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Messages 1 - 20 of total 34 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
WBraun

climber
May 2, 2005 - 06:40pm PT
Oh I have to say .........so sorry all mushrooms no good. They grow in dark dank places, bad karma. Big ugly mold.
waterchossguy

Trad climber
brk
May 2, 2005 - 06:41pm PT
Top mushroom could be Amanita magniverrucata


"edibility :unknown -do not experiment !it belongs to the lepidellas a sub group of AMANITA that contain both poisonous and harmless species"

2nd mushroom looks to be either on older dried up version of the above or an Amanita sp. which again is one you do not want to experament with ..as u might or might not know Death Caps mushrooms (amanita phalloides) are also in the same family and are considered very deadly.


could you please take some photos of the underside of the bottom mushroom and if you would could you slice it open in the center and take a photo and post it ,i will do my best to tell you what that one is ..oh yeah please take photos of the underside of the first two so i can make sure i have the right identification ..thanks..

bob

Okay i might be wrong about the top one ..You need to post a photo of the underside . It could be a calvatia sculpta (the sierran puffball)which are edible when they are immature ,

Blinny

Trad climber
NorthWestMontana
May 2, 2005 - 07:50pm PT
Eric,

The Miwok in Yosemite Valley had a tried and true method of telling whether a mushroom was edible or not; if it was "hollum malla mazhoy" or "maggoty and full of worms" it was safe to eat! They figured if the maggots and worms could handle eating the 'shroom, it probably wouldn't kill a human being.

My apologies to the Miwok for completely bastardizing the spelling of that statement.

I credit the great Mather District Naturalist, Bob Roney, for that tasty morsel of Miwok/mushroom history. He was my mentor when I was an Interpreter in the Valley, back in the day.

Kath
MissesBlinny
http://blanchardguitars.com/

P.S. I will add, that my all time favorite college prof insisted that the ONLY mushroom he'd eat would have to come from SAFEWAY! And he was a brilliant botanist!
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Oakville, Ontario, Canada, eh?
May 2, 2005 - 07:58pm PT
I remember reading in 2003 or so about this wild mushroom expert from Michigan who ate a new delicacy, and ended up dead. He thought he was sure....

Perhaps you should feed one to your climbing partner first. [Oh right, you're a soloist] Sorry.

Why not soak it in Olde E.? That might kill anything nasty.....
addiroid

Big Wall climber
Long Beach, CA
May 2, 2005 - 08:25pm PT
Funny a drug post would appear on a climbing forum...

So I was playing Scattegories with some friends of mine. You have to name 10 things under the category listed. So she goes, "Paul, you're a climber, you should get this!!" The category was "Illegal Drugs" GO!! Ok, so I got all 10 and even got all of the ones in parentheses that are alternate names for the ones listed (about 14 total). This was about all in 15 seconds without really even pausing to think about it.

And to think that I have never done ANY drugs and still got this right!!

Shack

Trad climber
So. Cal.
May 2, 2005 - 08:39pm PT
I like the ruler in the photo.
Makes em more like crime scene photos.

They don't look like any "good" ones I've ever had.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 2, 2005 - 08:42pm PT
I remember when I first moved here my thesis advisor's wife was doing a rotation in the UCSF organ transplant ward during her internship. FWIW, she was really busy during that rotation b/c it was poison mushroom season in Marin. Eat them, and your only hope is a liver transpant asap. They tended to do a few emergency liver transplant for this reason each year. I guess you have dibs on Tuolumne*rainbow's, so you should time your mushroom feast to coincide with her ascent of the Punch Bowl.
zardoz

Trad climber
Wheat Ridge
May 2, 2005 - 08:50pm PT
Mushroom hunting is a very popular pastime in the Czech Republic, so my wife enlisted me in a romp or two. It's great fun. We seek the many varieties of the boletus species. Here is a coveted one with the red head:



These mushrooms tend to grow in the midst of aspen groves. You can find them in Colorado in the late summer. The gills are spongey and yellow, rather than ribbed. We still have a huge jar of dried ones we collected last summer. Damn tastey. These mushrooms get pretty big, too. Look at this specimin!


TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 04:00am PT
Seek out a mycological organization near you. They can teach you enough to be safe. There are also some standard books available on amazon (example Mushrooms Demystified, ... by David Arora), but it would still be advisable to find an organization to help you get started. Reading this will probably get you to seek out some live experts.

Avoid advice like some of what you see above. For example, boletes do not have gills, they have pores. I have not seen or heard advice about maggots or worms before. Certainly there are edible species that "worms", insects, or slugs will be eating.
Laetiporus sulfureus (chicken mushroom) seems almost always to have other critters dining before you do. But I would be very wary of the converse of that statement. Omphalotus illudens (Jack O'Lantern mushroom) might look similar to the Laetiporus to an untrained eye and is deadly poisonous. The two are very easy to distinguish.

Most mushrooms should not be eaten uncooked. I have heard an expert say that none should be eaten raw. Some do not mix with alcohol.

The best rule is "Do not eat a mushroom unless you can identify it." You might miss a few edible ones, or ones in which edibility is unknown. But you really do not want to roll the dice (probability mentioned in earlier post) on edibility. There are some which will only cause mild to severe gastric distress. Others for which that may appear to be a temporary symptom, prior to liver failure.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
May 3, 2005 - 07:32am PT
best rule is "Do not eat a mushroom unless you can identify it."
it sounds like a special case rule that I had when eating in diners around Brookhaven National Laboratory taking shifts on experiments: don't eat anything you cann't positively identify... generally sound advice.
Jonny D

Social climber
Lost Angelez, Kalifornia
May 3, 2005 - 09:23am PT
Hey Zardoz,

Those photos are making me drool... nice specimens of Boletus (aka Porcinis, aka Ceps). On a good year I use to pick'em up by the bucket loads in Santa Fe when I use to live there. Coming from a country of shroom pickers, I get the jones when the late summer rains hits in the mountains.
dirtbag

climber
May 3, 2005 - 09:43am PT
There are old mushroom pickers, and there are careless mushroom pickers, but there is no such thing as an old careless mushroom picker.
dmitry

Trad climber
Chita, Russia
May 3, 2005 - 10:03am PT
hey, klaus

I ate a lot of wild mushrooms growing up in Siberia.
None of the mushrooms that you found look edible.

In the US, I've found only a couple of varieties identical to the ones I'm accustomed to. I'm still alive.

dmitry
TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 10:07am PT
Picking is perfectly safe. But you probably know that. You can smell and probably even taste (spit afterward) (Not recommending tasting here. And not mycologist myself). Ingesting is what can be dangerous.
waterchossguy

Trad climber
brk
May 3, 2005 - 10:16am PT
hey dmitry,

The top shroom could be edible, its most likley is a calvatia sculpta (the sierran puffball)
http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Calvatia_sculpta.html

I wouldnt eat it unless i could look at it up close cut it open smell it identify the location where it was found and compare it with the info in the bible of mushroom books
dmitry

Trad climber
Chita, Russia
May 3, 2005 - 11:39am PT
that's cool; i just know that i am alive for the lack of experimenting: i only eat those mushrooms i know from my childhood days (based indeed on the smell, the way the skin peels off from the top, the underside appearance etc.)
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 3, 2005 - 12:11pm PT
LOL...I'm pretty handy in the lab, and I know that I screw up a fair number of my experiments and don't always realize it until later. I always wondered why more people didn't drop dead from botched homemade drugs.

The same boss that had the wife working in liver transplant had a classmate get booted from his grad program for making acid. This guy would only sell to other chemists and he would provide his raw QC data with his product.

T*R...not wishing you any bad luck. Sorry for the gallows humor regarding klaus having two reasons to need a new liver in the same day.
TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 12:22pm PT
"I always wondered why more people didn't drop dead from botched homemade drugs. ..."

Maybe they do. But the manufacturers probably do not see the need to report this to the FDA. They might make them take their products off the market. That kills income, ask Merck. :-)

I guess if there were any "magic berries", we might have a parallel thread on eating wild berries. Oops, is that another liver opening?
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
May 3, 2005 - 12:31pm PT
"I always wondered why more people didn't drop dead from botched homemade drugs. ..."

Maybe they do. But the manufacturers probably do not see the need to report this to the FDA. They might make them take their products off the market. That kills income, ask Merck. :-)



Let me rephrase then..."I wonder why I've never known anyone who dropped dead from botched homemade drugs."
TradIsGood

Trad climber
Gunks end of country
May 3, 2005 - 12:58pm PT
Melissa, now I am wondering if you think the sample of people you know is a population particularly likely to have had that problem. Nice on the QC data though. Maybe that is the factor. Population with tendency but knowledgable.
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