyas and that may impact access to a non-climbing area.

The flowers are beautiful in the spring and can be seen from far away. Some, like D. cymosa marcescens are very hard to see in the driest times of the year and care should be taken not to disturb mosses in the Santa Monica Mountains. In summer and fall, some people don't even see them when they are stepping on them. Some climbing areas in the Santa Monicas go through some exceptionally rare habitats, so please watch out for the succulents, including on rappel and to help preserve climbing access, stick to bare rock, rather than moss covered rocks. If a Dudleya falls off, stick it back in a crack in the rocks. It may survive.
Thank you folks.
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
Aug 4, 2009 - 11:30am PT
Lynne, we'll be down there again for T-day (week). And of course you're welcome to camp with us. I need to get in more climbing on this trip....
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2009 - 10:05pm PT
Astrophytum capricorne

Astrophytum myriostigma v. nudum flowering frenzy

Mammillaria crucigera

Coryphantha calipensis, an extra wooly one

Blossfeldia, one of the rarest in cultivation, these grow like a lichen in between craks in the rock, Argentina
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 8, 2009 - 11:20pm PT
This weekends flowers, for those nature lovers
Copiapoa lauii

2 Echinopsis hybrids

Mammillaria hernandezii

Lithops ruschii, early flowerer


Very sweet specimen of Dinteranthus microspermus V. pub., white/pink flowered form
the flowers turn pink after a couple days

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Aug 9, 2009 - 12:11am PT
^^^^^^

Muy Bueno!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 14, 2009 - 12:33pm PT
The Worlds Biggest and Best Cactus and Succulent Show is this weekend at the LA Arboretum, Pasadena
Check it Out

Me and my wife have entered 22 plants, one is a Copiapoa collection of 10 plants, which I hoping it akes it to the Trophy Table, for the Collection Division trophy

Also have Haworthia truncata that could win a trophy,
and the below plant as a Minature, Discocactus horstii


This is a different Haworthia with shiny windows

Conophytum concavum, starting to grow out of last years dryed skin

Conophytum praesectum
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 14, 2009 - 11:01pm PT
bump
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 14, 2009 - 11:01pm PT
bump
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 14, 2009 - 11:16pm PT
Just a reminder about the Big Cactus show and sale at the LA ARB in Pasadena this weekend, 8/15-16/09
I posted some of these before, but these are some of the plants I entered in the show today, along with the ones posted at 198, hope to win a trophy or two


Haworthia truncata

This Dinterantus microspermus, is flowering, which is a huge advantage to sway the judges, possible trophy for best Mesemb

This Matucana madsonoruim also has buds that will open tomorrow, this picture was from a month ago,

Turbinicarpus minimus, bigger than the usual, may win division, but no trophy

Escobaria minima

Denise's Ortegocactus macdougalii

Mammillaria pectinata

This Dinterantus pole-evansii, in a new pot, and not flowering now, it just looks like a plastic golf ball

Heres a couple from the Copiapoa collection



too much?

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Aug 14, 2009 - 11:33pm PT
That Arboretum show is great! I've gone there a few times. My old stomping grounds.
Grasshoppa

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Aug 24, 2009 - 10:02pm PT
I was trying to figure out what our cactus was and thanks to this post, I think it's an Echinopsis Hammerschmidii. :-)

Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Aug 31, 2009 - 11:33pm PT
From the last month up to a few days ago:














Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Dec 4, 2009 - 01:36pm PT
Bouse, Arizona area:









I used a kite to hoist the camera.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Dec 21, 2009 - 12:39pm PT


Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Apr 10, 2013 - 05:32pm PT
Bump. It's that time of year. My indoor stuff has been going off for a couple months, and the outdoor stuff in JT is starting to pop too. Beavertails are in bloom, silver torch have been blooming for a month and the others are getting ready.

The stuff up Rattlesnake canyon was a little further along, with some of the engleman's hedgehogs and claret cups already blooming.
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2013 - 08:00pm PT

There are flowers on some plant every day of the year in my garden
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Apr 10, 2013 - 08:46pm PT
Bump

Great to see this wonderful Thread back!
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2013 - 10:42pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Apr 10, 2013 - 10:50pm PT
F, the simple beauty of those plants is astounding.
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Apr 10, 2013 - 10:55pm PT
Awesome Dr. F. thanks for sharing your passion, fantastic!!!
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Apr 11, 2013 - 11:35am PT
That M. pectinata is sweet, and I love the Ortego mac.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Apr 21, 2013 - 07:38pm PT
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Engleman's Hedgehog
Engleman's Hedgehog
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Credit: Elcapinyoazz
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 21, 2013 - 10:40pm PT
That's some sweet action Elcap

Last week's flowers
front side
front side
Credit: Dr. F.
back side
back side
Credit: Dr. F.

still processing this week's flowers
vicarious1

Social climber
Vancouver,BC, Canada
Apr 29, 2013 - 10:36pm PT
Hello we just bought a "living stone" cactee and a Venus Fly trap a first :-). So we started research online and came across your amazing photos. Allow me to share photos I took at Huntington gardens in Pasadena greater Los Angeles next to the Arboretum
http://visualsenses.smugmug.com/Nature-in-its-many-splendors/Designed-Parks-and-Gardens/Huntington-Gardens-San-Marino/7050306_6NTksM#!i=451683720&k=f8fcfdP
and my photo of South Africa Johannesburg Botanical gardens
http://visualsenses.smugmug.com/Travel-Tourism-Countries/Goregous-South-Africa/Johannesburg-Botanical-Garden/7532666_FHpTNq#!i=486117711&k=fRGGpVr
Bye4now

Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
May 22, 2013 - 09:26pm PT
Credit: Elcapinyoazz

Credit: Elcapinyoazz

Credit: Elcapinyoazz

Credit: Elcapinyoazz

Credit: Elcapinyoazz

Credit: Elcapinyoazz
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