Climbing at Cathedral & Whitehorse +Flying Kites at Cape Cod

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Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Original Post - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:10am PT








I once had dinner with Henry Barber and after a good Brunello and a bit too much of some fine Armagnac, Henry cheerfuly ate half a wine glass. Nice trick: he says it's all about commitment and once you start, you cannot escape until you have carefully chewed the shards into fine sand.

Somewhere during our rambling conversation he noted that throughout my travels I’d entertained the various highlight destinations of the west: Yosemite, The Needles of Dakota & California, Taquitz, Tuolumne, Joshua Tree, Devils Tower, Veedawoo, Eldorado, Canyonlands, The Diamond and so forth. I’d lived in the Valley for 10 summers and spent 10 years in short striking distance of Eldorado Canyon.

“Sounds like it’s high time you head East young man, to round things out, as that is sorely missing from your repertoire”
… how true I thought.

I’d been fortunate enough to meet during my travels the likes of Hot Henry & Ed Webster; I’d hung out briefly with the venerable Jimmy Dunn and was likewise acquainted with the fabled talents of Neil Cannon, Alison Osius, Jimmy Surette and others from my generation who’d made their mark developing climbs on the East Coast and upon New Hampshire granite in particular. I was excited to one day go and sample the atmosphere surrounding these spirited climbing achievements and taste for myself a bit of this much heralded region.

So when Lisa this year planned to go after the Masters Title on the Mt Washington Hill Climb in the White Mountains of Northern New Hampshire, I emailed Chiloe and he scheduled for us an opportunity to meet up for a day or two of climbing at Cathedral & Whitehorse Ledges in the White Mountains, wherein I could continue to chew into sand the shards of my own little stony goblet.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:13am PT
On the drive towards North Conway, which is the principal town servicing Mt Washington Valley, Lisa and I stopped briefly for some good late afternoon light and a taste of sweet air at Lake Chocorua:






The map from Ed Webster's guidebook:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:15am PT
From Ed Webster’s Rock Climbs in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, second edition:






Some particularly nice words quoted in Ed Webster’s Guide:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:18am PT
Cathedral’s Ledge’s tallest section of rock, The Prow, on the left:




Whitehorse Ledge, from across Echo Lake:




Cannon Cliff, located a bit northwest in Franconia Notch,
This cliff is 1000’ high. As it is that big, I guess they no longer call it just a “ledge”!


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:21am PT
Our chosen climb for day one at Cathedral Ledge would be a route up the central section of The Prow called Recompense, with the Beast Flake variant, a combo known as “RecomBeast”. All in all a worthy 5 pitch route with some nice spots of 5.9.

Here’s Chiloe & Eric havin’ a look see up at the route:




Chiloe, getting us up the long first pitch:






Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:22am PT
Eric coming up to join us on pitch 1:





Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:25am PT
After Eric valiantly toted the rope for us up the tenuous undercling entry leading up into pitch 2's Beast Flake, I took these shots of the boys negotiating the spooky step across of pitch 3:



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:27am PT
Eric following pitch 4’s tasty layback:








I think Chiloe has a few snapshots to help fill in the blanks...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:34am PT
...it is a beautiful place.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Jun 21, 2007 - 02:41am PT
great Tar... brings back fond memories.
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jun 21, 2007 - 02:44am PT
Very nice! And the kite flying bit....? Or was that hat flying?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:46am PT
Yes, well, you know Anders,
In a pinch the hat makes a great drag chute should speeds become excessive.
Brian

climber
Cali
Jun 21, 2007 - 02:48am PT
Thanks!

I just posted in the LA thread about how much I loved my two years in New England. Cathedral and Cannon are incredible crags, and the ice in New Hampshire and Vermont is not to be missed.

I think it is easy for West coast folks to look down on New England climbing (I did before I moved there, basically out of total ignorance). However, climbing in New England was, IMHO, incredible. Other than the lack of big mountains (a big problem for me) the crags back East can stand toe to toe with most of the places I've climbed in CA, UT, and CO. Plus, the community of climbers back there is pretty cool. Something about being crazy enough to climb in truly shitty weather, the kind of weather that would keep most folks out West indoors, breeds brotherhood (and/or sisterhood).

I've got too many memories to start listing routes, but Recombeast is a fine line. I hope you got to get on some other things as well (and hope the race went well).

Brian
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:56am PT
I think you are right about that stuff Brian.

And yes, thanks for asking, Lisa took first place in the Master's Division.

Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jun 21, 2007 - 03:07am PT
Well, I climbed at Rumney one cold spring day, and have snowshoed up Mt. Lafayette, right across from Cannon. (Before the face thingie fell off.) Just like here, climbers seem to adapt to what's on offer.

It was nice hiking up a mountain named for the Marquis. Lots of history to see in Boston, too.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 07:18am PT
Guidebooks, back stories and all -- it's a real TR! Especially because I know from the title he's only 1/3 done.

I'll get organized soon and post up how things looked through my camera. Some priceless shots of dude running out 5.9s in a cowboy hat. Only regret is I don't think we have photos of us kicking back with beers by the lake at day's end, talking over life, the fate of the cosmos and stuff.
goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Jun 21, 2007 - 07:38am PT
Cool beans, thanks for sharing.

stich

Trad climber
Denver, Colorado
Jun 21, 2007 - 07:45am PT
Awesome man. I was wondering how the trip was. Back in 2003 I went up there with my old woman around Halloween and took this ridiculous train ride to a pumpkin patch. It was quite beautiful with the Fall foliage, however. From the airplane it looked like nothing else I'd ever seen.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 07:51am PT
A. Crowley:
I'd love to climb there with you guys.

If your travels ever bring you out this way, send a note.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 08:32am PT
Some other perspectives from Cathedral Ledge last Friday:

Eric makes quick onsight work of the Beast Flake:




He’s belayed by this dude:




Finishing the tricky traverse pitch:




Wootles will know our bright rope.

Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 08:50am PT
Tarbuster contemplates the big Recompense corner:




And launches into a runout:




The corner goes on ....




One last crack to finish:




Tarbuster proves to be remarkably patient, answering questions from tourists at the top. In return, one of them takes this nice picture:




You can see that we had a fine day.
Maysho

climber
Truckee, CA
Jun 21, 2007 - 09:23am PT
Thanks for the super report Roy, Lisa kicks ass! Congrats to her. Great lungs, great smile.

The summer I turned 17, 1979, I drove from the Valley to N. Conway. Gave Ed Webster a ride from C. Springs to his folks house in Boston, then stayed with he and his buds in a chalet under Cathedral for the better part of July/August. We arrived in town one evening at the tailend of a bitter ethics meeting/debate that had riled up the community like a nest of hornets after being accidentally stepped on by a hapless climber. That summer Jimmy Dunn had put up The Arete 5.11a, and Cambre 510d, both single pitch lines off of the upper ledges with a few key bolts put in on rappel. My traveling companion/partner Leonard Coyne and I were steered onto the Arete for an early repeat. I found it spicy, vertical face climbing being a rare experience for my Valley climber self. The next day Paul Ross the british director of IME, chopped it! I was appalled and approached him on the road at the cliff base, when he waxed on about traditions and ethics, I told him this was just a scruffy little training crag for the grand climbs out west (Like Astroman and the W. Face El Cap, both of which we had dispensed with two weeks previously), what did a few bolts here and there matter? Neither of us had visualized what "sport climbing" might become at that point. Days later, Ed Webster stole Paul's bike and hung it way up on the Morder Wall, to add some levity to the seriousness of the scene.

Travelers from the west were rare and Leonard and I got a lot of attention as the next western visiters the season following the visit by Mark Hudon and Max Jones. At the time a few of the hardest pitches in the East had only been done by westerners, and we were seeking to succeed on the same climbs. I lucked out and pulled the third ascent and first onsight of the bouldery White Eye, 5th ascent of the Prow, and 5th of Supercrack in the Gunks. There is a photo in Edsters guidebook of doing Airation on a rest day. And I soloed Recombeast, seeing those photos of Chiloes, make my fingers drip, I remember being very disapointed when I got to that upper corner and found greasy little pocket jams rather than a secure splitter at the crux.

I loved it out there, and made some great friends. I am still in close touch with Bob Palais, and Ken Sims, and Alain Comeau's son and ex-wife Janot visited me this last spring for some skiing.

Whenever I drive up the Merced Canyon from El Portal, I look at all those dark scruffy walls on the right side and think about the 900 climbs that would exist, with the requisite guidebooks, culture, debates, and rich history if that zone were in New England.

Peter
james Colborn

Trad climber
Truckee, Ca
Jun 21, 2007 - 09:40am PT
I haven't been back to NH for ten+ years, thanks for sharing. The Webster guide is a great source for climbing history in that area. There is an account of the bike incident in websters guide that you are talking about Peter, great stuff. Peter you are one prolific dude.

Why aren't guide books small enough to fit in the top of day packs anymore?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 10:32am PT
Yes Maysho is quite prolific in his climbing pursuits and tagged a good deal of America's many seminal climbing destinations, all before he was 20!

The historical context of our vertical strivings is so rich. The social aspect of ascent contains a linguistic imperative which acts along with innovations in gear as a primary recorder and director of our strivings: informing, defining and shaping our goals.

All eras have their focus and stories. In the Golden Age free climbing was all about offwidth, primarily because the pitons were not wide enough to protect the terrain and wide cracks dictated mandatory free: in this case, the gear instructed the development of defining nomenclature such as arm bar, tight squeeze, flare, foot stacks and so forth. The stories drifting out about hard wide helped define what was possible and pointed to future goals; Crack of Fear, Crack of Doom, Hollow Flake. Chalk begot a language left as a physical mapping of the sequence which preceding climbers had worked out: a sort of hieroglyphic. Bolting, originally used only as a last resort, was governed by and seated in notions of boldness and environmental stewardship, so the tales of the early slab climbs encouraged a mindset of minimalism, tenacity and “leaving something intact” for future generations.

The developing language of ascent, the stories and “rules” and shifting focus all reflect a literate social norm, ever changing, which reports, instructs and points the way to the fashionable challenge of the day. We do what others are doing and talking about, through language we describe the past, eventually stretching the story to new levels and at interval effecting dramatic shifts in focus and the predominant terms then shift and morph to accomodate the prevalent mode and point the new way: finger lock, run out, stance drill, rap route, hang dog, sport climb, big wall free …

So after a fine introduction to the vocabulary of underclings, sloping holds, chimneys, laybacks, and fingerlocks of Cathedral Ledge, Chiloe and I bid farewell to Eric and quaffed a few beers at the local pub in North Conway, discussing the relevant historical characters, the climbers of the 60’s and 70’s.

On day two we ventured a couple classy steep slab pitches on Whitehorse, sampling the slab portion of Children’s Crusade: a ground up story all about steep edging, crimps, dikes, and mantles and stance driven bolts.

Chiloe might have some colorful pictures to help tell the story…
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 11:08am PT
And if your in Boulder, I've got those Flatirons dialed...
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 11:10am PT
Fall's a great season here. Let's talk it over a month or two in advance to work out when I'll be around.
snakefoot

climber
cali
Jun 21, 2007 - 12:02pm PT
damn i'm jealous, looks like a blast...congrats to your woman tar..
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 12:42pm PT
Tom, this oughtta look familiar to you.... Tar and I hit up Whitehorse the next day.

mooser

Trad climber
seattle
Jun 21, 2007 - 12:47pm PT
This is a great TR, Tarbuster! What a beautiful place, and a fun looking route. And your Stetson helmet is very cool. Not so good for rockfall, but very efficient at keeping spindrift out of your face, no doubt!
Russ Walling

Social climber
Out on the sand.... man.....
Jun 21, 2007 - 12:50pm PT
Hey! Way to go!
snakefoot

climber
cali
Jun 21, 2007 - 01:03pm PT
chiloe,
yes...looks like another day in paradise and a classic at that.
Rhodo-Router

Gym climber
Otto, NC
Jun 21, 2007 - 01:14pm PT
Long live the TR!

(ayup)
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 01:27pm PT
Well shoot, the rock quality and steep slab feel on Children’s Crusade is among the finest to be had.
This connoisseur stone, pristine & compact, presents high angle slab moves on flat cut edges:





Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 01:55pm PT






Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 02:04pm PT
Mooser:
And your Stetson helmet is very cool. Not so good for rockfall, but very efficient at keeping spindrift out of your face, no doubt!

Another cool thing about it ... see those overlaps I'm passing in the last two photos above? As I belayed at the top of this pitch, I could watch his hat moving up below the overhangs long before the rest of Tar came into view.
426

Sport climber
Buzzard Point, TN
Jun 21, 2007 - 02:07pm PT
Cool stuff gents.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 02:18pm PT
Sure, a cowboy hat might be a useful prop and dapper gag, a bit of functional decor,
But maybe I should start wearing one of Lisa's Mt Washington race trophies on my head...



The middle one might fit!
...this years 1st place Master's Champ, Go Lisa!
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 03:43pm PT
Naw, stick with the Cowboy hat, it's all you need. Leave the trophies for Lisa to wear proudly on her head.

It was cool having pizza with a houseful of hyperfit elite runners that evening ....

But for us riff-raff, Whitehorse had been pretty good fun.



goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Jun 21, 2007 - 03:52pm PT
^^^ Now THATS a stylin pic, the camera loves ya Roy.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 03:59pm PT
While Lisa was enjoyin' her laurels with her runnin' mates on Mt Wash,
Chiloe and I opted out of the beautiful overhung 5.11 tier higher up, in favor of a quick rappel to a swarthy bit of 5.8,
Followed by a couple ritual post climb beers out on a deck in the shade by a sunny, lilly pad topped, fish hoppin' lake.
(...and pizza too).




Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 04:04pm PT
Chiloe and I opted out of the beautiful 5.11 tier higher

As I recall you kept looking up at that pitch, while I mentioned many reasons we did not need to try it ... hadn't brought the RPs, wore the wrong color t shirts, etc. Some other day ....
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 04:25pm PT
Sometimes a fine line between a proper outing and an arse 'wuppin.
Wouldn't be right to cross that line and wind up with the latter, hehehe.

Thanks for some great routes Chiloe!
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 21, 2007 - 06:18pm PT
Great couple of days, not doubt about it. Here's my last shot from the last climb, Short Order on Whitehorse. So where are the kites?

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 06:47pm PT





Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Jun 21, 2007 - 07:42pm PT
Dang! even with that hat, it looks like a good time. congrats to all, esp Lisa!
slobmonster

Trad climber
berkeley, ca
Jun 21, 2007 - 07:55pm PT
Ahhh, pics from home. Thanks for making me smile.

Your fast partner (Lisa) very likely passed my former North Conway landlords, Steve & Sally Swenson (72 & 62 respectively) who also ran the road race last weekend.

Maysho, thanks for the personal perspective. Paul Ross might be inclined to know that bolts are still being chopped on Cathedral.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 11:05pm PT

A little more fun history from Ed Webster's guidebook to the White Mountains:







Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 11:10pm PT

Get get up to Cannon Cliff and snap off a few pitches:





Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 11:13pm PT
70's protagonists:






Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 11:17pm PT

80's Fellers:





Fluoride

Trad climber
Hollywood, CA
Jun 21, 2007 - 11:43pm PT
Great TR Roy! And congrats to the wife on her win.

I love that photo of page 484/Franconia Notch where the climbers are all wearing suits and hats. Gotta love the climbing clothing style of the 1930's. True gentlemen!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2007 - 11:52pm PT
I know, those dapper gents are pretty cool huh Fluoride.
Thanks for kudos to Lisa, I'll tell her straight away!
stich

Trad climber
Denver, Colorado
Jun 22, 2007 - 12:00am PT
Send my congrats to Lisa as well, Tar. I was just showing Tracy this thread earlier in the day when she came by to pick up her rack. She mentioned Lisa was looking hot, too. Of course your hat wearing profile again got praise.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 22, 2007 - 09:11am PT
Of course your hat wearing profile again got praise.

Found one more.

Michael Hjorth

Trad climber
Copenhagen, Denmark
Jun 22, 2007 - 09:29am PT
Hi Chiloe,

Somewhat better rock at your place than the rock you climbed at "my place" in Sweden recently, eh?!

Fantastic TR!

Maybe I should book myself a flight ...

Michael
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 22, 2007 - 10:18am PT
Michael Hjorth:
Somewhat better rock at your place than the rock you climbed at "my place" in Sweden recently, eh?!

Better rock but no sea below us, both places were great fun. I'd go back to Kullen in a flash.


Maybe I should book myself a flight ...

Icelandair CPH/KEF/BOS not too pricey. The cliffs wait ....

I can't claim our weather always looks like that, though!
Jimmy S

climber
Granite State
Jun 22, 2007 - 10:47am PT
Nice pics Roy. Here's another.

Dana "Mad Dog" Drummond on Tourist Treat, Cathedral
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 22, 2007 - 10:57am PT
Howdy Jimmy,
Nice pic yourself and welcome to the madness! I bet that you have a couple more kicking around for show and tell. Any shots of Hugh on Stage Fright? Love that little tale of persistence.
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Jun 22, 2007 - 10:58am PT
Damm Tar...now I have to scan some old shots from the 70's from North Conway. Great place, great climbers and hard routes. Congrats to Lisa.



Jimmy S...Bob D here...Long time no see. How are you? Hope all is well.

Later, Bob
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2007 - 11:09am PT
Jimmy!
'Haven't seen you in a coon's age.
Where you living these days?
How's it going, still involved in making films?

Welcome to the Taco Stand.
Cheers,
Roy

Yes Bob, please heat up that scanner and dish us up some North Conway jewels...
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 22, 2007 - 11:26am PT
Tar, does your guidebook have that picture of Jimmy climbing Liquid Sky above the Space Platform (or maybe Jim has some real photos). That was historic.
Brian Boyd

Trad climber
Scottsdale, AZ
Jun 22, 2007 - 11:52am PT
The Zonkers photo was taken by Albert Dow. Here is a shot of Albert on Layton's Ascent in the late 70s:



Albert died in an avalanche on Mt. Washington in '82 while on search and rescue. He was a great guy, and it's hard to believe he's been gone for 25 years.

The photo of Jimmy Dunn is noteworthy because he had some interesting footwear choices during those years: You notice that he's missing a left shoe on Zonkers. He did the FA of a route called Dresden (5.10) barefoot, but the trend never caught on.

I was watching Dunn work on the FA of White Eye (5.12). There was a key move that had a great hold just out of reach. He came down off the route, drove back into town, and returned with a pair of mountain boots. He put the mountain boot over one of his EBs, and proceeded to dance up thin moves wearing this massive boot. With the extra reach, Jummy made it to the jug. He then hung by one hand, unlaced the boot, and kicked it off into space. He worked through this sequence several times, with people chanting "eject, eject" as the boot launched. This was in '78, I think. Mark Hudon and Max Jones made the second free ascent, notably bootless.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2007 - 12:12pm PT
RIP Albert.

Great stories Brian,
Ed does describe some of that stuff in his guide.






Thanks again to Chiloe for hosting the climbing activities on this trip!



...Now let's kick in some more good New Hampshire granite stories and pics kids and pump up the Taco Stand!
Brian Boyd

Trad climber
Scottsdale, AZ
Jun 22, 2007 - 12:49pm PT
Cover of the first Webster guide. Frank Vernooy on the Bridge of Khazad-Dum at Cathedral Ledge:



Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 22, 2007 - 01:34pm PT
A brief story about Albert Dow:

http://pubpages.unh.edu/~lch/albert_dow.htm
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2007 - 01:52pm PT
Nice little vignette there Larry.
It taps the essence and feeling of pulling through to the top.
Mike.

climber
Jun 22, 2007 - 04:29pm PT
Thanks for the sweet pix (and tellin'), Roy and all.
Jennie

Trad climber
Salt Lake
Jun 22, 2007 - 05:48pm PT
Great report!
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Jun 22, 2007 - 11:07pm PT
first rate stuff - really neat climbing and cool history stuff - thanks Roy!
divad

Trad climber
wmass
Jun 24, 2007 - 09:11am PT
Tarbuster, Nice TR and congrats to Lisa. My son and I drove Jonathan Wyatt from Boston to North Conway on Wed. before the race, had lunch with him and Anna Pichrtova, then went to Cathedral and got in a couple of climbs. My son finished 36th overall on Sat. He gained entry in the race by giving Jon a ride up.
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Jun 24, 2007 - 10:14am PT
Another historical note. In the 1982 edition of his guidebook, Ed Webster writes about Children's Crusade, "Of all the recently climbed routes in New Hampshire, this is probably the finest and most elegant." Al Comeau & Mike Heinz first climbed the initial leads in 1978. I don't have a photo of them but here's another North Conway legend, Jimmy Dunn, leading Children's Crusade in 1980. The bolts got fatter but otherwise the route Tar and I climbed last Saturday seems to have changed hardly at all.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 24, 2007 - 10:46am PT
'Glad everyone is enjoying the thread!

Divad: Lisa and I stayed with Marianne in Madison, where J Wyatt (congrats on your win Mr Wyatt!) & Anna P collected for an afterparty. Marianne was an excellent host, is a big enthusiast of the hill climb and loves to support the elite runners by offering her house. Anna is such a little doll, sweet, friendly and a real champion. Sounds like you and your son had a similar few days to ours; you've got some nice crags and some real steep hills...

Jimmy Dunn is a real amazing character and you have a nice athletic shot of him there Chiloe.

divad

Trad climber
wmass
Jun 24, 2007 - 01:30pm PT
Tarbuster, Yeah, Anna is a real sweety. On the drive up I asked Jon where he was coming from last and he said he flew in from Italy, where he lives in the Dolomites with his girlfriend, an Italian Olympic x-c skier. I told him I'd been there and it was my favorite place. He invited me to stay at his house the next time I'm there. Zowie!
Jimmy S

climber
Granite State
Jun 25, 2007 - 10:27am PT
Steve, Bob, Roy,
Thanks for the welcome to the "Stand". I am living back in North Conway once again.
To bad I missed you Roy. I saw this guy out on the cliff with a cowboy hat, but it was from far away and I didn't recognize you.
Carry on,
Jim
Maysho

climber
Truckee, CA
Jun 25, 2007 - 10:33am PT
Howdy Jimmy and Welcome! Are you still working as a cameraman?

Peter
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