Good Anchors, Bad Anchors

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Messages 1 - 74 of total 74 in this topic
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Original Post - Apr 3, 2008 - 11:55am PT
In some places, stainless steel does not last too long.

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 3, 2008 - 11:57am PT
By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea?
hoipolloi

climber
A friends backyard with the neighbors wifi
Apr 3, 2008 - 12:07pm PT
i dont see the problem? Whats the problem here?
L

climber
If only I could remember....
Apr 3, 2008 - 12:10pm PT
You know, Chil, that sort of looks like a piece of art. A beautifully corroded, deadly piece of art.
Chaz

Trad climber
So. Cal.
Apr 3, 2008 - 12:13pm PT
Just rig up an American Triangle Of Death with that one and the one next to it, and call it good.
Grant Meisenholder

Trad climber
CA
Apr 3, 2008 - 12:30pm PT
"You've gotta ask yourself, 'Do you feel lucky?' Well, punk!?"
le_bruce

climber
Oakland: what's not to love?
Apr 3, 2008 - 12:31pm PT
Early this week had to wonder if this would hold a fall. Probably many here have clipped it - Overhang Bypass on LCR.


Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 12:37pm PT
By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea?

Steve knows the issue.

morphus

Mountain climber
Angleland
Apr 3, 2008 - 01:10pm PT
Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Apr 3, 2008 - 01:29pm PT
Yeah Bruce,

I first clipped that bolt 45 years ago. Then in the early 90s I replaced a ladder of exactly the same, right down to hangers. You may have heard of the spot: the East Buttress of Middle.

So I have a bit of relevant info for you: Can't vouch for the hanger, but the bolt itself is probably bomber.

When I dug into the wall behind what you clipped on the surface, I found 3/8" x 3" Star Dryvin lead shield anchors. Every one of them was a bitch to get out. Pulled hard with the pickel-fork and crowbar, and then had to scrape bits of lead out the hole with a dental tool before we could install new 5-piece.

Feel better?

Doug
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 01:40pm PT
L's remark about my photo,
A beautifully corroded, deadly piece of art
applies to morphus' even more. What was that?
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 01:43pm PT
DR:
When I dug into the wall behind what you clipped on the surface, I found 3/8" x 3" Star Dryvin lead
shield anchors.


I used to place only Star Dryvins on sandstone routes. I know lots of those have been replaced, but
haven't heard whether the old gear was worthless or still had traction.
TradIsGood

Chalkless climber
the Gunks end of the country
Apr 3, 2008 - 02:08pm PT
Stubai Klebehaken and epoxy worked at the one place I climbed in Gulf of Mexico.
Greg Barnes

climber
Apr 3, 2008 - 02:19pm PT
Doug's right on the 3/8" Star-Drives, don't pull straight out and they are fairly good, although that one is really rusty (sooner or later they'll rust to the point where the bolt will fail). I've pulled those in the Valley, Tuolumne, Red Rocks, and the Pinnacles, and as long as you first pull the nail and just the nail (not the sleeve), they're pretty easy to get out. That hanger is another matter though, those are known to snap (cleaned up a few snapped ones off the Nose, they break at the angle change near the biner).

For those who are wondering what's going on with the bolt in the first post, this article explains why titanium is the only option for seaside bolts, especially in warm climates:
http://www.safeclimbing.org/education/deepbluesea.htm
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley, Ca
Apr 3, 2008 - 02:28pm PT
Titanium "glue in" bolts are way expensive ($15 last I checked), but they should last at least 30 years...
Here's one I placed on Hot Tuna at Mickey's Beach before chopping and patching the original:



Believe it or knott, that old bolt wasn't even stainless; four carbon-steel bolts were placed on that route:

Here's a close up of one of them:



What amazed me was how hard it was to break these 1/2" bolts with a 2 1/2 lb sledge.
When I finally got them to snap, you could see that the steel was still shiny other
than the 1/2 mm or so around the outer edge. I don't have the photos handy at the
moment as I am on the laptop - I just grabbed the above photos off my lame-ass website.

In the meantime, check out this cool carbon-steel anchor...



-and the titanium replacement:



I would also like to point out that when Dirty Kenny and me were doing a bunch of
rebolting at Mickey's, we also chopped and patched a bunch of old 3/8" stainless bolts.

http://www.safeclimbing.org/areas/california/mickeysbeach.htm

Although many of these were 15 years old, they still required a good effort to remove.
I came to the conclusion that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) is knott occurring out
in these parts, as it is in the Limestone sea cliffs of Thailand, Vietnam, Cayman Brac, ect.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 02:37pm PT
stich:
Titanium glue-ins for them sea cliffs. Only gear that'll be there tomorrow.

A few days ago I watched Lord Slime clean a pitch of not-very-old stainless bolts like the one
on the left. One bolt snapped off under hand pressure. About half of them shattered when
torqued lightly with a wrench. The remainder broke like dry twigs with a few taps from a
hammer.

Ushba Tortuga titanium glue-ins, like the one at right below, seem to be faring a lot better.

Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 05:41pm PT
perswig

climber
Apr 3, 2008 - 07:16pm PT
Chiloe, I'm with L. That nut pic ^ is beautiful. Were you tryin', or is that just a happenstance of amazing colors and juxta textures?
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 3, 2008 - 08:20pm PT
Seems like a good test case for some very fat studs and beefy stainless keyhole hangers to keep the exposed metal to a minimum. The Aussies used to employ those tactics on routes routinely way back in the day. Just have to have a big glass jar full of keyhole sets down at the local watering hole for the borrowing! Just a modest proposal. LOL
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Apr 3, 2008 - 09:32pm PT
cool thread
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 09:33pm PT
perswig:
Chiloe, I'm with L. That nut pic ^ is beautiful. Were you tryin', or is that just a happenstance
of amazing colors and juxta textures?


Thanks. I set up that nut picture, but just casually -- I'm far from being a real photographer like
Jerry, Nefarius or Wes.

The earlier ring-bolt picture that started the thread was just a snapshot, though. I reached the
top of a pitch and thought "Wow, lookit that!" I didn't even notice the second crack until
I enlarged the pic later.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 09:42pm PT
Steve Grossman:
Seems like a good test case for some very fat studs and beefy stainless keyhole hangers to
keep the exposed metal to a minimum.


There's a theory I would not want to test, after all the cracked-through (not eroded from
the surface) stainless I've seen in the past two weeks. When you're backing off the edge on a
free rap with waves booming against the undercut wall below, or thinking about an F2 fall on
your sling belay as the leader calls "Watch me!" before he's reached the first pro --
more excitement is not needed, even to save money.

Then there's the story of a climber who yelled "Take!", gently weighted his top bolt, and
zippered the pitch.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Apr 3, 2008 - 09:44pm PT
You know, somehow those old star drives and button heads in leeper hangers don't seem so bad anymore.

It's amazing how the issue of "good" and "bad" bolts isn't so clear cut.

I've been replacing the bolts on a face climb that one would think should be absolute mank. 1/4" button heads, smc ss hangers, probably placed 20 years ago in sandstone, and maybe 200 yds from a saltwater fjord. You'd think they'd be absolute rusted through mank, but I've been having a bear of a time pulling the bolts. All the original locations were too close to cracks or were fractured so the new bolts went neerby in as good a location as I could find.

I'm thinking the mitigating factors that limit corrosion are lower temps and hence lower humidity, almost a constant breeze blowing down the arm, and many freshwater sources feeding into the arm.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 09:49pm PT
L

climber
If only I could remember....
Apr 3, 2008 - 09:54pm PT
Now that is art!

And it looks like something that isn't going to make the rock bleed like in Hardman's photos...another plus.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 09:55pm PT
tolman paul:
I'm thinking the mitigating factors that limit corrosion are lower temps and hence lower humidity,
almost a constant breeze blowing down the arm, and many freshwater sources feeding into the arm.


I suspect you're right about the variables. Brac is a warm, hypersaline environment, with salt
spray soaking the limestone cliffs top to bottom. On many routes you've got to watch the waves carefully
to judge whether the belays will be safe.

I've heard that Cuba and Thailand face similar problems, though. Perhaps there are others.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2008 - 10:23pm PT
Bad anchor, good anchor -- I didn't bother to clip the one on the left.
The sheared-off remains of its twin can be seen to the right of the Tortuga bolt.

Double D

climber
Apr 3, 2008 - 11:00pm PT
Chiloe, as always, awesome photos.

morphus: That's one of the best "ancient anchor" pictures that I've ever seen...truely classic!
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2008 - 09:35am PT
Upthread, Greg Barnes rightly noted the key article on this topic by John Byrnes, Skip Harper
& Mike Shelton, "The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea." In case anyone missed his post:

For those who are wondering what's going on with the bolt in the first post, this article explains
why titanium is the only option for seaside bolts, especially in warm climates:

http://www.safeclimbing.org/education/deepbluesea.htm
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 5, 2008 - 11:56am PT
And, speaking of the devil, I am authorized to channel the following note to Hardman
Knott. Old rec.climbers will immediately recognize the voice.

***
Yo Hardman Knot, didja forget what I taught you?

First of all... 30 years?! Not a f*#king chance. The Tortuga bolts will out-live everyone
and anyone reading Supertopo today, and their children, grandchildren and great
grandchildren (ad infinitum).

Secondly, you said, "Although many of these were 15 years old, they still required a
good effort to remove. I came to the conclusion that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC)
is knott occurring out in these parts, as it is in the Limestone sea cliffs of Thailand,
Vietnam, Cayman Brac, etc." But earlier you said the bolts were mere carbon steel (or
perhaps galvanized).

Doh! SCC ONLY occurs in Stainless. So you even though you got the right answer, you
still got it wrong! ;-)

So when are YOU gonna get down to the Brac? I need someone to belay me.

    Lord Slime, still kickin'
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 9, 2008 - 11:36am PT
I need someone to belay me.

OK, I've shuffled through a few more of the too-many photos from last week. Here's the
project on which Lord Slime needs a Hardman Knott belay. Solitude, striking views,
steep clean wall -- ain't been redpointed yet AFAWK.

Shrug

Trad climber
Apr 9, 2008 - 11:45am PT
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 9, 2008 - 11:51am PT
Shrug's anchor looks much prettier than mine. Is it bad or good?
Shrug

Trad climber
Apr 9, 2008 - 02:05pm PT
Well... the fall foliage is pretty.

The anchor... scared me quite frankly.
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
Apr 9, 2008 - 03:00pm PT
Shrug, what's the purple webbing doing, it looks slack?



Here's an anchor I had to bail off in a storm.
Prod

Social climber
Charlevoix, MI
Apr 9, 2008 - 03:16pm PT
Hey Bluering,

I thought the purple webbing was the bad anchor and the green was the good?

Also, I'd retreat off of your anchor any day, looked bomber. No?

Prod.
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley, Ca
Apr 9, 2008 - 03:17pm PT
Chiloe wrote (and quoted the legendary Lord Slime):

And, speaking of the devil, I am authorized to channel the following note to Hardman Knott.
Old rec.climbers will immediately recognize the voice.

***
Yo Hardman Knot, didja forget what I taught you?

First of all... 30 years?! Not a f*#king chance. The Tortuga bolts will out-live everyone
and anyone reading Supertopo today, and their children, grandchildren and great
grandchildren (ad infinitum).

Secondly, you said, "Although many of these were 15 years old, they still required a
good effort to remove. I came to the conclusion that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC)
is knott occurring out in these parts, as it is in the Limestone sea cliffs of Thailand,
Vietnam, Cayman Brac, etc." But earlier you said the bolts were mere carbon steel (or
perhaps galvanized).

Doh! SCC ONLY occurs in Stainless. So you even though you got the right answer, you
still got it wrong! ;-)

So when are YOU gonna get down to the Brac? I need someone to belay me.

    Lord Slime, still kickin'


***


Hey Lord Slime - learn to fuçking read!! ;-)


Here's what I wrote above (bold added):

I would also like to point out that when Dirty Kenny and me were doing a bunch of
rebolting at Mickey's, we also chopped and patched a bunch of old 3/8" stainless bolts.

http://www.safeclimbing.org/areas/california/mickeysbeach.htm

Although many of these were 15 years old, they still required a good effort to remove.
I came to the conclusion that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) is knott occurring out
in these parts, as it is in the Limestone sea cliffs of Thailand, Vietnam, Cayman Brac, ect.



Anyway, tell Lord Slime I'll try to make it one of these days, hopefully before I'm too old to climb...

bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
Apr 9, 2008 - 03:26pm PT
Prod, since I'm still here it was a pretty good anchor. I was the last one off the thing and snapped the pic thinking, "That's be weird if this anchors fails and the pic is in my camera".

Anyway, it consisted of three tiny nuts, only one of which I felt real good about.

The largest guy in our threesome went first and we watched the rig. After that I felt pretty good about it.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 9, 2008 - 10:24pm PT
Hey Lord Slime - learn to fuçking read!! ;-)

That belay session oughtta be FUNny.


But the photo of Slime's project reminded me of a lesser bad-anchors issue,
this one involving carabiners.


Below his Lordship in this pic, there's an odd-looking clip. Looking closer, it
turns out that he passed up a bolt with a quickdraw on it. That's a bad old
bolt, but it's a bad old quickdraw too.


Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 9, 2008 - 10:29pm PT
Any solid-gate biner that you leave behind, in this environment, becomes fused shut in
less than a week. After that, it takes tools to remove them. So if you leave a bail
biner, it clutters up the bolt indefinitely. You should never bail on a solid-gate
biner here. The quickdraw in my photo above was left by some previous party, and
until that bolt gets chopped or breaks off, it's part of the route.

Wiregate biners remain open-able for somewhat longer, but even they look pretty sketchy
after a few weeks in that air.

Shrug

Trad climber
Apr 10, 2008 - 12:20am PT
Bluering, I have no clue. I just kinda paused, sighed, took the picture and walked on. The up rooted tree was enough.

But I dug up the raw photo from last fall, it does look like it's just slack for something. Maybe it's tied to something over the edge. Prob an old pin.

Like this one that was found on the same bluff. :)

bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA
Apr 10, 2008 - 02:34am PT
Back in the late 80's Metolius came out with their "P-bolts" which look very similar to the Ushba Ti bolts shown here. One problem with the P-bolts was that they could unclip themselves if the carabiner was rotated up 180 degrees and the gate was pushed against the top(straight section of the 'P') of the bolt.

Has anyone seen this happening with Ushba's?

Bruce
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2008 - 08:13am PT
Bruce, do you have a photo of a P-bolt?

In a few hundred clips, I haven't seen anything like this happening with the titanium Tortuga
bolts, though that doesn't prove it can't.

Most of the exposed part of the Tortuga bolt has a smooth, ring-like radius, which ought
to reduce any danger of catching.


Jim E

climber
Mountain Road
Apr 10, 2008 - 09:42am PT
How about a rock V-thread? The rope was in there so tight it was not possible to inspect what was inside. I wonder how the hell they got it in there.

Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2008 - 10:26am PT
Cool, Jim. I'm told that in Thailand, rock V-threads have been drilled as the cheap alternative
to titanium bolts. And/or you drill a whole nest of steel bolts and tie them all together, the
5-wrongs-make-a-right theory.

Anybody got photos/stories of such anchors?
Shrug

Trad climber
Apr 10, 2008 - 10:57am PT
oakie, Devil's Lake Wisconsin of all places. There are old pins scattered around the area. mostly pre 80's I think. Some still look ok to clip actually, (I have clipped a few). That one though... The ring was rusted through at one part, Wish I got a closer picture. I have been debating if it was homemade or not.
Greg Barnes

climber
Apr 10, 2008 - 11:29am PT
Hey Bruce, the same thing can happen with any eye bolts, and actually it can happen with nearly any hanger - it's almost easier with a regular hanger. It is most probable with stiff draws with the bolt end biner fixed (i.e. those rubber stabilizers to keep biners from rotating - typically only on the rope end).

If you have an eye bolt clipped (eg glue-in), rotate the draw 30 degrees with the clip-in biner gate up, push it up, then move it towards the bolt. Unclips.

If you have a standard hanger (which have the clip-in point angled down and right), clip a draw to it with the gate facing left, push the draw up, then push it left - same thing, biner unclips.

The size of the biner and the size of the hanger can limit how it can happen - for instance, a micro biner that isn't tall enough to get the nose of the biner above the top of the hanger might not be able to unclip (depending on hanger).

The thing about it is that it's very hard to do in practice while climbing, you pretty much have to be scumming your body on the draw to do it, and even then it'd be quite the trick to do it. Much more common is the biner clipped to the bolt rotating and getting crossloaded (often with the base of the gate hanging on the edge of the bolt hanger, or with the dogbone hanging on the gate itself) - this happens all the time, and luckily people usually don't fall.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Apr 12, 2008 - 08:19am PT
bump as a reminder - for someone...
thanks :)
Nudge Nudge

Trad climber
WI, now CA
Apr 12, 2008 - 05:44pm PT
Had to add these from some hillbilly's attempt to set up the Rostrum highline last summer. Had two draws off his belay loop for the tyrolean, which he struggled to get over the knot and nonlockers attaching the rope to the webbing. Wouldn't listen to anybody. I wish I got a shot of their final highline anchor. Spooky.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 14, 2008 - 09:23am PT
Might be interesting to post photos of "the best I could do" anchors, ones we built
ourselves from unpromising materials.

In the meantime, here's a close look at one more snapped-off Brac bolt.

emac

climber
New Hampshire
Apr 16, 2008 - 10:51am PT
The bolt says it all. Located in the Superstitions, AZ.

Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 18, 2008 - 09:35am PT
Emac, it's thoughtful of the route developers to label their bolts that way. Read your hangers before clipping!
rick d

Social climber
tucson, az
Apr 18, 2008 - 10:07am PT
supes bolt is likely a "Bandito" made by Dan Langemade & Stan Mish at Dan's metal business in Phoenix. We also made a few but not that clean.......
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 18, 2008 - 10:48am PT
Channeling Lord Slime again, his observations about my bolt photo above --

Regards your photo of the broken bolt... It's a great photo
of a stainless steel "clad" bolt. It's easy to see the
stainless cladding and the mild steel that's rusted and
broken.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 18, 2008 - 12:17pm PT
Bandito hanger for sure! "No Gud" was a popular hanger stamp for those guys also. Marshall Gud was the arch rival and nemesis of the infamous Banditos and none other than Jim Waugh!
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Apr 18, 2008 - 12:32pm PT
Best I could do in Cochise Stronghold...


Bomber...

-Brian in SLC
rick d

Social climber
tucson, az
Apr 18, 2008 - 11:17pm PT
SG-

that pesky Marshall Gud. Damn glad Mish bolted his door shut!

...waugh had a few in his collection and I think mish gave him a super size leeper hanger and bolt (bolt was 1" diameter, hanger was like a foot across).
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 27, 2008 - 09:24pm PT
Belay glove.

cowpoke

climber
Apr 27, 2008 - 09:30pm PT
sharp rock? or just get your hand stuck?
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - May 3, 2008 - 05:37pm PT
sharp rock? or just get your hand stuck?

Razor edged thread ... cool stuff.
wildone

climber
Where you want to be
May 4, 2008 - 07:15pm PT
That's rad.
Conrad

climber
May 5, 2008 - 12:24am PT




North Six Shooter is one of the classic desert spires. This is a glimpse looking down from the top of the second pitch. First time on this route was ’85 with a climbing partner 14 years my senior. I returned this year with a friend to re-visit this six star of a shooter route.

The first time we rapped off with the MEH star driven angle iron contraptions pictured below. Some where on the route there was a sturdy old oval with M E HORN stamped on the spine. Figuring it was better to replace it with a more modern biner and keen on a little artifact I pocketed it as a souvenir.

Life is linear (my read on it) and every once and a while one happens onto an instance that connects back in time. Was it coincidence or a matter of putting the biner in my pocket?

Ends up Maurice Horn lives in Bozeman, MT and I have had the chance to meet him. He still climbs and finds great joy in opening new routes. As a man of the venerable Fred generation it inspires me to see him out climbing.

The rap stations have been updated with sturdy gear and positioned just a little better for rope pulls. The team to replace the bolts, thankfully, left the MEH bolt intact as a museum piece in a cathedral for those who can appreciate it.



Not a bad bolt, rather a storied bolt.


Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Topic Author's Reply - May 5, 2008 - 09:08am PT
The team to replace the bolts, thankfully, left the MEH bolt intact as a museum piece
in a cathedral for those who can appreciate it.


I like that image.
the museum

Trad climber
Rapid City, SD
May 5, 2008 - 11:40pm PT
slobmonster

Trad climber
berkeley, ca
May 6, 2008 - 12:10am PT
exactly what is this supposed to convey?
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Jun 10, 2010 - 12:03am PT
^^^ That those (crooked) Metolius Rap Hangers put a twist in the rope… and that those SS Fixe wedge bolts should have another thread or two exposed?



Stumbled across this while searching for bolts…

For you Dirtheads:

“The best screw you will have in the dirt!”

http://www.americanea.com/proddetail.php?prod=PE26-TC

Put a socket on yer power drill and you’ve got yer next super-mega-choss summit anchor! Too funny…
mucci

Trad climber
The pitch of Bagalaar above you
Jun 13, 2010 - 04:49am PT
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Jun 13, 2010 - 05:35am PT
That those (crooked) Metolius Rap Hangers put a twist in the rope…

Haven't experienced that yet.
Sitting Duck

Mountain climber
The Arctic
Jun 13, 2010 - 09:17am PT
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Jun 13, 2010 - 10:38am PT
Great thread everyone!
quietpartner

Trad climber
Moantannah
Jun 13, 2010 - 01:42pm PT
Re: Conrad's post above...


I was climbing with Maurice when I fell and broke my ankle....he's a cool cat and a great climbing buddy. Thanks for the belay Maurice!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jun 13, 2010 - 01:51pm PT
Here is an instance in life where good/bad covers the entire spectrum- no grey areas here.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 13, 2010 - 03:16pm PT
No splitting of shafts necessary!

How do those alloy glue-ins hold up with respect to load deformation from hard falls?

Epoxied in 1/2" stainless machine bolts and keyhole hangers might be the easiest system to maintain since bolts could be backed out, the holes redrilled and new bolts re-epoxied into position once the old ones have expired.

No point in leaving hangers in place to corrode away...

thebravecowboy

Social climber
Colorado Plateau
Sep 20, 2013 - 11:23pm PT
Frum today
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