Lost Arrow Direct - beta request

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Messages 21 - 40 of total 50 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 21, 2008 - 10:00am PT
Wow, Ed - thanks for the expanded photo. This will be very helpful for describing the rappel route. Very beautiful up there, too!
F10 Climber F11 Drinker

Trad climber
medicated and flat on my back
Jun 21, 2008 - 10:34am PT

k-man,

can you post up a few more photo's
del cross

climber
Bay Area
Jun 23, 2008 - 10:13am PT
Wow, really nice photos K. No more cardboard camera for me.

Ed, that's a fantastic shot as well. I think you had #1 about right the first time. I'm pretty sure it's here:

Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 23, 2008 - 07:51pm PT
nice k-man!
and thanks for looking it over del cross... I updated the photo again...
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 24, 2008 - 09:01pm PT
anyone know what's up with the AAJ search page?

clicking on the link: http://www.americanalpineclub.org/AAJO/

produces the message:




AAJ search is offline for maintenance, please check back soon. Return to previous page.




accessing the AAJ seems possible if you have the exact file name, but I'm looking for Pat Callis' 1969 AAJ article on this climb and can't guess the correct file name...
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 24, 2008 - 09:53pm PT
It's been offline for a few days now.

All I could find was the photos from the 1969 AAJ, which has a photo of the cliff (with no line for the climb) on p.67 and a couple of photos of Harding on p.68.

http://www.americanalpineclub.org/AAJO/pdfs/1969/photos1969aaj.pdf
Tom

Big Wall climber
San Luis Obispo CA
Jun 25, 2008 - 05:32pm PT
Watch out for the notorious Hurricane Jingus that suddenly erupts just after dark. As the warm air rises and venturi-hugs the walls of the amphitheater, it swirls itself into this crazy vortex that is strong enough to pull lit cigarettes and campfires downhill and into the dry brush in the sand slopes below. As I recall, the wind comes from the Falls toward the Arrow, and roars until long into the night. You might want to take the wind-chill into account when planning for bivi gear. The Hurricane runs at about 10-20 mph, and the Second Error is right in the blast.
nboles

Trad climber
fremont. ca
Jun 26, 2008 - 10:09am PT
The wind is no joke ... winter or summer it blows from just after sun set to sunrise. Its like clock work.
If Clint is re-bolting the rap route with Tom Rohrer, he should get the info on the East chimney route.
That climb may have been established by Rohrer some time in the distant past. I freed the first pitch or two until the rivet ladders start, then it goes up to the east side chimney, more or less following the rap route.
When I put up the Pointless, up high I swung into the chimney and free climbed easy but funky rock with ancient fixed gear and short rivet ladders. There may be no more obscure route in the valley than this one.

norman
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Jun 26, 2008 - 12:53pm PT
Norman,

Cool - we'll check out the East Chimney.
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Jun 26, 2008 - 02:55pm PT
It's one of the few walls I've ever done, back around Nov. 81. We were a party of three, possibly the slowest ascent on record with three nights on the spacious ledges. One (late) morning on the Second Error, two guys came by racing up the chimney, looked over at the three of us still in our bags passing a joint back and forth, and blurted with aghast looks plastered to their mugs, "what are you guys doing???

Oh, so in terms of beta, I'd suggest you leave most of the weed behind.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 24, 2008 - 02:06pm PT
California- Yosemite
Lost Arrow, Direct Route. On June 21, after 4 1/2 days, Warren Harding and I completed what seemed to us an exceptionally esthetic new route on the Lost Arrow. It follows a nearly vertical line for the entire 1400 feet from base to tip, a line which, for the most part, appears completely blank from the Valley floor. I understand it was Herb SwedIund who conceived of the possibility of this route. He and Warren had climbed some 200 feet of it the preceding autumn but had to turn back. The route is built upon four main features which, besides contributing to the feasibility, lend an appealing continuity. These are three pinnacles and a tower. For the benefit of those not familiar with Yosemite climbing terminology, a pinnacle is an isolated flake (or the beginning of one) with a ledge on top. Consistent with this definition is that if there exists the hint of a notch separating the flake from the main wall (that is if one cannot chimney or lieback right to the summit) then it is called a tower. The first two pinnacles are called First Error and Second Error; they are 400 and 800 feet above the ground respectively. Both have large ledges and are well known to those who have climbed the classic Arrow Chimney route, the deep cleft forming the left side of the Lost Arrow. This is because both may be reached by climbing about 100 feet out of the Chimney. Although not visible from the Valley floor, there is a fine crack system connecting these two pinnacles. Two hundred feet above Second Error is a graceful tower and 200 feet higher is a 30-foot detached flake; we named these two First and Second Terror respectively. (The latter might also be called Last Error). Second Terror is only 100 feet below Salathe Ledge which is on the regular route to the Arrow’s summit via the notch. The route utilizes the right side of each of these features. We bivouacked on First Error, Second Error (twice), and Second Terror (an uncomfortable place relative to the others). There were some blank areas in between which required bolting but the labor of this was considerably reduced by a technique which Warren, with characteristic imagination, had developed. This involved using Chouinard cliffhangers in short bolt holes instead of placing bolts. Bolts were used only as dictated by safety. Thus only 21 bolts were placed although 55 holes were drilled. (A fear of being short of hangers caused us to leave 4 or 5 bolts without hangers on the first pitch; the nuts were left however.) Several factors make the climb an especially enjoyable one. First of all is the setting. The Arrow has long been an attractive challange to climbers and on this route its tip is almost constantly in view. It is next to impossible to put into words the pleasure of watching the nearby falls during the endless belays. It is a comfortable climb. There are no less than five large ledges on which it is possible for two or more climbers to sleep stretched out. (Besides First and Second Error and Salathe Ledge there is one just below Second Error and another just below Second Terror.) Finally, the climbing is continuously interesting; not one of the 14 pitches is fourth class. Though often exhilarating, the climbing is never severe nor horrifying. Technical Notes: NCCS VI, F8, A3; Necessary equipment includes 2 4-inch bongs and 3 Chouinard cliffhangers ground down to fit 1/4-inch bolt holes.
There are several long pitches of direct aid.
PATRIK CALLIS
[url="http://www.americanalpineclub.org/AAJO/pdfs/1969/unitedstates1969_371-403.pdf"]American Alpine Journal, 1969 page 371[/url]

Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 7, 2008 - 11:24pm PT
Where do you park the car while you're on the route?

yu-min

Big Wall climber
california, san diego
Sep 7, 2008 - 11:51pm PT
Tried a few months ago, Second terror is HUGE, even set up a tent on that ledge... the wind had it in our face the whole night but it made for a good story. (night gusts are CRAZY) I would def bring a few rivet hangers and a hook
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 1, 2008 - 10:48pm PT
seems that this coming weekend is a no-go...
...maybe in the spring.
lunchbox

Trad climber
santa cruz, ca
Oct 2, 2008 - 01:04am PT
Hey K-man,

We did this route in June 2007 and went left at pitch 13. The bolts in the ladder are ugly but Second Terror is so worth it. God I wish I had a pic of the view you get from that chimney! Definitely worth the trouble.

You can back up that sketchy belay of Star-Drives with #3 and #4 camalots. The belay bolts are in great shape but do not inspire confidence when compared with today's fatties.

It was cold and windy at night in June.
BooYah

Social climber
Ely, Nv
May 4, 2010 - 07:51pm PT
We parked by the Ranger showers.
3 days. That route is a blast. The wind howls at night.
Lambone

Ice climber
Ashland, Or
Apr 23, 2012 - 09:36am PT
Kind of a dumb question, but let's say you were going to do the tyrolean finish. How would you go about dealing with the haulbag? Haul them across the tyrolean also I suppose?
Lambone

Ice climber
Ashland, Or
Apr 23, 2012 - 09:47am PT
Well there ya go!
skcreidc

Social climber
SD, CA
Feb 11, 2014 - 09:08am PT
Any word on bolt replacement on this thing? Some of the earlier comments have me wondering. All good or should someone come fully prepared. Would like to try a 1 day on it so hoping to travel as light as possible.

Vitaliy M.

Mountain climber
San Francisco
Feb 11, 2014 - 10:12am PT
Kind of a dumb question, but let's say you were going to do the tyrolean finish. How would you go about dealing with the haulbag? Haul them across the tyrolean also I suppose?

Yes you haul it across. Not as bad as hauling your partner across after they can't figure things out. lol.

There is a variation that avoids the bad bolts. Supertopo variation is documented really well IN Big Walls guidebook and is accurate.
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