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Messages 3921 - 3940 of total 7005 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Oct 28, 2012 - 07:02pm PT
Two new 5.11's in the San Luis Valley plus some great birds. The Sandhill cranes are back.

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A

Credit: Bob D'A
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Oct 28, 2012 - 09:18pm PT

Here are a couple of ones that would have been new for me for the STBY, but I had a cold and drove.
*And I had to have help from Tony to identify the "peep". * thanks.

From Discovery Park/ West Point Seattle.

Credit: Darwin

Credit: Darwin


Credit: Darwin


ps in edit: I don't think either of them is real common in Seattle.
Tony

Trad climber
Pt. Richmond, CA
Oct 29, 2012 - 12:02am PT
Here's an interesting tidbit about Black Swifts. The species account in the book ""Birds of Yosemite and the East Slope" by David Gaines (Mono Lake Committee founder) and Keith Hansen, mentions the work of Charles Michael who was an early solo explorer of "inaccessible" points in Yosemite and elsewhere, and after whom Michael Minaret was named. He and his wife Enid chronicled species of birds and plants in the Valley. It seems their solo climbing was crucial for documenting this bird species.

Ledges on sheer, well-shaded cliffs, often behind waterfalls, cradle Yosemite's Black Swifts. From their misty nesting habitats, these shadowy scimitars range far and wide, materializing over meadows, forests, lakes and even mountain peaks. In late July and August, when parental cares are probably past, flocks of over 30 have buzzed the summits of Mt. Conness (12,600 '-MC), Mt. Dana (13,100'-JH) and the Dana Plateau (11,700'-DG).
The ruggedness and inaccessibility of the Black Swifts' breeding haunts have defeated nearly everyone who has sought their nests. Not so Yosemite postmaster Charles Michael, who not only located seven nests in Tenaya Canyon (approx. 6000') in the 1920s, but also secured excellent photographs of nestlings. "It was the wild, erratic winging of a lone Black Swift," he wrote, "that first attracted my attention. Such bewildering speed, such coordination of mind and muscle... Somehow the thought came to me of a great winged spider gone mad... While I watched, the bird suddenly swooped and fairly seemed to plaster himself to the wall not fifty feet from where I stood... The nest site was in one of the most inaccessible sections of a gorge as grand as any in all the Sierra".
"The nest was composed of the delicate pinnae of the five-fingered fern. Great banks of these ferns hung from neighboring walls, and it would be quite possible for the swifts to procure material while on the wing. Perhaps, though, the swifts may gather nesting material while clinging to a wall, as I have often seen swifts alight on a ferny ledge above Vernal Pall... The nest was placed on a bit of projecting rock ...located within the shelter of an overhung wall, thirty feet directly above a deep pool in the creek. The inner chasm is here very narrow; the vertical walls stand not fifty feet apart. The channel is dark and cool; in the long summer days the sun lights its depth for but a brief hour. And at no time or season does the sun ever play on the nest of the swift-cramped quarters, I should say, for birds of the wide skies" (Michael 1927).

Credit: Tony

Credit: Tony
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Oct 29, 2012 - 09:59am PT
In Big Pine on Sat.


Tony

Trad climber
Pt. Richmond, CA
Oct 29, 2012 - 12:17pm PT
little z,

Embarrassingly, I somehow missed your post before I post. Thanks for the links. The longer one describing the exploits of the people searching for nests is quite compelling. Fortunately, egg collecting has essentially ended.

Also, about your Costa Rica list. Wow! How long have you lived there?

dee ee,
We saw a smaller flock of White Pelicans south of Lone Pine the previous week, too.
Tony

Trad climber
Pt. Richmond, CA
Oct 30, 2012 - 04:53pm PT
Some new birds have shown up for the winter around here. I had hoped that a Rock Wren might be a possibility in the rocky hills behind us, I hadn't considered one showing up along the water in the riprap. I found one there and it has been around for at least 5 days.
Credit: Tony

It seems to be pretty tolerant of all the human and dog activity in the park, so it might even stay for the winter. Of course, it is pretty good at quickly disappearing into the rocks.
Credit: Tony

Here is a White-throated Sparrow that appears to be one of at least 2-3 individuals around here.
Credit: Tony

In the fading light, I finally saw a Sora that I had heard a few times previously. Here is a blurry shot take at ISO 3200.
Credit: Tony

I was also delighted to see that the 2 young Otters that were reared in the same pond are still around. I don't know if their mom has moved on.
Credit: Tony

I also went to check out a Tufted Duck at Lake Merritt in downtown Oakland. This is presumably the same bird that has been showing up since at least since 2007.
Credit: Tony

Credit: Tony
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Oct 31, 2012 - 12:02pm PT
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Oct 31, 2012 - 12:09pm PT
Great stuff Tony. A few Evening Grosbeak shots from this morning. Really beautiful birds.

Credit: Bob D'A


Credit: Bob D'A

This Flicker also made a short appearance.

Credit: Bob D'A
cyndiebransford

climber
31 years in Joshua Tree, now Alaska
Oct 31, 2012 - 08:29pm PT
Finally got a shot of the male Pine Grosbeak. He is more flighty than the female.
male Pine Grosbeak
male Pine Grosbeak
Credit: cyndiebransford
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Oct 31, 2012 - 09:34pm PT
Nice Cyndie..great looking birds.


I'm hoping to see a yellow Grosbeak when I'm in Mexico in a week.
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Oct 31, 2012 - 11:01pm PT
What Bob said about the Pine Grosbeak. Bob; where are you going in Mexico, and are you climbing?

Cyndie; Do you think McKay's buntings will show up at your pad?

Darwin
cyndiebransford

climber
31 years in Joshua Tree, now Alaska
Nov 1, 2012 - 11:32am PT
I saw McKay's Buntings last year, not at my house but at my local birding area about 5 miles away. They should return again.
Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Nov 1, 2012 - 12:04pm PT
Darwin...driving down into Copper Canyon to Urique and some other villages. Should be fun.
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Nov 2, 2012 - 08:57am PT
The soap opera of bird life:

Passerine extrapair mating dynamics: A Bayesian modeling ...

One striking paradigm shift in the study of avian mating dynamics has been the realization that monogamy in bird species is not the rule (Lack 1968) but the exception (e.g.,Griffith et al. 2002). Many broods consist not only of off-spring sired by the social father (the male providing care)but also of extrapair young (EPY) sired by a male who has engaged in one or more extrapair copulations (EPCs) with the focal female but provides no care for her offspring.Variation in the frequency of EPY is dramatic, varying from species without any EPY to species where,on average,almost 80% of offspring are EPY (Griffith et al. 2002). The current consensus explanation of this variation recognizes a hier-archy of processes affecting the probability of producing EPY (WestneatandSherman1997;ArnoldandOwens2002;Bennett and Owens 2002; Griffith et al. 2002; Westneat and Stewart 2003). Differences across species are probably due to differences in the division of parental care and in the cost scenario (for both parents) that unfolds when an EPYis produced (Mulder et al. 1994; Birkhead and Møller 1996;Gowaty 1996; Møller 2000; Møller and Cuervo 2000). An EPY entails costs to the social father when he provides care for an unrelated offspring, and he may therefore reduce his care or stop caring for the brood altogether, which will have repercussions for the female. Life history (especially longevity) probably plays an important role in mediating such costs, because the social male is more likely to desert a brood in case of uncertainty in paternity in long-lived species than in short-lived species (e.g., Mauck et al. 1999).

http://www.academia.edu/1925702/Passerine_extrapair_mating_dynamics_A_Bayesian_modeling_approach_comparing_four_species

Basic evolutionary rules for pair bonded species:

1. Find the best mate.

2. Also find the best genes outside of your pair bond to mate with.
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 3, 2012 - 10:22pm PT
It's been a busy week: lots of birds especially at the feeder, but the light in Seattle recently has been somewhat suboptimal, like 24hrs a day.


First the Nothern Shrike.

Credit: Darwin
and
Credit: Darwin
I was pleased as punch to get these photos given the light, but then I spoke to one our local "real bird photographers", and he apparently has a couple with prey (insects and "Wee, sleekit, cow'rin, tim'rous beastie, ", aka mouse. Any they were probably sharp, too.


Then, there is what I think is a Mallard/Shoveler hybrid, but I am open to all suggestions. It was hanging with Mallards.

Credit: Darwin

Credit: Darwin

Finally some feeder shots:
Credit: Darwin

Credit: Darwin

Credit: Darwin
Mike Bolte

Trad climber
Planet Earth
Nov 3, 2012 - 10:53pm PT
Some good ones back there tony, Bob, Darwin and Cyndie! I like the White-throated sparrow and pine grosbeak.

From this weekend:

I keep taking photos of Anna's HBs! &#40;click for larger&#41;
I keep taking photos of Anna's HBs! (click for larger)
Credit: Mike Bolte
Spotted Towhee - check out those feet
Spotted Towhee - check out those feet
Credit: Mike Bolte
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Credit: Mike Bolte
Red-breasted nuthatch
Red-breasted nuthatch
Credit: Mike Bolte
Pygmy nuthatch
Pygmy nuthatch
Credit: Mike Bolte
Credit: Mike Bolte
Loggerhead Shrike
Loggerhead Shrike
Credit: Mike Bolte
Red-breasted Sapsucker. First one I have ever seen.
Red-breasted Sapsucker. First one I have ever seen.
Credit: Mike Bolte
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Nov 3, 2012 - 11:16pm PT
Mike, great shot of the Pygmy!

I had a great time Friday leading a visiting English birder around. About
six months ago I came across a website called birdingpal.org. I signed up
and forgot about it. Then this guy emailed me. It was great despite having
a common language that divides us. He has birded seriously in the Lower
Rio Grand area so I was only able to find him about six or seven firsts to
add to his worldwide* total of almost 2000! But he was happy to get them.
It turns out I actually have some Europeans he doesn't! HA! ;-)

*Europe, N America, Gambia, S. Africa, Nepal, India...
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 4, 2012 - 06:09am PT


Nice Mike. Kind of like mine only better. ;-)


Anyone have an idea on my "Shoveler/Mallard hybrid"?
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Nov 4, 2012 - 06:45am PT
Been SWAMPED with work and haven't been able to visit as much as I like. Sure missed seeing all this great stuff! Makes my day -
little Z

Trad climber
un cafetal en Naranjo
Nov 4, 2012 - 09:38am PT
Hi Darwin,

cool Northern Shrike, a nice find.

your duck is a domestic Mallard, they often show big patches of white like that. Structurally there are no signs of hybridization, pure Mallard, but from domestic stock.

thanks for posting the great photos.
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