Old mystery pro

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donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jul 17, 2017 - 08:43am PT
When I did the FA of Torre Egger we climbed the "supposed" 1959 Maestri/Egger line to the Col of Conquest. We found many arifacts in the first 300 meters leading to a prominent snowfied....this turned out to be their highpoint.
Wooden wedge from Maestri/Egger 1959
Wooden wedge from Maestri/Egger 1959
Credit: donini
The previous year I found the remains of Toni Egger where the glacier from the base of Cerro Torre bottomed out on the flat, dry glacier.
Credit: donini
There were many artifacts so finding additional ones would be no surprise.
nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Jul 17, 2017 - 08:56am PT
So marlow, your chock is a genuine Old Mystery Pro, and... a magnificent sample!
Fritz

Social climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jul 17, 2017 - 09:49am PT
Timmc! Re your question:
Any tricks to reveal markings?

24 hours in vinegar & then a little light scrubbing with dish soap or Bartender's Friend & a plastic Scothbrite pad, works wonders on oxidized old biners.

If it is an early Chouinard, this is what you are looking for.
CHOUINARD will be very-faint & hard to see on one side, per this photo.

Gate is marked KB, for the original owner Ken Boche.
Gate is marked KB, for the original owner Ken Boche.
Credit: Fritz

820 & ALCOA should be much more distinct on the opposite side.

Credit: Fritz
Timmc

climber
BC
Jul 17, 2017 - 09:52am PT
Wow Jim, that's a startling photo of Toni Egger's remains.

I also found a big cache of gear above the Nunatak that contained all kinds of stuff from early Patagonia clothing to ropes of different generations.
It likely melted out.

Will dig up some photos...
Timmc

climber
BC
Jul 17, 2017 - 10:06am PT
Thanks Fritz. Can't wait to do this.
karabin museum

Trad climber
phoenix, az
Jul 17, 2017 - 10:40am PT


Donini - Jim, what did you do with the Toni Egger artifacts? I hope you donated them to a museum or something. They are awesome especially the leg bone in the boot!!! So very cool!!!

Marlow and Stephane - The nut shape looks like a very large Gendarme which the cord holes were more rounded out. Mystery nut for sure!

karabin museum

Trad climber
phoenix, az
Jul 17, 2017 - 11:05am PT

In the 1958 REI catalog it has two listings under the hammer showing one is Austrian (1 1/4lb) and one is Swiss (1 3/4lb). So I visited the post office this morning and they weighed the hammer for me showing it weighs in at one pound 4.4 ounces (20.4 oz), so it is the Austrian hammer which I have and is the one pictured in the REI catalog. The Swiss hammer weighs a 1/2 pound more....dang! Possibly the Swiss hammer and the Austrian hammer look alike?

Now the question is....what company in Austria created the unmarked Austrian hammers for REI?

1958 Austrian hammer and 1958 REI catalog
1958 Austrian hammer and 1958 REI catalog
Credit: karabin museum

Timmc

climber
BC
Jul 18, 2017 - 08:24am PT
Here a a few photos of the gear I found near Cerro Torre:

Old Patagonia label and pants.
Old Patagonia label and pants.
Credit: Timmc
Timmc

climber
BC
Jul 18, 2017 - 08:26am PT
Credit: Timmc
Timmc

climber
BC
Jul 20, 2017 - 09:00am PT
Hey Fritz,

I have that old biner soacking on vinegar , but I can totally make out
820 and ALCOA- so a Choiunard for sure

I also found this on the glacier below Cerro Torre:

Credit: Timmc

Old ice screw I suspect.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jul 20, 2017 - 09:13am PT
Yes, an ice srew...I actually used srews nearly identical to that in the late 60's.
Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Jul 20, 2017 - 09:29am PT
Marty it would almost have to have come from the Stubai Collective, wouldn 't it?

DMT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 20, 2017 - 09:36am PT

It's possibly an old Stubai Marwa ice screw, though it is hard to see all the features from the photo. I think the Marwa was the first commercially available ice screw.

Marty has posted pictures earlier on ST: http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1343654&msg=1376819#msg1376819

It could also be a Charlet Moser like the one Fritz posted earlier, though there's a clear difference at the top of the head: http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1540620&msg=1540912#msg1540912
karabin museum

Trad climber
phoenix, az
Jul 20, 2017 - 06:20pm PT

I am not sure who made that ice screw. The Stubai Marwa is pictured on the top of this photo and I am not sure who makes the other shown third down. You can see both are different than the Timmc mystery ice screw.

Credit: photo from ebay

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 20, 2017 - 07:32pm PT
Marty- Your hammer is likely made by Austrialpin who maddeningly doesn't stamp their gear except "MADE IN AUSTRIA".
The third ice screw down in your photo should be a Charlet-Moser.
The mystery screw looks like a Marwa but with a welded rather than wrapped eye detail which I have never seen.
WyoRockMan

climber
Grizzlyville, WY
Jul 20, 2017 - 07:48pm PT
Marty,

My uncle had this piton hammer that he bought from REI in 1967. It weighs 19.1 oz. It was made by Salewa.
Not rare (I wouldn't guess) but your pic above reminded me that I had it.


Credit: WyoRockMan
Fritz

Social climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jul 20, 2017 - 08:03pm PT
Donini! Re your input!

Yes, an ice srew...I actually used srews nearly identical to that in the late 60's.


Please claify, was that the 1960's, or the 1860's?

karabin museum

Trad climber
phoenix, az
Jul 20, 2017 - 10:10pm PT



Steve - Did AustriAlpin make gear in the 1950s?

WyoRockMan - I have Salewa hammers like that but I always associate Salewa with West Germany not Austria, where REI says they are from Austria. Nice artifact! Maybe a distributor in Austria was importing Salewa hammers and sending them to REI? My hammer has no markings on the head or handle.



nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Jul 21, 2017 - 01:20am PT
On a second generation of Charlet-Moser Super Mont-Blanc ice axe, the hole in the adze was modified in a shape of a keyhole that allowed the Charlet-Moser ice-screws to be driven with the axe.
Frendo catalog 1970-1971
Frendo catalog 1970-1971
Credit: nutstory
Regarding the ice-screw on the bottom of Marty's photo, Dahu thinks that it is a Simond Conique Frapper (1974).
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jul 21, 2017 - 06:45am PT
When you think of the development of climbing gear since climbing became a sport in the mid 19th Century a couple of things come to mind.
For roughly the first 100 years climbing was dominated by British aristocrats and the local Swiss and French guide class that arose to service them. This led to very little development of either equipment or technique because of the hidebound, traditional mindset. Consider that steps were still being cut on ice climbs in the mid 1950's and front points on crampons were so late in coming.
I believe that when Don Whillans and Joe Brown appeared on the scene and opened up Brutish climbing to the working classes the mindset began to change.
But the real changes were brought about by brash Americans who came from a culture where tradition had little force and new ideas were paramount.
Chouinard revolutionized ice climbing both in the development of new techniques and equipment. Likewise, Yosemite did the same for rockclimbing. The concept of free climbing without grabbing the occasional piece (French free), big wall techniques, and innovative gear like cams all had their genesis in the Valley.
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