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Messages 4901 - 4920 of total 7423 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
10b4me

Ice climber
Soon 2B Arizona
May 28, 2013 - 06:27pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#304850
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
May 28, 2013 - 10:12pm PT
A few more from Colombia. Dirt...that is a very amazing shot.

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A
john hansen

climber
May 28, 2013 - 10:44pm PT
Never posted this because of the branch. But got his one in Sabino Canyon outside Tucson. Peterson's guide show this within the Northern Cardinals range.

I was hoping for a Pyrrhuloxia too. No luck.

Cardinals have been released in Hawaii so I see them all the time but this one was a first on the mainland.



Credit: john hansen
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 29, 2013 - 01:01am PT
I'm bumping this so my next post gets top billing, as it should.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 29, 2013 - 01:03am PT
Pot Farmers' Pesticides Killing Spotted and Barred Owls

GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) In the West Coast marijuana-growing region known as the Emerald Triangle, scientists want to know whether the rat poison spread around illegal pot plantations is killing northern spotted owls, a threatened species.

But because it is so rare to find a spotted owl dead in the forest, they will be looking at an invasive cousin owl from the East that has been pushing spotted owls out of their territory since the 1990s.

Mourad Gabriel, a doctoral candidate at the University of California at Davis Veterinary Genetics Laboratory, said Tuesday they are testing 84 barred owls from Northern California killed in the course of research on whether removing them allows spotted owls to reclaim lost territories. Those owls were collected primarily by the California Academy of Sciences and Green Diamond Resource Company, which grows redwood for timber.

Among the first roughly 10 barred owls tested, about half have been positive for the poison. Two spotted owls found dead in Mendocino County in Northern California also tested positive for the poisons, Gabriel said.

The research is funded primarily by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Eric Forsman, a U.S. Forest Service wildlife biologist and a leading expert on spotted owls, said he did not think the rat poisons would be a significant factor for spotted owls in northern Oregon and Washington, where their primary prey is the flying squirrel and there aren't as many illegal pot plantations on federal lands. Loss of old growth forest habitat and the invasion of the barred owl remain the primary threat to the birds, whose numbers continue to decline.

The rat poison could be significant, however, in the southern part of their range Northern California and southwestern Oregon where they feed primarily on dusky-footed wood rats and pot plantations are abundant, Forsman said.

Spotted owls in southern Oregon and Northern California have been declining at the rate of 5 percent to 15 percent a year from 1990 to 2008, Fish and Wildlife said.

Scientists have already established that common household rat poisons spread around illegal pot gardens to keep rats from eating the plants have been poisoning fishers, a large cousin of the weasel that is being considered for protection by the Endangered Species Act. One of the threats to the fishers being analyzed is the poison at the pot gardens, which are common on federal and tribal lands in Northern California and Southern Oregon, the prime pot-growing region known as the Emerald Triangle.

Garbriel said researchers hoped to expand the testing of dead owls once Fish and Wildlife Service approves a program to experimentally remove barred owls from spotted owl territories on federal and tribal lands.

Fish and Wildlife has been considering the issue for years, and completion of an environmental impact statement has repeatedly been pushed back. The latest estimate is that it will be done by end of summer.

One of the proposed test sites is the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Northern California, where much of the work on fishers and rat poison has been done.

Gabriel said spotted owls may turn out to be more susceptible to the poisons than the barred owls, because they focus on eating rodents, while barred owls will eat a wide range of prey, such as snails and crawdads.

The tribe has received a $200,000 grant from Fish and Wildlife to work on the issue of rat poisons and wildlife. The money will go to cleaning up as many as five pot plantations identified on the reservation, testing the soils, and prey species such as snails, crawdads and wood rats for rat poison, and testing barred owls that are killed in the removal experiment, said J. Mark Higley, a wildlife biologist for the Hoopa tribe.
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 29, 2013 - 01:37am PT
Damn, 5% to 15% a year. I don't like those numbers. In 10 years that's 50% to.....extinction.
10b4me

Ice climber
Soon 2B Arizona
May 29, 2013 - 01:49am PT
I wonder what the rate is today?
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
May 29, 2013 - 12:01pm PT
Good article Reilly, hope this issue can get resolved before it's too late.
That is a crazy shot Bob, definitely not my doing of course.
This is a little more my material right here.........
Epic, blurry shot of Hummingbirds
Epic, blurry shot of Hummingbirds
Credit: dirt claud
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
May 29, 2013 - 06:16pm PT
A few from my walk today.

Song Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Credit: Bob D'A

Western Wood Pewee
Western Wood Pewee
Credit: Bob D'A

Lark Sparrow.
Lark Sparrow.
Credit: Bob D'A
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
May 29, 2013 - 07:33pm PT
A little birdie in a brown UPS outfit delivered this to the house today. A big surprise and one that has me dreaming of a trip!

Thanks Dropline! It is really a cool surprise and it made my day!

Apologies for the quality of the photo. THIS is why I don't post my own photos here. :)


A birdy surprise!
A birdy surprise!
Credit: Crimpergirl
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 29, 2013 - 11:07pm PT
Here are a couple from my ongoing "Search For The Blue Grosbeak."
(today)

Credit: dee ee

Credit: dee ee

Credit: dee ee
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
May 29, 2013 - 11:35pm PT
Ducks. But you will love this. <3

http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/dont-be-sad-look-at-these-baby-ducks
BrassNuts

Trad climber
Save your a_s, reach for the brass...
May 30, 2013 - 12:10am PT
AZ bird bump
Bridled Titmouse
Bridled Titmouse
Credit: BrassNuts
Pine Siskin
Pine Siskin
Credit: BrassNuts
Hummer onanest
Hummer onanest
Credit: BrassNuts
Hummer notonanest
Hummer notonanest
Credit: BrassNuts
Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat
Credit: BrassNuts
Another Hummer on a nest, with a bug, ready to feed the tiny babies in...
Another Hummer on a nest, with a bug, ready to feed the tiny babies inside the nest
Credit: BrassNuts
Bill Mc Kirgan

Trad climber
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
May 30, 2013 - 01:04am PT
This adorable bird dances to the Gangnam Style on the FB


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=634424569920935

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=634424569920935

Credit: FB screen shot

Is it just me, or does anyone else hear, 'Open Canister' when listening to this song?
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
May 30, 2013 - 01:21pm PT
Credit: dirt claud
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
May 30, 2013 - 04:40pm PT
WHEE HOO!!! "THE SEARCH FOR THE BLUE GROSBEAK" is over.

Credit: dee ee

dirt claud, are those two in love?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 30, 2013 - 07:35pm PT
BN, did you figure out the hummer on the nest?
Great shots!

Dee, where was the little blue guy?

DC, where in the world do you find those crazy pics?



Boid trivia:

In 2012 B95, an individual Red Knot, became famous as the oldest known
surviving member of the declining pop of Red Knots which migrates from N Canada
to Tierra del Fuego. B95 was first banded in 1995 and has been seen several
times since. He has gained the name of "Moonbird" because in 18 years of
migrating he has flown farther than the distance to the moon!

And all on a diet of bugs! So there!
TMJesse

Mountain climber
Olympia, WA
May 30, 2013 - 09:49pm PT
Saw several Canada geese headed south today. And, a great blue heron just flew by outside our window.
BrassNuts

Trad climber
Save your a_s, reach for the brass...
May 30, 2013 - 11:12pm PT
Reilly - I think both hummers on the nests are female Broad-Tailed hummers... Cute little guys, hard to spot but luckily we had help finding them, so tiny! Blue Grosbeak - cool! We saw a female Rose-Breasted this morning along with a McGillvary's Warbler and a Virginia Warbler, then it was time to race to the excitement of the cube farm :-p Keep up the fun pix everyone!
john hansen

climber
May 30, 2013 - 11:15pm PT
Been trying to figure out what this one was for a while. I see above in BN's post that it is a pine sisken.

Another bird to add to the trip total.

Madera Canyon Arizona




Credit: john hansen
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