Tahquitz: The Early Years Rick Ridgeway Summit 1976

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Brunosafari

Boulder climber
Redmond, OR
Jan 11, 2009 - 12:13am PT
I proposed to my wife of thirty years, on Lunch Ledge, while doing Angel's Fright. My own pun--it scared her good, and rightly so!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 11, 2009 - 12:17pm PT
So, which one of you is the angel ......or is it a match made in heaven? ----Dos Angeles!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2009 - 11:59pm PT
Another classic early Tahquitz article from Summit October 1960.









Brunosafari

Boulder climber
Redmond, OR
Jan 30, 2009 - 12:12am PT
only now just spotted this Steve--only kind of angel I am is the fallen sort, but nice Dos Angeles pun--you been talkin' to Bob Brinton?

$.35!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 30, 2009 - 12:34am PT
Summits were cheaper back then....LOL
BBA

Social climber
West Linn OR
Jan 30, 2009 - 01:50pm PT
Looking at those articles, I pulled out my 1956 "climber's guide to tahquitz rock" by Chuck Wilts and Don Wilson and was doing some reminiscing. I'd climbed Jensen's Jaunt in 1959 and noticed Jensens first name in the Summit Aritcle was Carl. What a coincidence as in the Register for Mt. Starr King the name Carl P. Jensen appears as ascending on August 22, 1937 along with my grandfather, William Kat, who was up there for his fifth time. Next to Jensen's name are the initials SCRCS, obviously Southern California Rock Climbing Section. I'd never made that connection before.
LongAgo

Trad climber
Jan 30, 2009 - 07:39pm PT
Thank you Steve. Interesting how looking back tells the same story about the game as best modern tales and histories of climbing areas: the pleasure of the rock, the achievement of getting up hard bits with the technology and garb of the day, acknowledgement of the cast of clambering characters, all with some wry takes and maybe corny humor, but mixed with praise and wonder for the gift of great stone -- the requisite formula for climbing joy on the day and thereafter.

I dug out my old Summits in a wistful moment and enjoyed a few at lunch today, thanks to you.

Tom Higgins
LongAgo
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2009 - 12:18am PT
Pretty elemental little game really! And we all have so much fun playing at it.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 2, 2009 - 10:53am PT
Fun with scoops and bumps....

Incidentally- what is your most memorable Tahquitz route or outing, Tom?
LongAgo

Trad climber
Feb 2, 2009 - 07:11pm PT
Steve,

I suppose the most memorable was the first free ascent of the Blanketty Blank because I was very young and impressionable at the time and just learning about climbing from mostly Stoney Point days, with only few 5.9 leads under my belt at Tahquitz. Bob Kamps was my most admired mentor and we were starting to do more than boulder at Stoney and one day at Tahquitz, he said, let's try this free. I knew nothing of the route or probable difficulty, and with much anxiety and desire to do well with Bob, off we went. I remember the beautiful rock and funny old shoes we wore, and the image of Bob already a little weathered and with very short hair, maybe close to military style. He fiddled with the crux on the first pitch trying to protect a move by putting a thin pin under a flake, but the flake popped off. I thought we were done since the next section looked hard and would entail a nasty fall without any protection. But we did have a bolt kit along and he gave me enough slack to get it up to him and he put a bolt in, fell once and then got it.

Following, I was wondering, what the heck if Bob fell what was I going to do? Turned out the move was like a little mantle on Rock 2 at Stoney and up I came to his squinty look and smile and in another moment he said something like, "It's supposed to be hard." It was a fleeting moment but the beginning of a lifelong friendship and many, many wonderful days climbing together, bantering along the way. Of course, I had my share of falls with him and visa versa, at Tahquitz and elsewhere. He held a 50 footer of mine on El Camino Real not too far from the very route we did that day, saving my life as I came to rest bug eyed looking right at him, hanging horizontal, a foot or so above a ledge.

I think the other big memory from Tahquitz was leading the last pitch of Jonah without a key protection bolt because, well, dumb and young, I didn't have a back up plan for what to do when ye old Rawl Drive drills broke (and boy did they ever in early days). I did go back, climb the whole thing again and put a bolt in to make it safe, that time with lots of back up drill stuff. I remember thinking I didn’t like the feel of doing the route again to fix it and started to learn the difference between a fresh creation and a “project.” At any rate, Jonah is a good enough climb and all, but the lesson was there for me – how great if all comes together first time.

Tom Higgins
LongAgo
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 2, 2009 - 10:46pm PT
Thanks for the reply. Amazing how brightly those early adventures shine! Trying to drink from the well of inspiration without falling in and drowning!

When I came back to Tahquitz as a solid face climber, Jonah was the first route that I went after. The perfect onsight is just right but thanks for being thorough and returning to properly bolt such a classic route. I imagined the toeing in of welted boots as I made my on by. Great effort.
DonC

climber
CA
Feb 2, 2009 - 11:44pm PT

Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Feb 3, 2009 - 09:05am PT
I have always wanted to climb at Tahquitz and Suicide and I hope to someday. I remember seeing a photo (I think in Summit but it could have been in Mountain) of Tobin Sorenson leading a sweet looking climb, can't think of the name and I think it was rated around 5.10c.

Bart Fay

Pimm's (wouldn't be a bad name for a climb)

When I was a cocktail barman in London, I use to make Pimm's all the time, it is very popular in England.


Recipe for a Pimm's No.1, from my International Guide To Drinks, compiled by the United Kingdom Bartenders Guild:

Pimm's No.1
The original and best known of the cups marketed as Pimm's has a gin base. Prepare by pouring the Pimm's into an ice-filled highball glass then topping with lemonade, ginger ale or 7-Up. Decorate with slice of lemon or orange and rind of cucumber or mint.


From Wikipedia

Pimm's Cup is a popular cocktail in England. It is based on Pimm's No.1, a gin-based beverage flavored with fruits and spices invented in 1823 as a health drink.


Pimm's is a brand of alcoholic beverages now owned by Diageo. Its most popular product is Pimm's No. 1 Cup, a gin-based beverage that can be served both on ice or in cocktails. It has a dark tea colour with a reddish tint, and tastes subtly of spice and citrus fruit.

Pimm's is most common in Britain, particularly Southern England. It is one of the two staple drinks at Wimbledon, the Henley Royal Regatta and the Glyndebourne opera festival, the other being Champagne. There are five other Pimm's products besides No.1. The essential difference among them is the base alcohol used to produce them:

* Pimm's No. 1 Cup is based on gin. It is 25% alcohol by volume.
* Pimm's No. 2 Cup was based on whisky. Currently phased out.
* Pimm's No. 3 Cup is based on brandy. Phased out, but a version infused with spices and orange peel marketed as Pimm's Winter Cup is now seasonally available.
* Pimm's No. 4 Cup was based on rum. Currently phased out.
* Pimm's No. 5 Cup was based on rye. Currently phased out.
* Pimm's No. 6 Cup is based on vodka. It is still produced, but in small quantities.

Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Feb 3, 2009 - 10:32am PT
Tom Higgins, thanks for such a nice little summary of what we do and why we like it:

Interesting how looking back tells the same story about the game as best modern tales...
Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Feb 3, 2009 - 10:43am PT
So interesting to see Chuck Wilts warning about grading climbs from early 1971:


"It is difficult to get an accurate measure of this since individual ratings of a given climb often differ by as much as one decimal point."


A good expression of the developing anguish over ratings, penned when the YDS (which really was the Tahquitz Decimal System) was still an unruly teenager, and Bridwell had not quite published "The Innocent, the Ignorant and the Insecure," introducing the beginning of letter grades.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2009 - 11:25am PT
I have Leigh Ortenberger's 63 article proposing the NCCS national comparative ratings system but I haven't posted it yet. Life before numbers......
JuanDeFuca

Big Wall climber
Stoney Point
Feb 4, 2009 - 06:44pm PT
bumpit
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 5, 2009 - 10:32am PT
Thanks for the exposition on Pimm's, Patrick! Can't say as I have tried it but it surely will cross my mind on my next parched day at Tahquitz.
wild willy

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 9, 2009 - 05:30pm PT
About Pims cups - The Chart House always served it with a cold section of cucumber. I think that is the authentic way to serve it. If you do order one DON'T accept it if it comes with a wilted celery stick or other sub. A cold cucumber is the only way to go.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 10, 2009 - 11:05pm PT
Here are eight recipes for Pimm's #1 gin. They look tasty!

Luxury recipe

1 1/3 oz gin
2/3 oz Bols® creme de bananes
2/3 oz rosso vermouth
2/3 oz Pimm's® gin
2/3 oz Rose's® lime juice
1 dash Angostura® bitters


Shake, strain into a cocktail glass, and serve.


24% (48 proof)
Serve in: Cocktail Glass
Mandarine Summertime recipe

2 cl Mandarine Napoleon® orange liqueur
2 cl dry gin
orange juice
1 dash grenadine syrup


Pour mandarine napoleon and gin into a highball glass and fill with orange juice. Add a touch of grenadine, two cubes of ice and garnish with a slice of lemon.


Serve in: Highball Glass


North Mymms Mirage recipe

2 shots Pimm's® gin
1/4 pint blackcurrant squash
2 shots gin
1/2 pint lemonade


Mix the blackcurrant and the lemonade together. Add the gin and pimms together stirring well but do not shake. Garnish with fruit pieces. Mix a batch and serve liberally.


8% (16 proof)
Serve in: Red Wine Glass
Pimm's Cup recipe

1 shot Pimm's® gin
7-Up® soda
1 slice cucumber
1 twist lemon peel


Pour pimm's no.1 into a highball glass. Add a twist of lemon and fill with 7-up. Garnish with a slice of cucumber.


Serve in: Highball Glass


Pimm's No. 1 recipe

1 1/4 - 1 3/4 oz Pimm's® gin
5 oz 7-Up® soda
1 twist lemon peel
1 twist cucumber peel


Pour Pimm's over ice cubes in a large highball glass. Fill with 7-up, add twists of lemon and cucumber peel, and serve.


Serve in: Highball Glass
Pimm's Rangoon recipe

1 1/2 oz Pimm's® gin
ginger ale
lemon peel
1 cucumber


Pour pimm's no.1 over ice in a large highball glass. Fill with ginger ale and garnish with a lemon and cucumber peel.


Serve in: Highball Glass


Pimm's Turbo recipe

1 oz Pimm's® gin
1 oz gin
4 oz lemonade


Pour into an ice-filled wine goblet. Garnish with a slice of lemon and a cherry.


10% (20 proof)
Serve in: Wine Goblet
Wimbledon Cup recipe

1 oz Pimm's® gin
1 oz gin
1/2 oz strawberry syrup
1 oz mandarin juice
1 oz double cream


Shake, strain into a champagne saucer, and serve.


14% (28 proof)
Serve in: Champagne Saucer



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