The GREAT TREE Thread ! !

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Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Nov 13, 2017 - 07:56am PT
This tree has been hard put. Its brethren were burned and put to the saw. This guy has survived fire, drought, chain saw and bark beetle.

Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Nov 20, 2017 - 07:31am PT
Interior Live Oak


Easily the biggest circumference oak I've ever seen in California. There is no scale in this photo but at it's widest I think 15 feet in diameter. Not a super tall tree but super big and old for an oak.


Just one of its branches would be a great tree all by itself


DMT
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Nov 20, 2017 - 09:41am PT
Credit: Charlie D.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Nov 22, 2017 - 08:17pm PT
Credit: hooblie
Credit: hooblie
Credit: hooblie
Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Nov 23, 2017 - 08:06am PT


DMT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 24, 2017 - 05:06am PT
Credit: mouse from merced
Same tree, lower down.
Credit: mouse from merced
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 24, 2017 - 05:42am PT
Dingus, the old oak tree you found recalls one I saw in Jerseydale, Mariposa County. It overlooks the Merced's South Fork upstream from Hites Cove.

I cannot say if it is bigger, but it's in the same league. There are a number of NA grinding holes located in the granite nearby. A creek runs through the area, draining the meadow in Jerseydale where the old Double Eagle 9-hole golf course was located; now abandoned, the clubhouse still stands as a monument to folly and disrespect for nature.

No pics and the last time I viewed the tree and its cousins was almost 20 years ago.

This also jogged my memory about the famous Hooker Oak which stood in Chico, named for Sir Joseph Hooker, the English scientist. It was said to be the largest in the world by Sir Joseph and the tradition was carried on until it fell (1977).

Personnel at both Cal Oak and University of California Berkeley Forestry Lab became intrigued with the lumber. The wood turned out to be as remarkable as was the tree. In order to support its immense crown, the tree grew an abnormal portion of support wood on the upper side of its limbs and stems. This type wood is known as "tension wood" and helped provide the tree with an unbelievable high density: .88 specific gravity, roughly 50% heavier than surrounding oaks. This together with other special characteristics, provided the wood with its unique grain and character, and the tree, apparently with its longevity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooker_Oak
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Nov 24, 2017 - 06:06am PT
Nice. Some. Cool old oaks.
One tree I miss from living down south.

That factoid about the "tension wood" is interesting. I've befriended a tree geneticist. He's pretty interesting to talk to. Some of these adaptions are likely genetic and may give one tree a leg up when it come to outliving their neighbors by a few centuries(or millennia in the case of the Bristlecones)

Speaking of Bristlecones ... all I got on the I pad of course
Patriarch Grove
Credit: justthemaid

This tree here is so old the original trunk has been completely blasted away by wind-blown ice and the rock has eroded away under the roots. Trees like this cannot be dated since the original pith is long gone. Tree ring data is worthless on a tree like this.
It grows so slowly it only throws down one cell thickness a year... if it even bothers to wake up for the summer.

Credit: justthemaid
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 24, 2017 - 09:04am PT
Live oak in Da Hood...

Credit: Reilly
Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Nov 24, 2017 - 09:05am PT


DMT
Gnome Ofthe Diabase

climber
Out Of Bed
Nov 24, 2017 - 05:40pm PT
Credit: Gnome Ofthe Diabase
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Nov 24, 2017 - 06:23pm PT
several nice images of surface murk today dingus. me & my nostrils
Credit: hooblie
well, we miss that stuff. no dewey peach fuzz around here lately
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Nov 29, 2017 - 06:20pm PT
Credit: hooblie
Credit: hooblie
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Nov 29, 2017 - 07:04pm PT
Credit: guido
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Dec 5, 2017 - 08:41am PT
Credit: hooblie
Credit: hooblie
Credit: hooblie
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Dec 11, 2017 - 05:48am PT
The oldest apple tree in Washington. That's what the arborist who cares for it says.



Makes sense, because it's growing next to the oldest residential building still standing in WA.



Ferry House, 1860, Whidbey Island.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Jan 1, 2018 - 05:53pm PT
Credit: hooblie
Credit: hooblie
Contractor

Boulder climber
CA
Jan 13, 2018 - 12:47pm PT
Torrey Pine- Coronado CA
Torrey Pine- Coronado CA
Credit: Contractor
Credit: Contractor
The Torrey Pine is one of the rarest pine trees in the world. A few wild groves exist in Northern, Coastal San Diego and a varient grows on Santa Rosa Island. These populations are tiny vestiges of larger forests thriving during the last ice age. The tree produces a pine nut that the coastal Kumeyaay Indians enjoyed. They are a medium to large pine tree that gets quite massive when irrigated (up to 140 feet).

If you visit San Diego, don't miss Torrey Pines State Park!
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Jan 13, 2018 - 02:56pm PT
Credit: hooblie
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Jan 19, 2018 - 10:19am PT
Credit: hooblie
been bumpin' around the JP for a while now and size wise,
Credit: hooblie
either my hat shrunk (hanging there) or this is one swole shaggy bark

Credit: hooblie
that's the monster juniper, center frame
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