Old mystery pro

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 121 - 140 of total 187 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Basilisk

Ice climber
New Hampshire
Nov 25, 2008 - 05:14pm PT
I'd buy some also!

Just another reason I love this thread. Thanks for sharing folks
scuffy b

climber
On the dock in the dark
Nov 25, 2008 - 05:54pm PT
There's a market for I-Beams???
couchmaster

climber
Mar 3, 2009 - 11:56am PT
Gear bump for the gear whores. BTW, I have some EB'S I sewed leather onto which I'll try to get a pic on. The thin canvas usually got eaten through before the sole if you did any kind of sharp crack or offwidth jamming. They were very expensive shoes then, I think @ $30 a pair or so if memory serves me right.
anees

climber
Oct 30, 2010 - 09:03pm PT
Bump...

Does anyone recognize this nut?
Credit: anees

For more info and photos, plus bigger photo size, you can go to the original post over at MP (http://www.mountainproject.com/v/climbing_gear_discussion/can_anyone_id_this_old_mystery_nut/106943278#a_106943375)

This nut was dug out of the back of the Stanford Alpine Club's gear shed... is it some sorta neat old-school California original?
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Oct 30, 2010 - 11:05pm PT
Alex,

I agree - it looks homemade. Looks like milling marks on the largest face.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Oct 31, 2010 - 01:46am PT
What does the top of the nut look like?
Clint Cummins

Trad climber
SF Bay area, CA
Oct 31, 2010 - 02:46am PT
The images are on the MP link:
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Oct 31, 2010 - 03:01am PT
Yup, homemade for sure!
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Dec 16, 2011 - 11:56am PT
This is a cool thread.
crunch

Social climber
CO
Feb 24, 2013 - 04:43pm PT
Out of the sad, and massive clean-up operation to dispose of Jenny Martin's piles-o-stuff in her garage:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=2066314&tn=0&mr=0

Salvaged a handful of old gear. Evidently stored on one of the coasts for some time, much corroded, far too gone and decrepit for any climbing use, but a few interesting items:

Bedayn Biner. This one in good shape, 3 others badly corroded/tarnishe...
Bedayn Biner. This one in good shape, 3 others badly corroded/tarnished/pitted
Credit: crunch

Some old Chouinard "Regular" Hexentrics and a couple wired stoppers of about the same vintage.

And some alternative Hexagons/Regular Hexentrics. The larger, #6 Eigers are shaped, like the early Chouinard Hexentrics, to have a wider lower, bearing face, narrower upper, non-bearing face:

Eiger Hexagons
Eiger Hexagons
Credit: crunch

"6" on back and front, no manufacturer stamp, presumably Eiger????
"6" on back and front, no manufacturer stamp, presumably Eiger????
Credit: crunch

Colorado Nut Hexagon 1.5:

Colorado Nut Number 1 and a half
Colorado Nut Number 1 and a half
Credit: crunch

Colorado Nut One-and-One-Half. Love the oversize number-stamping and t...
Colorado Nut One-and-One-Half. Love the oversize number-stamping and the classic use of the fraction instead of the decimal.
Credit: crunch

As well as an SMC Hexagon, which, like the Colorado Nut Hex, is an exact hexagon in profile:

SMC Hexagon, unusual is that the bearing faces are not sized larger th...
SMC Hexagon, unusual is that the bearing faces are not sized larger than the non-bearing faces--a true haxagon shape
Credit: crunch

And a couple mystery nuts:

Here's a hexagon. A true hexagon, again. No markings except a lengthwise seam of some kind on one of the non-bearing faces:

Mystery hex nut.
Mystery hex nut.
Credit: crunch

Mystery hex
Mystery hex
Credit: crunch

And, maybe easier, an unmarked nut, possibly a baby Moac? (EDIT: It's a Gendarme! Thanks Steve Grossman).

nut
nut
Credit: crunch

nut
nut
Credit: crunch

nut
nut
Credit: crunch

The mystery gear might be Colorado Nut Co. related, since Jenny lived in the Chicken Coop for a while. A mystery why she would have these ancient relics, she'd have been a little kid when many of these were made. but, she sure seemed to not throw much away....

Maybe someone might even recognize these. Pale blue paint on some items. Also initials, maybe DCH, stamped on a nylon Foxhead?

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 24, 2013 - 04:46pm PT
The last one is a Gendarme Nut.

The #6 is an Eiger for sure.
wivanoff

Trad climber
CT
Feb 24, 2013 - 04:53pm PT
Here's a hexagon. A true hexagon, again. No markings except a lengthwise seam of some kind on one of the non-bearing faces:

It's not a seam. It's an extrusion mark from an imperfection in the extruding die and doesn't affect anything. The nut was cut from hex stock, holes drilled, ends tapered.
crunch

Social climber
CO
Feb 24, 2013 - 05:10pm PT
Wow, Steve. An answer within, what, 3 minutes? Uncanny!

Never heard of Gendarme Nuts, but I have now. A quick search reveals they were made near Seneca Rocks, hence Gendarme name.

I'm seeing a parallel here with the early Chouinard pitons. As Chouinard modified and streamlined their early pitons manufacturing, other manufacturers were driven out of business (or just lost interest). Seems like a similar process with the early nuts. The larger sizes were easy enough to make and many folks tried their hand: Eiger, SMC, Colorado Nut Co.

But Chouinard's/Frost's development of "Regular Hexentrics" and then the even more sophisticated Poly-whatsit Hexentrics was enough to make much of the domestic competition gave up.

Cheers,
Crusher

EDIT: Thanks for the clarification, wivanoff!

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 24, 2013 - 05:19pm PT
Plenty of information about Gendarme Nuts here...

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1397992&tn=20

I have a full set to post up soon.

The market dominance of Chouinard Equipment definitely chased a lot of small shapers on to other things.

Tom and Yvon understood that a full range of sizes was just as valuable in a selection of nuts as it was with a rack of pitons. Why this idea didn't have traction in Britain is a mystery.

Most small businesses aren't willing to spring for the sort of big extrusions necessary to compete. Eiger was willing to have their own extrusions made to compete with Chouinard in the larger sizes.
nutstory

climber
Ajaccio, Corsica, France
Apr 18, 2013 - 03:36am PT
I acquired this little nut yesterday, and I would appreciate some help from you to identify it. It does not have any famous logo stamped on it. After cleaning it a little, it seems that I can see an “E” stamped on one face. As it does not seem to be “home made”, I am sure that someone here will be easily able to put a name to this “E Nut”. Marty, Steve…?

"E Nut"
"E Nut"
Credit: nutstory
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 20, 2013 - 02:55pm PT
Stephane- Did that come from a European source or North America?

If NA I would guess that it is an MSR wedge but I don't have one to confirm that. The maker had a power swager and did a neat job on the nut so I suspect that it was in production.

Anybody else have a clue?
tansofun

climber
Long Beach, CA
Apr 21, 2013 - 09:52am PT
Credit: tansofun
Anybody know what this is? Looks like a camming nut of some sort. No identifying marks, found it in a gear shop in Kathmandu. Sorry for the poor phone pic.
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Apr 21, 2013 - 10:36am PT
Missed this the first around, but it's a fun thread. Read the link to the Needle Sports history of nuts linked on the first page and this caught my eye:

Let's come back to England where, in a small village in the Peak District, Mark Vallance, creator of Wild Country, improved considerably the most classic pyramidal nut. "Rare are the cracks showing the same profile as the nuts". Starting from this statement, in 1978, Mark Vallance thought of changing the two large flat sides to create the maximum possible point contact with the rock. Using some Forrest Foxheads as prototypes he tried a large number of combinations to obtain finally the first curved nut, marketed early in 1979 under the name of Rock. No matter what the angle formed by both sides of a crack, the Rocks have always a three-point contact instead of only two for the pyramidal nut. By coincidence, at about the same time, Geoff Birtles, the Editor of High Mountain Sports magazine, worked with Tom Proctor on a closely similar design. They offered Mark Vallance the name Rocks which was what their device was called.

A curved stopper was made by Richard Harrison and John Long in Richard’s basement in Upland, California sometime around 1974-1975. They took a file to a Chouinard number 7 stopper and gave it into a curved shape, and named it the “Banana Nut”. I was skeptical about it when they showed it to me, but found that it worked well.

Wild Country later patented the curved stopper and when Chouinard brought out its own version, Wild Country sued for patent infringement. Around 1983, Dick Leversee, who was working for Chouinard, called me to confirm the existence of the Banana Nut and I became a witness in the lawsuit.

I testified that the curved design was already in use by Richard, John and I , a fact that was legally significant and could have invalidated the patent under the doctrine called “prior art.”

Richard gave Chouinard’s lawyers the Banana Nut for use in the litigation, but he never got it back. I think the lawsuit was settled out of court, but I am not sure.

Around the same time, Richard and John also filed down a Chouinard Hexentric, giving it a curved side which allowed it to act like a cam.
tansofun

climber
Long Beach, CA
Apr 21, 2013 - 11:15am PT
Reply to my own question, it looks like a wire tri-cam.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 21, 2013 - 01:25pm PT
Wired variation on the theme of an Abalakov cam made from a pulley wheel and not likely a commercial release.

Ricky- Sounds like a colossal waste of money trying to enforce a patent on a nut shape like that but I guess they thought that they had something original.

More questions for Yvon once I get a chance to sit down with him. Tom was gone by then.
Messages 121 - 140 of total 187 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews