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Plan B

Ice climber
Agua Dulce,CA
Mar 27, 2014 - 08:51pm PT
Thanks Reilly! The plain ones get me.

Love the owl Bob!
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Mar 27, 2014 - 09:11pm PT
Hope you make it PlanB! Should be a fun day of birding and companionship.
john hansen

climber
Mar 27, 2014 - 10:25pm PT
Saw these guys about an hour ago flying fast in a group down Elkhorn Slough.

I am thinking Bonapart's gull. Much smaller and faster then all the other regular gulls. What you think?

Credit: john hansen

EDIT: Thanks z.
little Z

Trad climber
un cafetal en Naranjo
Mar 27, 2014 - 10:43pm PT
John, you nailed it
john hansen

climber
Mar 28, 2014 - 12:41am PT
The Merganser Tri-fecta in 5 days.


These are all really bad photo's from long range, but they work for ID.

Common. He was floating by fast on the Merced by Fern Springs.

Credit: john hansen

Hooded. He was way off shore on Tahoe


Credit: john hansen

And Red Breasted was at least 200 yards away


I only have a 400 mil lens but it really help's with ID at a long distance.


Credit: john hansen







Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 28, 2014 - 12:53am PT
OK, girls, get yer Berkut on!
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


Mongolian girls becoming eagle hunters to help keep ancient tradition alive

Ashol Pan, 13, takes to centuries-old pastime that has been dominated by men

March 27, 2014 by David Strege

Eagle hunter Ashol Pan of Mongolia lets go of her golden eagle.
Eagle hunter Ashol Pan of Mongolia lets go of her golden eagle.
Credit: Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News Agency, used by permission

A photographer seeking to document the next generation of Kazakh eagle hunters in Mongolia discovered a 13-year-old girl who has taken to the male-dominated tradition.

Photographer Asher Svidensky made a four-month trek through western Mongolia, mostly on horseback, and found Han Gohadok and his daughter, Ashol Pan, who had expressed a desire to take up the full-time profession that is centuries old.

Good thing, too, since the ancient pastime is said to be a dying part of Mongolian culture, as young men are leaving their families and the hunting duties behind. As a result, more girls are becoming eagle hunters to replace their brothers, according to the Mail Online.

Gohadok told the Mail Online that his eldest son was to become the eagle hunter of the family but was drafted into the army. That’s when Ashol Pan stepped forward.

Eagle hunter Ashol Pan of Mongolia holds her golden eagle, giving pers...
Eagle hunter Ashol Pan of Mongolia holds her golden eagle, giving perspective on the size of the bird.
Credit: Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News Agency, used by permission

Eagle hunters use golden eagles to hunt foxes during the winter months when the gold-colored foxes stand out against the snow. They also hunt hares. Typically, the training of young men begins at age 13, when they are strong enough to carry a full-grown eagle on their arm.

The training is rigorous, as the master and its eagle develop a long-term and trusting relationship that is all consuming. The Kazakh custom is for the eagle hunter to ride a horse while hunting.

Svidensky was looking for something different when he set out to document eagle hunters in Mongolia.

“I decided to focus myself—stop looking for a portrait of a centuries-old image of a Kazakh eagle hunter and instead represent the future of this ancient Mongolian tradition,” Svidensky told the Mail Online.

Ashol Pan represents the future. She is one of an estimated 250 eagle hunters in western Mongolia.

In his photos, Svidensky depicts the evident joy Ashol Pan has in her new role, one her father never would have forced upon her unless she had asked. And she did.

Eagle hunter Ashol Pan of Mongolia gets an eagle-pat on the head.
Eagle hunter Ashol Pan of Mongolia gets an eagle-pat on the head.
Credit: Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News Agency, used by permission

Kazakh Eagle Huntress

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

I feel like I wasted my childhood.
john hansen

climber
Mar 28, 2014 - 01:07am PT
That is one really cool big bird...
Mike Bolte

Trad climber
Planet Earth
Mar 28, 2014 - 01:26am PT
From Santa cruz the last week, all are clickable for larger versions.

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Credit: Mike Bolte
Snowy
Snowy
Credit: Mike Bolte
Red-breasted merganser with a big lunch
Red-breasted merganser with a big lunch
Credit: Mike Bolte
White Pelicans group feeding
White Pelicans group feeding
Credit: Mike Bolte
white Pelican
white Pelican
Credit: Mike Bolte
Osprey
Osprey
Credit: Mike Bolte
Harrier
Harrier
Credit: Mike Bolte
scuffy b

climber
heading slowly NNW
Mar 28, 2014 - 12:08pm PT
WOW those are great!
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 28, 2014 - 01:28pm PT
Great shots Mike.


On my walk this AM with my pup Eva the winds were around 30-40 MPH. This fellow was just hugging the tree and sleeping. Really beautiful birds. Look at the size of his talons.

Credit: Bob D'A

Great stuff Reilly, saw two golden's yesterday. Really stunning birds.

Credit: Bob D'A
moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 28, 2014 - 05:52pm PT
"Is Your Toddler as Smart as a Crow? No"

High order ideas like water displacement and tool manufacturing aren't beyond the reach of one very smart bird. The skills of the New Caledonian crow reveal just how complex animal brains can be.

In the new study, the investigators used a set of tasks in which six wild crows had to drop different objects into water-filled tubes to make a floating treat—a cube of meat—rise within reach. The question: Did they understand the principles of water displacement well enough to get the treat?

The first five tasks tested the crows’ understanding that dropping objects into a sand-filled tube doesn’t bring the treat within reach, while dropping them in water does; whether, given the choice between dropping objects that sank or floated, or were solid or porous, they’d figure out which got them the treats fastest; and whether they could recognize that different water levels and tube widths presented better or worse options for getting what they were after.

The final task involved a bit of trickery that even young children don’t always understand. Three water-filled tubes protrude from a table top, but under the table’s surface, two of them are connected by a pipe. A treat in the central tube—which is too narrow for the displacement objects—can be reached only by dropping objects into the tube that’s connected. In one prior study using this task, most eight-year-old children succeeded, but not, in most cases, because they inferred the existence of the secret connector. Rather, they simply learned through experimentation that dropping objects in the connected tube got them to their goal. Eurasian jays given the same task fail, even though they succeed at other tasks involving volume.

The crows flew through the first few tasks easily. They grasped the sand task and the floating versus sinking principles as quickly as 5-7 year-old children do, and, notably, seemed to realize that not all sinking objects are equal; in the porous versus solid task, they favored the solid objects, which displaced more water. Confronted with narrow and wide tubes with more water in the wide tube, they used the one with more water to achieve their goal. But when both had the same amount of water, they usually just kept dropping objects into a given tube until they got a snack, showing no sense that one might get them the treat faster. In the central tube conundrum, they never figured out how to get the treat to come into reach.

These are tantalizing signs that the crows do understand how volume displacement works, but that their understanding is fairly rigid. It may be that the crows focus on the properties of the objects they’re dropping in the water, while tube width and how that affects water level is Greek to them. Their response to the central tube task, in turn, reveals that as with jays, their understanding of the basics of how the world should work, quite useful in more straightforward situations, might fail them when things take an unexpected turn. The study used only a few crows, so there’s plenty more work to be done to confirm and expand on these results. But it’s an interesting glimpse of where the limits of New Caledonian crows’ understanding lies, and is another step along our exploration of the largely unmapped world of the animal mind."

http://time.com/42068/crows-intelligence-animals/

Pretty cool!

Andrzej

Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Mar 29, 2014 - 01:00am PT
To be clear (due to an error in a previous post) - birders will meet at the South Coast Botanical Gardens at 8:30am (not 7:30am) tomorrow, Saturday, March 29th.

Looking forward to seeing everyone!
Mike Bolte

Trad climber
Planet Earth
Mar 29, 2014 - 01:17am PT
Birdapalooza folks - have fun!

a couple from today

Western Bluebird
Western Bluebird
Credit: Mike Bolte
Brown Creeper
Brown Creeper
Credit: Mike Bolte
Wilson's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Credit: Mike Bolte
Harrier dropping in for lunch
Harrier dropping in for lunch
Credit: Mike Bolte
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Mar 29, 2014 - 01:27am PT
Beautiful shot of the creeper Mike
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Mar 29, 2014 - 10:14pm PT
Gorgeous birds Mike. Love the Wilson's.

Birdapalooza day one was great fun. Many lifers were had. Good fun. Tomorrow we meet at the LA arboretum at 8:30-9:00am. See you there....photos to follow....
john hansen

climber
Mar 29, 2014 - 10:33pm PT
Looking forward to all the photo's Crimpie.

Here are some That I took over the last few days.

Savannah Sparrow (I think)

Credit: john hansen


Peregrine Falcon

Credit: john hansen

Eared Grebe

Credit: john hansen


Common Loon

Credit: john hansen

Titmouse

Credit: john hansen

Could use some help on this one, probably simple ,but hard for me in the dull winter look. Long billed Dowitcher maybe?? Bill seems too short, maybe it got broken off. Or maybe Short Billed.. The end of the bill looks weird.

Credit: john hansen


LB Curlew
Credit: john hansen
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 30, 2014 - 02:25pm PT
Great shot Mike & John.

John I think it is a Short Billed Dowitcher.

Here a few from today.

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Mar 30, 2014 - 05:44pm PT
I went to Don Edwards Wildlife Refuge today (south end of SF Bay) and saw these dudes:

American Avocet
Black Necked Stilt
Canada Goose
California Gull
Northern Shoveler
American White Pelican
Snowy Egret
Red-Winged Blackbird (over by the sewer treatment area while driving back, not on the bay side)
Song Sparrow
White Crowned Sparrow
Western Tanager
Ruddy Duck
American Coot
Barn Swallow

Maybe I'll load a few pics later. Got some nice shots of the Barn Swallows sitting on a fence post.
NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Mar 30, 2014 - 05:51pm PT
Bob DA, your sbd is a Killdeer
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Mar 30, 2014 - 08:07pm PT
Good day at the LA Arboretum.

Thanks to Dee ee, 10b4me, PlanB and BrassNuts for a fun day two of Birdapalooza.

The bird of the day was a Calliope Hummingbird. We saw a second after Dee ee had to take off.

Next time out - we think a pelagic trip and OC birding!

I don't have access to photos right now. Some should be forthcoming.
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