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Messages 639 - 658 of total 869 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Jul 18, 2011 - 12:27am PT
Tons of thumbs up for Ivan. I wish he still worked The Fringe caf-ay.
Great guy !!!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 18, 2011 - 01:49am PT
There was also a sasquatch sighting, or maybe it was a troll. Squamish can be a misty, mysterious place, with many secrets.
Credit: Mighty Hiker
gf

climber
Jul 18, 2011 - 11:38am PT
Bruce-You look in good health!
Anders -can you provide info on who put the stamped sign up for the Grand Wall? As I recall one of the signs on an adjoining tree was removed as a slice of wood once it had been felled. As I recall a climber with a name associated with "Fir" had something to do with it.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 18, 2011 - 01:44pm PT
The Mountain Rescue Group did some work on trails at the Chief in the later 1960s - I hope to ferret out the exact date. Possibly working with the Mountain Access Committee, they improved and signed the trail to the bottom of the Grand Wall, the backside trail, and perhaps others. About the same time as the MRG at least started to think about how to do a technical rescue, if needed. I'm fairly sure that the engraved metal signs were made by Paul Binkert, who was quite into trail work, and also very good at working with metal, both in his profession and later as an artist. I know he had the engraving equipment. There are half a dozen such signs around Squamish, and in most cases the tree to which a sign is attached has grown out and to some extent around them. By the 1960s, they'd learnt to not hammer the nails for signs and markers all the way into the tree, to allow some room for growth, and they probably started with a cm or so of 'slack'.

I believe that the original Grand Wall "boat rope" lives in a bucket in the Garibaldi Highlands, together with the plaque for the Errol Pardoe memorial hut. The Squamish museum was given most of the original Grand Wall bongs, made by the town blacksmith at Pat Brennan's request (command), but may have subsequently misplaced them.

Let's not also forget that the weekend's festival, as much as anything, derives from the famous John Howe slide shows. Starting with an annual group slide show in the basement of John's parents' house in North Vancouver, then expanding to rented rooms at UBC, then to the very first climbers' festival in Squamish in 1986 (25th anniversary), and the big 40th anniversary event in 2001. A lot of work for John and friends, especially the big one in 2001. John has also been big figure in Squamish Search & Rescue, and was Squamish's citizen of the year a few years ago for all his efforts. The earlier slide shows were immortalized by a cartoon by Tami.

(The 1986 festival included two parties climbing the Grand Wall, one with equipment and technique similar to that used in 1961, the other by 'modern' means. Comparison. John Wittmayer was a member of the 'trad' team - maybe he can tell us about it.)
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 18, 2011 - 06:34pm PT
So here is Ed Cooper, speaking on Saturday night at the Eagle Eye theatre in Squamish. An entertaining and well-received presentation - he's been doing a lot of work to scan and restore old slides and photos. About half was on climbing (and photography) in B.C. generally, about half about the first ascent of the Grand Wall, and bits on other things like Dihedral Wall. He was introduced by Corinne Lonsdale, who saw the ascent in 1961 as a teenager (she's only 28 now), is a former mayor of Squamish, and now a councillor.
photo not found
Missing photo ID#209750
Ed says they intended a diretissima, in the spirit of Comici. Unlike El Cap, the Grand Wall of the Chief doesn't have any significant weaknesses between University Wall on the far left (done in 1966), and Crap Crags on the far right (1962, a moderate tree wrangle). They ended up using about 135 bolts, although 80% must have been for the bolt ladders connecting the Flake to the base of the Split Pillar, and the top of the Sword to the Flats. In the context of the equipment and techniques that were available then, they did it in fine style, albeit siege techniques were needed. Assuming that you wanted to do a route on the main face, it took the obvious line. Mercy Me wasn't discovered until years later, although it now provides a common indirect approach to the Split Pillar.

Looking at it another way, all the routes later done on the Grand Wall had the use of much better knowledge, equipment and techniques, often started higher up (top of the Flake, top of Peasants' Route) and finished at Dance Platform/Bellygood, and still typically used 40 to 50 drilled holes. Uncle Ben's, Humpty Dumpty, Ten Years After, Up From the Skies, Zorro's, Black Dyke, Negro Lesbian. Part of the history project will be working out how many each had.

The exception, of course, is University Wall, in the big corner on the left edge of the wall. A completely independent line to Dance Platform, and over half independent through the Roman Chimneys. They used something like seven or nine bolts on the FA. Somewhat parallel to the first climbs on El Capitan, where the second route (Salathe) followed a line of weakness, and so used far less bolts than were used on the Nose - although I guess a lot have been added to both routes, especially at belays and the various 'free' ascents.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 18, 2011 - 10:54pm PT
Well, one of the threads leading eventually to climbers' festivals in Squamish was John and his events. Agreed that there's still a need for something like those crazy evenings with the gang, swapping lies and stories, mercilessly heckling each other.

photo not found
Missing photo ID#209835
Rogues' gallery, from Saturday night. L-R, Richard Strachan (Clean Corner, 1962), Ed Cooper, Dick Culbert (a long list, but his first FA at Squamish was in 1958), and Tricouni (again, a very long list, including University Wall in 1966, and the first real guide to Squamish in 1967).
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Jul 19, 2011 - 12:26am PT
The earlier slide shows were immortalized by a cartoon by Tami.

It's in Chic Scott's book Pushing the Limits. Page 600-something or other. I share the page with a fabulous foto of Mr. Fir.

Great rogues gallery Anders> amazing that you can polish up dirtbags.

And yup, Bruce you look fabulous. I"m with Foodeater on thattun.

Now I too wonder if the Squish Fest truely does derive from The John Howe Slide Shows. Having attended most of those and a few of the latest iterations, there is significantly more professionalism and significantly less outtahand crazyness but maybe that's just us showin' our age.

Oh, and btw, the brass in Banff at the festival has changed guard. I'm invited to present this year; that would have NEVER happened with the previous crew. The party this year in Banff will be on 4 Nov at the Irish Pub in Banff :-D Yeeeehaw!!!!!

gf

climber
Jul 19, 2011 - 01:47am PT
Anders,
Great shot of a significant crew! I really should have turned the car around for a second lap up the sound on saturday to catch eds' presentation.
-earlier in the day i was riding with fellow ageing climbers, then late-lunching with more ageing climbers, then strapping on my dad cape to pick my daughter up at the ferry on her return from a week at camp on keats island. Schedules, alas.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jul 20, 2011 - 01:39am PT
Another photo or two, to spin things out.
photo not found
Missing photo ID#209947
Access Society table. No committees were hurt in the taking of this photo.

photo not found
Missing photo ID#209948
About the best weather of the whole weekend.

photo not found
Missing photo ID#209949
Glenn and Ed. Ed with his books - Spirit of the Heights, Spirit of the Rockies, Spirit of Yosemite. All well worth getting - see http://www.edcooper.com

FatTrad to now scramble for post #666, his first to the thread.
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Sep 12, 2011 - 10:41pm PT
Bump!

Anders, this thread is amazing!

More if you please?

Mike

Edit

Tami tell us a tale about the kangaroo!

Kangaroo Corner, Smoke Bluffs, Squamish
Kangaroo Corner, Smoke Bluffs, Squamish
Credit: Big Mike
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Oct 5, 2011 - 03:56am PT
I haven't found any story about the Left Side of the Split Pillar. It's first free ascent was in 1975 by Nick Taylor and Peter Peart. Any stories about those guys? Were they visitors?

RP's and cams were not available back then so it must have been quite the hard climb to protect. How did they do it? Were they aliens from the future?
gf

climber
Oct 5, 2011 - 04:03am PT
I recall a letter to mountain mag commenting on this -mh may have the details
gf
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Oct 6, 2011 - 12:09am PT
Bumping for a Left Side Storey!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Oct 6, 2011 - 12:16am PT
Sorry - missed this one during the FaceLift. Peter Peart immigrated to Canada from Australia in about 1970, with his wife. He was quite active in the mountaineering community during the 1970s, and I knew him fairly well. (I believe he now lives on Bowen Island, and is an engineer. Don't know about his background.) He was sort of a local beachhead for visiting Australians, especially those on their way to or from the Valley. In 1972 Chris Baxter spent some time here, and then in late summer 1975 rising star Nic Taylor showed up. I gather that Peter was his belay slave for a few days, during which they bagged the left side of the Pillar - Eric and Daryl had done the right side earlier that summer.

Nic went on to other climbing feats, and despite some skepticism at the time, it was clear he was quite able to do a climb as hard as the left side. (That was the summer that Mountain breathlessly reported that Hotline had been freed in the Valley, allegedly the first 5.12.) I did A Question of Balance with Peter in 1977, or rather he belayed and I scared myself, and drilled.
gf

climber
Oct 6, 2011 - 01:09am PT
Thanks MH -it would be great to lure Nic or Peter to post up -no doubt those gear-dicking technical routes he had done a ton of at araps stood him in good stead.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Oct 6, 2011 - 01:14am PT
I remember reading a log book in the Pardoe Hut ( when it was there ) that noted the FIRST AUSTRALIAN ASCENT of Grand Wall. Someone had written beneath it "Australians f U c k koala bears and eat kangaroos".



I thought that was funny. But I have an unhealthy sense of humour.


What happened to that logbook after the hut was destroyed/removed???
Todd Eastman

climber
Bellingham, WA
Oct 6, 2011 - 01:15am PT
The Aussies might read that as 999#...
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Oct 6, 2011 - 01:20am PT
I remember reading a log book in the Pardoe Hut ( when it was there ) that noted the FIRST AUSTRALIAN ASCENT of Grand Wall. Someone had written beneath it "Australians f U c k koala bears and eat kangaroos".



I thought that was funny. But I have an unhealthy sense of humour.

BaHAHAHAhaha :)
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Oct 6, 2011 - 01:39am PT
Relic - It could'a possibly have been verse-visa if you know what I mean but I think it easier to F u C k a koala.




But I've never been to Oz.
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Oct 6, 2011 - 03:41am PT
chortle :)









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