Classic Ice Primer- Chouinard Catalog 1968

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 481 - 500 of total 568 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
skinner_ab

Big Wall climber
Calgary, Alberta
May 19, 2010 - 09:16am PT
I'm glad someone found this thread and resurrected it for me to stumble upon. It's really got me wondering who RDB is as I look through all the photos of climbs.. many of which are now considered Canadian Classics. The names, Tobin Tobin Sorenson, Bugs McKeith, etc., etc. all of my hero's at the time.

I *thought* it was Bugs who brought the first set of Terrors to Calgary? and soon after all the Big - Steep ice began to be climbed via aiders directly attached to their tools. I remember going to a slide show shortly after the first ascent on Takakkaw Falls. A huge feat at the time, and a moderate WI 4 climb today (except for the 14km ski approach). I'd love to see some more photos of these climbs from the 70's, finding them seems to be getting harder and harder as everyone here seems to ice climb these days and searching the web for anything with the words "ice climbing" in it, returns a couple million photos of classic ass-shots from last season

PS: what you referred to as "snarks",.. weren't they called "snargs"? either way, I never did trust them, it was that long slot that they began cutting into them to allow you to clean the ice out that I thought really compromised their integrity.
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
May 19, 2010 - 02:38pm PT

I want to thank Woz:

For the link to his site.
Great site, keep it up.

It does not look like a commercial site at all.
So it must be a labor of love.

Thankz again.

http://homepage.mac.com/inov8/Compass/compass.html
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
May 20, 2010 - 01:19am PT
Skinner-AB: Re your question?

got me wondering who RDB is as I look through all the photos of climbs

Spokane WA/CDA ID boy: Dane Burns lurks and posts on ST from time to time. I climbed with him some BITD. He is still climbing, and was/is very much the "real deal."

You can contact him thru his Super-Topo link.

skinner_ab

Big Wall climber
Calgary, Alberta
May 20, 2010 - 03:13pm PT
Thanks Fritz, greatly appreciated! I'm surprised I didn't run into him with all the climbing he did in Canada. In the early-mid 70's climbers were a sparse commodity here. In fact we tried counting all the climbers in Calgary once, and at the time and came up with "20". Needless to say, if you ran into another climber, chances were very good that you knew them.

Did you do any climbing in Alberta Fritz?
Bschmitz

Ice climber
mountain view
May 20, 2010 - 03:21pm PT
Dane Burns is still climbing well: Spent a couple days with him up in Canada last season. CLimbed the weeping wall and polar circus with him. Amazing that the guy who did the 2nd ascent of slipstream is still getting after it!!!!! Plus he makes some awsome mods!
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
May 21, 2010 - 12:35am PT
Skinner-AB: I did make trips to Alberta and the Bugs for climbing, twice a year from Moscow Idaho: 1974-1980. However we were just part of the crowd. I had good times, interesting climbing, skiing, and drinking.

Unfortunately, some of my early photos have vanished from this thread, due to re-organizing my Photobucket photos.

I first hit Banff for waterfall climbing in early 1974.

We had never climbed frozen waterfalls, but knew Banff area had a concentration of waterfall climbing.

Chris & I checked into the Mount Royal?? and next morning drove around looking for the rumored frozen waterfalls. We soon spied Cascade Couloir and Rogan’s Gulley. The decision was, try Rogan’s immediately and save the impressive Cascade, until the end of the trip.

Credit: Fritz
I974 Fritz on Cascade Couilor. Note: Jensen pack, Chouinard bamboo axe and wood alpine hammer, Dachstein mitts, Ultimate helmet, Chouinard crampons, and Galibier leather double-boots.


That afternoon, we climbed Cascade, and also met Dane Burns and his climbing buddy Gwain Oka. Later on, my most severe waterfall was Louise Falls, which was a three-winter project, before I finally got up the icicle pitch.

Other than that: the Alberta climbing was doing "trade routes."

I reported the most interesting, and the most nearly fatal in this thread.

Climbing the Chouinard route on Mt. Fay in 1978.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=977914&msg=1101473#msg1101473

Fritz: thinking about the cornice that is about to collapse on him.  C...
Fritz: thinking about the cornice that is about to collapse on him. Chouinard route, Mt. Fay 1978
Credit: Fritz
RDB

Social climber
way out there
May 21, 2010 - 04:43pm PT
I wish more of the guys were still alive to tell their own stories as my perspective is pretty narrow and limited.

But a couple of comments. If you think Snargs were bad try steel conduit!
Not for pro mind you but for rapping.

We climbed all sorts of stuff, Carlsberg, Borgeau and Pilsner with Snargs. They allowed me to make a big jump in my climbing at the time. They were actual pro (not that anyone ever dared fall) and "easy" to place. Real bitch for the 2nd to chop out though.

I never did buy into the conduit. Now we do more with less, using v threads, super fast screws and radical curved tools. No way to really appreciate the ease of and added safety we enjoy now on ice unless you were there in the beginning.

In '73 Cascade was still a difficult climb for us with a alpine hammer, a short piolet and Salewa screws or the odd wart hog if the ice was warm enough to take one.

Things changed very quickly every season after that. The first Terro's I saw were the Burgess Twin's. From Porter, Bugs and the Burgess Twins on Polar Circus. Gotta remember that the 2nd ascent by Laurie Skreslet and his gang that same week iirc was a "free ascent". No aid required and everyone using pretty much the same gear.

No question Bugs was pushing everyone mentally and physically though locally and in his writings.

So the terro aid techniques that Bugs wrote about really were dead by the time the article saw print.

Can you imagine such a small community and just how bad the communication really was back then?

Pays to remember that it could be years and generally no less than a full season (6 months) before any North American climbing news hit a publication. Mountain Magazine was really the only international publication then.

I know I was quite surprised to have found the picture of Jeff and George Lowe aiding the ice cliff on Temple was several years old before it made the cover of Mtn Magazine. State of the art was well ahead of what you see in the climbing magazines back then. That same season (when the pic was published) Temple got two or three new routes all free through the ice cliff.

There were some really good alpine climbers in Canada at the time..late '70s and early '80s. John Lauchlan, Jim Elzinga, Kevin Doyle, Barry Blanchard, James Blench, Albi Sole, Dwayne Congdon come to mind off hand as well as the token American's, Carlos Buhler, Gregg Cronn and Gary Silver a few among many climbing from Spokane or farther south of the border in Colorado, California or Montana and making weekend trips north or just living in Canada at the time.

Some of the names you'll recognize others you won't I suspect. But one of the seasons and teams that still inspires me is Lauchlan's and Congdon's Chamonix season in '79 iirc. Early and very fast ascents of the MacIntyre/Colton, the Ginat and a hand full of others. Same climbs Ueli Steck got so much milage out of by soloing this year (Ginat) and last (M-C). Obviously hard* climbs with heady reputations even today. Handful of American's in Chamonix in those years doing similar stuff but not many and most still around post here at ST today.

They had their own amazing season in '77 iirc? Dru Coulior, le Droites, Pilar de Angle, Eiger Direct among others.

Freeing Nemesis, Weeping Pillar and other plums fell to those same Canadians. It wasn't long before the technical end of simple vertical ice would be met and M-climbing was about to take off in a big way.

Climbs in Chamonix that any of the Canadians listed could have just as easily as John and Duane did, was my take on it having been around many of them. In the climbing magazines at the time any number of outsiders were the first to take credit in the publications for freeing some of the early water fall test pieces. And now the history is so blurred and many of the original players dead so we'll never know what really did happen and when.

But I have no doubt many of the early ice climbs were first freed by the Canadians, no matter who was given the guide book credit.

An after thought, since Brian mentioned it. My first recollections of doing Polar Circus was argueing about how much gear we should take. Some very good and very experienced climbers wanted to take haul bags in '79.

I didn't think so and to get more beta soloed to the upper pillars one after noon in late Nov. and decided a two day trip was in order. When we again hit the bivy cave by mid day in Jan with over night gear I knew then I had blown i that estimation.

I came back again a month or so later and did an early one day ascent. A lot changed in just a couple of seasons '79/'81.

Now most spend a 1/2 day on the climb. I climbed it this winter as a rope team faster than I have soloed it just a few years ago. Things really have changed.

Gear and clothing for a 1.5 day, almost zero beta, ascent 1980


Gear and clothing for a 5.5 hr, 30 years of beta, ascent in 2010
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
May 21, 2010 - 05:09pm PT
Fritz, I love that photo! That was the exact setup I had, same boots, same crampons, even the same hammer (that I used to use for extracting nuts), same Dachstein mitts. The only difference was I had the fiberglass axe and an orange Joe Brown helmet.
skinner_ab

Big Wall climber
Calgary, Alberta
May 22, 2010 - 04:48am PT
Wow.. I never imagined I'd see photo's, stories, and names from my era and connected with routes in my own backyard here on ST.

I have lots of comments on the last posts by Fritz and RDB, but they'll have to wait until tomorrow evening as it's 2:30 AM here and I am going climbing in 3 hours. Great stuff guys!
RDB

Social climber
way out there
May 27, 2010 - 02:29pm PT
A picture of Fred at 86 years old (last year) and a piolet in the back round seem appropriate.



And interesting the tool he chooses from the wall for a tight shot.



more here:
http://www.rodmarphoto.com/category/portraits/

Yvon Chouinard 2 years ago at 70.

marty(r)

climber
beneath the valley of ultravegans
May 27, 2010 - 03:02pm PT
Check out Fred´s 2¨ x 4¨ on a sling! You don´t see that on the rack very often!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - May 28, 2010 - 11:39am PT
Reached straight for the Mountain Technology axe, if I am not mistaken!?!
RDB

Social climber
way out there
May 28, 2010 - 01:15pm PT
Hey thought this should go here as well. An email answer I got this morning from a querry I sent months ago about new Galiber Super Guides..35 to 50 in half sizes as well :) If I only knew my metric size for sure...next time I am in France!

Contact Chaussure Paraboot [mailto:contact@chaussure-paraboot.com]
Envoyé : vendredi 16 avril 2010 15:57
À : s.noussan@paraboot.com
Objet : TR: Message du site Internet Richard-Pontvert Paraboot

Dear Sir,

It is possible to order directly from us against payment in advance by bank transfer.

The amount is 263.38 € + 37.10 € air parcel post shipping charges = 300.48 €



Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - May 28, 2010 - 02:27pm PT
Thanks for the Galibier update, Dane! Refurbishing my old pair has just never been worth it once the interior leather gave out. Plastic boots are simply not as good on rock despite the weight savings, IMO.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 27, 2010 - 12:06pm PT
Ice bump!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 10, 2010 - 11:36am PT
Spring gully ice Bump!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 20, 2010 - 10:28am PT
Bump for Gordon!
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Aug 20, 2010 - 12:12pm PT
Looking way back at the beginning of this and the catalog with the Annapurna Glasses I think that is BJ or Bill Johnson wearing them. BJ and Tony Jessen were early surfing buddies of Yvon and worked at the Skunk Works in Ventura for many years.
Tony Bird

climber
Northridge, CA
Aug 20, 2010 - 12:27pm PT
chouinard tried to invent and market his own science of mountaineering. he's a clothes shark at heart and his surf side is much heavier.

piolet gourmet s'il vous plaît? just jab the friggin' ice with the point.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 3, 2010 - 11:28am PT
Tis' the season for jolly tinkering!
Messages 481 - 500 of total 568 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Trip Report and Articles
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews