Classic Ice Primer- Chouinard Catalog 1968

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Messages 621 - 634 of total 634 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 13, 2019 - 10:41pm PT
I aver that bamboo is more stable in the shrinkage department.

I can also attest that bamboo plywood rapidly shrinks yer wallet!

Problem now 40 years on is the laminated bamboo is falling apart as the glue is releasing. It has also be susceptible to moisture absorption at the metal joints and in the lamination itself. Working laminated bamboo I suspect was a bit of a bitch when layers blew apart fitting that tangs at the head. Which is why we always saw a good bit of wood putty used to fill the gaps there.

Shaft material price is the reason I think it was the rookie's @ Camp/Interalp that built the ash handled tools. Bamboo went to the best in the shop.

Ha ha. We fell all over ourselves trying to make the ID.

got a chuckle from that Tar...I just did the same a few minutes ago!
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 14, 2019 - 11:03am PT
Going through some old photos. 1973 I think, and likely posted prior some time back. Here all decked out in wool with piolet and alpine hammer. Memorable because the sun had just gone down and temps were dropping to eventually hit -40C that night. We had yet to get down and had no clue exactly how we were to accomplish that. Thankfully it turned out easier/shorter than expected.

Credit: RDB
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 14, 2019 - 11:32am PT


Just looked at Jay's axe again a few posts back. Have to wonder just how old it is as far as Chouinard production goes. Is Doug Robinson around to look at it?

I am thinking one of the very first production piolets.
pacyew

Social climber
Fall City WA
Apr 14, 2019 - 03:19pm PT
I’m curious as well regarding that question. Fritz has posted images of a beautiful ash shafted 55 which shows the same smaller diameter ferrule with tapered wood above. Also the original ‘70 Flyer depicts what appears to be an ash 55 with the same.
pacyew

Social climber
Fall City WA
Apr 14, 2019 - 03:20pm PT
Credit: pacyew
Credit: pacyew
photo not found
Missing photo ID#557694
pacyew

Social climber
Fall City WA
Apr 14, 2019 - 03:32pm PT
Credit: pacyew
Credit: pacyew
Shallower pick width, 1” compared to 1” 5/32” on the ‘73 &#40;right&#4...
Shallower pick width, 1” compared to 1” 5/32” on the ‘73 (right). Also mostly sharp bottomed teeth compared to round bottomed on the ‘73.
Round bottom provides generally better metal fracture protection.
Credit: pacyew
photo not found
Missing photo ID#557697
pacyew

Social climber
Fall City WA
Apr 15, 2019 - 01:49pm PT
Just wanted to add, this ash 55cm came to me from SoCal in pretty much “fresh from the tool shed” condition, with no attempt to clean it up. Rust and dirt had been there awhile. I finally decided to see what it actually might look like under the crud.
Credit: pacyew
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 15, 2019 - 02:08pm PT
Neat axe Jay. The rounded bottom on the teeth is a big deal for durability. Even more so if you get the pick hot cutting in the teeth.
pacyew

Social climber
Fall City WA
Apr 15, 2019 - 02:59pm PT
Yes, a rounded structure is key wherever stress could cause a fracture. What I’m usually doing for a living when not distracted by aging piolets.
[photo
Credit: pacyew
id=557776]
pacyew

Social climber
Fall City WA
Apr 15, 2019 - 03:01pm PT
Credit: pacyew
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 16, 2019 - 12:15am PT

;-)

Credit: RDB
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 20, 2019 - 11:28am PT
I saw the thread mentioning Twight's interview via pod cast. Knowing Mark some I found it entertaining.

Also reminded me of a conversation ha and I had prior to his last Denali climb (CZD) and him retiring. Tool trivia to follow.

At the time bent shafted tools were not all that common. They had easy access to BD tools at the time and I wondered/asked what Mark was taking for tools. At the time I really didn't think a bent shaft tool was gonna be all that great on the upper plod of the Cassin and much of the snow climbing. Mark seemingly agreed and took one of each a straight and a bent shaft. House took a pair of the then "new" bent shafted Cobras.

These were the tools Mark used on the CZD. Funny now when guys use Nomics to get up the Cassin which has a lot less technical climbing than the CZD. And ski poles are now a common bit of added kit for the upper Cassin.

The older Cobra and straight shaft tools are now obsolete for the most part. As are wrist slings. And the new Cobra or Petzl Quark not all that "radical" these days but common tools seen on any technical mtn route.

Credit: RDB

Credit: RDB

Credit: RDB
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Apr 20, 2019 - 11:38am PT
Bob Carmichael, back in the early 90s, made a pretty cool film about Duncan Ferguson climbing Bridalveil in Telluride.
He was using Black Prophets and Mono points. Damn did he ever look smooth!

It's the first time I saw an ice climber just placing their feet, rather than kicking.
Sadly, it's not available on YouTube or anywhere else. At some point I'm going to get a hold of Bob and see if he can come up with it.
RDB

Social climber
Great Basin
Apr 21, 2019 - 01:37pm PT
Neat stuff Tar. Some guys were just ahead of the curve. Took me a long time to get on fragile ice. Ice that in turn required delicate foot and tool placements or you'd simply knock every thing down.

A technique, once learned for both hands and feet (easier yet with modern gear) allows one to climb ice a lot more like you climb rock. I'd sure like to see that film and some of Jello's old stuff again too.


Credit: RDB
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