Blown Out Climber Series: Routine Sunday Ski & Rubble Ogle

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
This thread has been locked
Messages 1 - 126 of total 126 in this topic
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 18, 2007 - 09:58pm PT
Ogle:
To glance with amorous invitation or challenge.
To eye amorously or provocatively.
To look at especially with greedy or interested attention.


Sweet!
Just me 'n that spot on my lens went fer the usual romp.
'Mostly I do this cuz, um, shoot, not sure really.


Here's an overview of the gen'ral area:


And a tighter shot of my objective,
To eyeball the 3 prominent peaks of the Blue Lake Cirque,
Pawnee Peak, Mt Toll, & Paiute Peak:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 18, 2007 - 09:59pm PT
So I skied up the 5 miles into Blue Lake Cirque.
That's Mt Pawnee on the left, and Mt Toll on the right:


And Toll to the left with Paiute on the right:


Up Closer,

Pawnee Peak:



Mt Toll,
With a snow covered & frozen Blue Lake beneath,
The right skyline is a 3-5 pitch rock buttress, which goes at 5.6:



Paiute Peak:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 18, 2007 - 10:00pm PT
On Pawnee Peak,
The prominent line on the buttress,
Well, sort of prominent, will likely be easy/moderate 5th class, 4-6 pitches:


And then I skied back out on my tracks,
Steering left of that lens blem,
'Cuz if I'd hit that I might have face planted:

paganmonkeyboy

Trad climber
the blighted lands of hatu
Feb 18, 2007 - 10:24pm PT
sweet, tarbuster - thanks for the pics and bringing back memories of my old stomping grounds...that whole area is a wonderful place to play...
hossjulia

Trad climber
Eastside
Feb 18, 2007 - 10:34pm PT
PMB, same here!

Thanks tarbuster, used to ski in there alot. But no complaints, today I skied 6" fresh on Tioga Pass, and tomorrow, Dawn Patrol!
Looking forward to the first powder turns of the season.

Gotta get first tracks before our guests track it up!

Ogle, oh yeah baby, ole hoss here has been ogle'n an old friend of yours...............man can he float up the 'milks!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 18, 2007 - 10:43pm PT
My pleasure gents.
Who dat be doin' the floatin' Hoss?
Man I love dem Milks!
426

Sport climber
Buzzard Point, TN
Feb 19, 2007 - 09:34am PT
cool stuff (literally), Tar. Rubble Ogle Appreciation.
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 19, 2007 - 02:04pm PT
You're a man after my own heart, Roy. I used to cruise those Indian Peaks summer and winter, lookin' for gems and just enjoynig that Colorado high terrain ambience.

I've hijacked your photo and drawn in a few routes I did on the north side of Pawnee. The orange and yellow line were alpine solo cruises. The red line is a two-pitch route up into a big, leaning corner with an offwidth cux (funny, the amount of offwidth talk on this forum, recently). One of my claims to fame is that my partner, Mark Wilford, backed off the crux, then I went up and lead it. Anyone who knows Wilford knows he doesn't back off of very much. Truth is, though, I found a little crack deep inside the offwidth portion to use, that Mark hadn't discovered, that made the climbing somewhat reasonable.

Also, there are occasional good mixed lines on that hill.



goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Feb 19, 2007 - 05:57pm PT
Pawnee seems a bit of a choss pile on it's lower sections, guess I need to sack up and take a second look at it this summer. Gulp!
hossjulia

Trad climber
Eastside
Feb 19, 2007 - 05:59pm PT
hey tar, your ole buddy Finn, that's who!
Mike.

climber
Feb 19, 2007 - 07:25pm PT
bumpalicious
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Feb 19, 2007 - 07:55pm PT
Roy,
Nice pictures of a beautiful day in the hills. I was going to ask if it was windy, then I saw that your tracks up had already almost filled in by the time you went down. Never mind.

Here’s some more high country ambiance: a few shots of the same area from a different perspective. These are from an outing to Mt. Audobon, last spring.



Jello, any crags around here that you haven't explored?

Rick
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 19, 2007 - 09:58pm PT
Don't know, Rick, there's lots of nooks and crannies out there! The west side of Indian Peaks is even better, with a lot of good multi-pitch (up to six or eight-pitches) routes to do, but you have to walk for them. That stuff on Pawnee is just 4th and 5th-class scrambling with the exception of the route Wilford and I did, which is 5.10 or so. Fun romping in the mountains, though.

There are also good new routes to be had on the south-facing wall over by Devil's Thumb. Some features look like challenging free climbs up to about 1,000'. I went part-way up one of them years ago, encountering good rock up to 5.11, but it got late, so we rapped. We had eaten up too much time on the long approach from the east. Drive the road from the west up to Rollins Pass and walk the Divide for a few miles north to the area. Cuts the approach (walking part) in half.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2007 - 11:36pm PT
Well allrighty then!
Thanks fer drawin’ in them snappy route lines Jeff.
Here, maybe you cud try some more?


There’s quite a lot of rocky-rubble along the deep cleft of the Middle Saint Vrain Creek drainage; most of it is South facin’ stuff forming a long escarpment along the north side, on the right as you ski in.



I also spotted some systems of fairly thick, but shortish & discontinuous ice pillars ‘n whatnot, that go up gulleys maybe a 1000’. Prolly more truble than they’re worth.
All tucked into this morass of chutes and benches:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2007 - 11:36pm PT
The Elk’s Tooth commands the cirque at the end of the tour, above St Vrain Glacier:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2007 - 11:37pm PT
Most of this stuff is dis-continuous, anywhere between 400’-1000’ in height:

This is the first biggish (for the area) thing you come to, sort of non-descript and brooding:


This pillar contains what, shoot, might be the Astroman of the St Vrain!
Haa-Haa; the line on the left, a big cleft, looks to be 2 long pithes; up the middle is a thing which looks like The Narrows, plucked from a chunk of the Steck Salathe,
While the broad buttress on the right would look to be 4th class:




And then there's this thingamajobber:


And before you come to the Elk’s tooth, is this broad 400’ cliff band with obvious craggin’ potential:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2007 - 11:38pm PT
Thanks fer joinin' in fellas; Ricky I like your pictures!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2007 - 11:47pm PT
And before I sign off,
Here's a pic fer Hoss 'n me,
Of one of my fave buddies, Bob Finn:


(name that route; this is an upper pitch; if I post the first pitch it's a slam dunk)
taco bill

Trad climber
boulder, co
Feb 20, 2007 - 12:36am PT
Green spur/slab? That neck of the woods or am I totally off?

Climbed in eldo yesterday for the first time in months. I think this is the latest in the year I've ever gotten my pass.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 20, 2007 - 12:46am PT
Well Done Taco B!
Here's the first pitch of Green Spur:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 20, 2007 - 01:08am PT
...But I digress.
Here's a couple sweet summer's pic of the Devil's Thumb,
And the wall to its right, of which Jello spoke upthread.

This first shot shows the Thumb as it stounds out sharply,
Plus, yup, that's the USATF '05 & '06 Womens Masters Mountain Runner of the Year, my wife, Lisa G!
Note the critical foot stance required to win such an honor:


The second photo depicts the Jello Wall a bit better,
(or is it the Jello Mold?...naw, that must be sumwhere in the greater ranges)
As well we see here some dope-adled internet surfer:

paganmonkeyboy

Trad climber
the blighted lands of hatu
Feb 20, 2007 - 09:46am PT
mmmm....dope-adled surfing....

ever try swimming to the island in island lake ? we tried *once* - wouldn't recommend it...
taco bill

Trad climber
boulder, co
Feb 20, 2007 - 10:17am PT
My friend says of that first pitch of Green Spur, "Dude, it's so typical Eldo. It looks like 5.11, it feels like 5.10, and it's rated 5.9."

One of my favorites though. Better of the 2 spurs in my opinion.

adam
Inner City

Trad climber
East Bay
Feb 20, 2007 - 02:41pm PT
BUMP for Tarbuster, thread creator extraordinaire! What a life!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 20, 2007 - 05:37pm PT
Thanks Inner City!

Now Jello, I'm still hopin' you'll break out yer 'lectric pen and mark up those St Vrain pictures...
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 20, 2007 - 05:47pm PT
Sorry to dissappoint, Tarbooter, but I did like you. Skied and slogged up that long valley several times, winter and summer, and just never quite got motivated to climb. Not to say you couldn't find something...

That pic of the Devil's Thumb wall, however, shows the potential, there. A dozen obvious lines on that thing in summer, and several good ice and mixed lines in winter. Never heard of anything being done on it, but somebody must have done something? The best lines would have climbing equivalent to the best routes in RMNP. Reachable in about two hours from Rollins pass, unless you happen to be your wife, Lisa. Then it's probably about 30 minutes!
blackbird

Trad climber
over yonder en th' holler
Feb 20, 2007 - 09:26pm PT
gorgeous pics, tarhoney! thanx for sharin' (and sorry for the late kudos...!!)

BB
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 20, 2007 - 11:15pm PT
Right then, I guess I'll have to go the distance, romp soma that rubble and wield my own electric marker after the fact!

I agree about that wall next to the Devil's Thumb Jeff; nice grey granite.

It is hit and miss to tag a clear view when out on skis in these parts so close to the divide, but this weekend I'm going to try to snap a portrait of Shoshoni's south facin' towers, as I know they've been climbed...

And if you find anything like this hidin' out down your way Samantha, you'll be sure to share the secrit right?
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 21, 2007 - 12:21pm PT
OK Tar, you bring home the bacon (pics of the south and west sides of Shoshoni, and maybe some of the broad south-facing cliffs of Apache, west of Shoshoni), and I'll be able to paint up some decent, fun lines for you there, from 5.8 to 5.10, from 5 to 8 pitches.

The most impressive wall in that area faces west off the Divide, a little north of Apache Peak. Looks a bit like a larger version of the Black Wall on Mt Evans. My cousin, George and I did an 800' 5.10 face and crack line on the right side, but to the left the wall overhangs from top to bottom. It's often dripping wet, though.

EDIT: That wet wall might provide an incredible mixed ice line in fall or spring.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2007 - 02:20pm PT
Jello,
So this last item you referenced must be visible from the drainage just east of Crater Lake Cirque, where Lone Eagle Peak sits; more or less directly between the divide and Lone Eagle.

I wanna do the long trudge up into that area to romp the remote Apache Glacier, so I should be in good position to see the wall which you and George climbed eh?.

We'll see how it goes visibility wise this Sunday when I get up towards Isabelle Glacier to take a real good look at Shoshoni & Apache.
goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Feb 21, 2007 - 02:32pm PT
This where yah talking about, right above Triangle Lake?

Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 21, 2007 - 04:01pm PT
Goat, the wall I'm talking about is just over the ridge in the far left foreground of your pic. I snagged some shots off the net to illustrate. (is this legal to do?? or ethical for personal use? to re-post a shot like this?)

Arrows on topo map idicate climbs on Shoshoni/Apache. Top circle indicates a nice west-facing buttress on Mt Toll, tha Mason Frischette and I climbed most of before traversing off below a problematical final pitch. The lower circle is the wall on the west flank of Shoshoni that I'm talking about.

George's and my route on the Shoshoni Wall.


The Shoshoni Wall is the saddle-back formation in the upper center right.
goatboy smellz

climber
colorado
Feb 21, 2007 - 04:22pm PT
Oooo! That looks pretty clean!

edit: Got it, due east from Lone Eagle Peak, looks fun.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2007 - 05:33pm PT
Nice Jeff, Thanks.

That's clearly one of the better things around here and I've not yet been in position to see it so well as it is presented in those photos.
L

climber
The City of Lost Angels
Feb 21, 2007 - 05:44pm PT
Nice thread Tar--you guys have some awesome photos here. Keep up the good work!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 09:54pm PT
Thanks L!

OK Jello,
No go on visibility this weekend in the Indian Peaks, so no clear shots of the buttress on Shoshoni or the East Facing Wall of Apache; I did manage the “Commando Run” (Vail Pass to Vail) on Friday & skied up into Coney Lake today, which sits below the N flank of Audubon.

So on to a scramble tour of the Continental Divide from Wild Basin to Isabelle Glacier.

I did this over 2 days in July of ’97 to get a good look at what the Indian Peaks has to offer.

I had only an approximate idea on my estimated time, very little info on the technical nature of the terrain, other than the 5.6 ridge of Mt Toll and it was suggested I do it N to S, so as to get the good “up” climbs along the ridge. My plan was to carry on over N & S Arapahoe Peaks as well.

I brought a bag & bivi sack, 3 days food, 2 quarts water, no stove. Steve Pomerance suggested July was good because I could use iodine and collect melt water. I wore Robbins boots & carried a 65cm aluminum ax and expected primarily 4th class terrain if I stuck strictly to the ridge. In lieu of a short length of rope, a few pieces, or a helmet, I of course wore my cowboy hat.

Here’s the start & part of the first day:


Here’s the second day, with bivi at the break mark:



And here’s what Kevin Cooney told me he did, on a long fall day:


Buz Burrel recently told me he did all of both projects in a day and dubbed it “The LA Freeway”

I think the original Pfiffner Traverse includes all of this as well.

That nice red headed alpinist guy from Boulder, Bruce Miller, loaned me his bivi sack for my trip and said he wanted to do it in reverse, ie, S to N, from Arapahoe Peaks to Longs in a day.

Awesome Trail Tracks Panoramic Hiking Maps by James Niehues & Fern Horn Endeavors.

Pictures to follow…
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 10:16pm PT
I started at 7am, reaching the Continental divide at 11am:


The drainage leading past Pipit Lake & up to the divide:


The Continental Divide, right where I gained it, at roughly 11+ or 12,000’:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 10:32pm PT
I was pleased to find it very grassy & easy going during the initial few miles encountered along the ridge:


But clouds were gathering and lightning struck to the north, so I felt OK as my heading was south, away from the concentration of weather cells. This was my view to the south, heading over some easy summits above the St Vrain Glacier:


The Peaks in the background are L to R, Audubon, Paiute, & Toll; as it turned out, I bivied just before a long technical ridge leading to Paiute:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 10:43pm PT
Hi Tim!
Yah, I went up into the clouds today, to Coney Lakes, which is a drainage off the St Vrain to the south. Pretty snowy. My partner was an ex US ski team GS champion, so I got quite a workout.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 10:56pm PT
This section of the ridge goes pretty quickly, only a touch of 3rd class scrambling:


Looking back towards Meeker & Longs, things were getting gnarlier:


So I kept up my pace, feeling somewhat chased.
Later, another view to the north,
I think that's Elk Tooth in clouds:


Then I got into these cool roller coaster sections.
And the clouds hung low, but were tame:

paganmonkeyboy

Trad climber
the blighted lands of hatu
Feb 25, 2007 - 11:06pm PT
tarbuster - you keep this up and i'm gonna have to move back there ;-)
sweet pics, sweet thread. you ever do anything in the rawahs ? nokhu crags, numbered lakes, etc ?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 11:25pm PT
Things were starting to feel kind of big: big sky, big space.

At one point, the ridge drops through Buchanan pass and a trail is crossed, It felt still pretty darned remote though.


This is what this section looks like at sunrise, early springtime, from a road on the east side, with Sawtooth in the center and my bivi on Algonquin Peak, along the ridge to the left:


Looking back north on the rolleys:


Looking west in the vicinity of Buchanan Pass:


Sawtooth:


All the photos are pretty bleached and rough; they were sort of dark and I had to extract what I could.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 11:29pm PT
Paganmonkey:
Nope.
Clue me in Bro!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 11:45pm PT
OK, so the weather was clearing.
I started to view some more challenging terrain ahead, maybe for the next day.
It was like a gift; after all, the fell walking was cool, but I wanted some rock.
It also looked and felt like the perfect trap, kind of like a spider's web.

So this is Paiute's seldom viewed NW face coming into my sight,
Also, in the far right corner, that little blob of snow, is Algonquin:
(This's where Lisa & I were married 3 years later, but that's another story):


Then, 12 hours into it, I summited Algonquin; 12 sumthin' feeties.
I was at the end of the easy stuff.
I snapped this pic looking toward Audubon, layed out a black trash bag to melt water in the snow and went to sleep.

WBraun

climber
Feb 25, 2007 - 11:51pm PT
"....layed out a black trash bag to melt water in the snow and went to sleep."

While the gardener worked effortlessly in the background.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2007 - 11:53pm PT
Hahaahhaha!
Most excellent point my friend.
paganmonkeyboy

Trad climber
the blighted lands of hatu
Feb 25, 2007 - 11:57pm PT
oh its just more of the same - grandeur and majesty everywhere you look ;-)
you can take 14 to cameron, hang a right on laramie river road before chambers lake - then take the west branch/rawah trail up to grassy pass from the south and come down on the numbered lakes and there's a sick ridge between south and north rawah. i'd been meaning to take a couple llamas in there from that ranch near ft fun for a decade now, ever since running into a SAR guy with pack goats on the way to greyrock (excellent climbing on and east of greyrock i'm told...) if you fish, the lakes used to be full, but i'm not sure the whirling epidemic didn't take the population down a bit.
camp lake is crowded - #s 2, 3, 4 and the twin crater lakes were mucho better imho...and the wall in front of lake 4 - not sure if there's anything that would go on it, but it's pretty shear.
i think the nokhu crags are a little too broken to have anything on them as a route, but still a formidable hike up and on from 14 - used to ski there from time to time too...

thanks tarbuster - way sweet memories this brings ;-)
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Feb 26, 2007 - 12:11am PT
Tar- you nail the heart of the matter, every time.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 26, 2007 - 12:15am PT
Yah Pagan,
Cameron Pass is sweet viewin' fer sure: it's good to know there's more stuff adjacent to it to git' all rolled up in.

So are the memories sweet, eh?
The present, which contains our recollection of the past as well as our anticipation of the future -it's all we got.

...and then there's that gardener dude.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 26, 2007 - 12:17am PT
Thanks Jeff.
'Nice to have you aboard.

I like ridin' your sloop too.
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Feb 26, 2007 - 12:52am PT
Nice stuff Tar...now go buy my guide to the area.
Prod

Social climber
Charlevoix, MI
Feb 26, 2007 - 08:56am PT
The "Roy" I used to know hated hiking, no, he f*#king hated hiking. It was just an ends to the means of a great piece of rock. Or in some cases the end of the con of me, to get me to follow him up some chossy obscure route that no one else would do with him.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 26, 2007 - 10:03am PT
I know Prod (Guy), all troo.
And we did git' up some obscure stuff.
But this wasn't hiking; even though I was on my feet, putting one in front of the other,
It was like some bizarre fight or flight skyline steeplechase.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2007 - 10:50am PT
...Back to the Colorado Indian Peaks Continental Divide ridge traverse from Wild Basin south to Isabelle Glacier.

The prior day was a good one.
I'd left the car at 7am and hoofed it pretty good to get a lot of beautiful, grassy, cross country ridge top scenery underfoot, arriving on top of Algonquin Peak at 7pm, right at the crown of the easy terrain.

The sky dawned clear, with a good view to the west:


And to the southeast my morning’s work in plain view;
A couple hours worth of 4th class ridge work leading up into Paiute Peak’s NW face:


In the far background are, left to right, Navajo & Apache, with the prominent sunny snow saddle between (actually Navajo Glacier's upper lip); they are connected to the ridge in the foreground by the continuous and well defined crest of the Continental Divide.


Panning south I could see Cascade Creek drainage, where the Crater Lake Cirque, home to the popular Stettner Route on Lone Eagle Peak is bounded by a rocky and glaciated east west ridge now in plain view.
From left to right are Navajo Peak, Navajo Glacier, Apache Peak, Apache Glacier, Peck Glacier, & Hopi Glacier (Hopi in full sun). The prominent sunlit tower dead center is either Limbo or Iroquois, with Lone Eagle's sun-scraped summit straight below:


I really had just a rough idea how far I could make it this day, but I really wanted to get up on that cool snow saddle between Apache & Navajo. First I had to navigate the ridge to Paiute, get up a reasonable break in Paiute’s NW Face, then discover Mt Toll’s North Ridge.


As you can see by the red line, er, I didn’t quite get to continue on to Apache & Navajo; more about that in a bit…
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2007 - 01:49pm PT
From mid way along the dragon's back ridge leading up to Paiute,
Looking back along my path past the bivi on Algonquin, towards Wild Basin, Meeker & Longs in the far background:


The rock ridge was varied; mostly 4th class. I jammed a 70' 5.7 crack to regain the ridge when I mistakenly followed a grassy ramp too far around a corner. At one point I down climbed a short overhang and then hanging from jams, let go to free drop down onto the path below. Just past that, getting around a tower, I needed to downclimb a 5.6 OW.

One of the towers along the way:


Paiute's lower NW face was split by a nice 3rd class cleft which went very straight forward; then to top out I opted for an icy chimney, which required a section of fingerlocks mixed with a spicy mantel right at the extraction point. When I topped out, I sucked in some sharp air, looked over the edge back down toward the ridge and viewed a perfect 3rd class v-slot which I would rather have used...

The top of Paiute offered an excellent view of my next challenge, which would be the N Ridge of Mt Toll. The question was, which of 3 prominent lines?

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2007 - 10:26pm PT
Given that I was shod in comfy "Blue Meany" Robbins boots and burdened with a 30 lb pack, I needed to savor the cruise factor, going wherever possible up the most direct and easiest path.

So I chose the middle of the 3 lines on Mt Toll, between the 2 sunlit buttresses, just right of the continuous snow gulley, where I could tip toe up the perfectly flat 5th class granite.


I now know the standard 5.6 N Ridge route to be the Buttress on the right, but at the time I figured it was the choppier looking buttress on the left.

Once over the 5th class on Mt. Toll, I hit my stride back on the routine 4th class terrain and stopped to take a shot down my path:

Mimi

climber
Mar 1, 2007 - 10:35pm PT
Soothing to the soul Roy. Glad to see you're in your element big time right now.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2007 - 11:34pm PT
Yah, that sums it up nicely Mimi.

This 2 day section on the divide was lush, lonesome, and compelling; I never saw any tracks or traces. When I was forced to leave by the weather, I felt torn away from my place and I just wanted to stay up there on that fertile edge: moving quickly, making choices, being careful…




This last shot shows what is perhaps the top of Shoshoni’s West Face, climbed by Jello & referenced by him upthread. I had scant opportunity to know what lurked beneath; after summiting Mt Toll, then romping over Pawnee Peak, the weather was gathering again and my swiftness was urged, but at times, when I passed above features like this, I would peer around the edges and sense the uplift of air speeding up the vertical rise from way below.
Zander

Trad climber
Berkeley
Mar 1, 2007 - 11:45pm PT
Tar my friend,
You have made my day! Thank You.
Zander
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Mar 2, 2007 - 12:15am PT
You have completely nailed the goodness and adventure, Tar. You brought me along on the whole traverse.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 2, 2007 - 12:17am PT
Hey Zander & Jeff what nice things to say.
Cheers,
Roy
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 2, 2007 - 12:44am PT
Well, it was around 11 am when I speedily roamed up over towards the easy shoulder of Shoshoni to view the prize of Apache & Navajo. From miles away I imagined myself, ax in hand, carefully stemming the spine of snow between these two peaks, sucking in the freedom of the hills:


I stood out along the parapet of Shoshoni and gandered down a dizzying sequence of steps leading down from the summit, out toward Apache via a long connecting ridge graced with towers and sinewy edges, trying to see where I might descend:


I decided this time to scout a few options, because I didn’t favor the crumbled staircase leading straight out and down.

First then, I ventured down a gulley to the east, hoping to find a traversing ledge to skirt the difficulties. I scooted down to the brink of an edge where the gulley spit out into sky & clouds, with the plains roaring away below my feet. My pack was scraping against the wall behind, pushing my torso uneasily outwards above the yawn. I saw my path go ‘round the corner, but the wall above the narrow foot ledge was steep enough to topple me and there was a large coffin lid flake occupying the sweet spot.

Just then I swallowed, decided to turn back. As I turned around my hip brushed an ancient peg with some weathered tat on it. So I went back up to the summit: from there I surveyed the western side and found my way, happily down jamming an easy 5th class crack, stuffing feet, wedging hands, feeling the weight of my pack pulling me into the crack.

Quickly I touched down, stepped into the col and without hesitation set out along an ascending 4th class traverse toward Apache's N Ridge, using wide reaches of the arms, making time underneath darkening skies.
paganmonkeyboy

Trad climber
the blighted lands of hatu
Mar 2, 2007 - 12:50am PT
sweeeeet...mucho sweeeeet...
Prod

Social climber
Charlevoix, MI
Mar 2, 2007 - 09:16am PT
Hey Tar,

Gotta tell you. You're advanced hiking stories are a hoot to read. Sort of Jack London-ish in their hugeness and simple bold description. How about spinning a yarn with a little more free association, ala Melville’s Nostromo. If not bravo for what you have put out there.

Prod.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 2, 2007 - 09:55pm PT
Well gee Prod,
Glad you enjoy the recollections.

Maybe we oughta have ourselves a little reunion and get up on ona' them bigger Teton's, wouldn't that be Grand?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 2, 2007 - 10:00pm PT
Well darnit’
If’n yer readin’ this real time, now Jello is propin’ up the real goods over on that ’78 Sports Illustrated Bridalveil Solo thread, so I better wrap this scramblin’tale up before it gets stale.

So, I was traversing beneath the east side of what is known as the Chessman, a set of pinnacles that proudly separate Shoshoni and Apache over what must be a half mile or so. You can see them quite well from Lake Granby, on the west side of things. I was seeing them pretty well, because I was traversing their mid sections on really fun 4th class rock, grappling upwards via an auspicious set of diagonal feldspar dikes.

Problem was, it was getting very dark overhead and not the kind of darkness brought on by nightfall you know; certainly not the stuff you feel comfortable with when clinging to a high ridge. I blasted back down part of the route to reach a gap in the ridge in order to afford a better look at the weather on the west side. With what I saw I became a little conflicted. So I merrily snatched the holds and went all the way back up and finally saddled onto one of the last of these towers, looking down into a deep set notch that separated me from the good cruising on Apache’s north ridge. When I topped out it became apparent that some down climbing and intricate route finding needed to be entertained.

It was time to go home. I returned once more across the angled terrain, descending towards a place where I could smartly step onto Isabelle glacier without any tricks. So back down I travelled and the holds felt good and the movement exhilarating. Soon, upon reaching the proper transition to snow, I pulled off my pack, put on some gloves, gripped my ax, turned around facing the slope and began kicking deep steps downward into the slope.

Instead of a sense of defeat, I felt just the same sense of meaning as I had at many points during the jolly excursion; it was just another perfunctory task of rhythmic movement which mountaineers perform, because at some point they make good decisions, and begin to do the type of climbing that allows them to get off of things and go home.



Here are some very blackened, foreshortened shots, right to left (north to south), of the path which would have lead me onward towards Arikaree, Deshawa, and finally Arapahoe peaks, where I presumed I would get a second bivi.

The Chessman:


Chessman & Apache’s N Ridge:


Apache’s East Wall:


Navajo , with the little pinnacle of Dicker’s Peck to the right:
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Mar 2, 2007 - 10:12pm PT
Absolutely perfect line to end the ramble with, Roy:

"Instead of a sense of defeat, I felt just the same sense of meaning as I had at many points during the jolly excursion: meaning it was just another perfunctory task of rhythmic movement which mountaineers perform, because at some point they make good decisions, get off of things and go home."

Represents the best of adventurous alpinism.

bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 2, 2007 - 10:22pm PT
tar...let's end it on this!

Mimi

climber
Mar 2, 2007 - 10:25pm PT
Sorry Bob, this is too good to stop just yet.

Great TR Roy. And Mountain Jello's perspective is so nice.

Edit: That is a very nice pic Bob. You always post such nice flora and scenery pics. Must be around that awesome place you live.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 2, 2007 - 10:32pm PT
Nice Bob,

A sweet little flower to punctuate the final sights which I looked upon with glee as I walked out; some towers jutting out from a spur of Shoshoni.

Bob, Jeff,
Have either of you perhaps climbed a splitter crack in one of these?


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 2, 2007 - 10:48pm PT
Kevin Donald once told me he and Duncan used to do a high camp up there on Isabelle Glacier with clients, then, at night, they'd solo up those snow gullies on Shoshoni, when the snow was nice and firm.
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 2, 2007 - 11:54pm PT
Thanks Mimi...here another one on the same trail in IPWA.


great thread Tar.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2007 - 12:26am PT
Yer awesome Bob,

-A nice lil' bouquet of Columbine, the Colorado state flower, laid with gentleman's charm in Mimi's arms, so she can share them with the rest of us.

Berg Heil!
Mighty Hiker

Social climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 3, 2007 - 12:30am PT
Some very fine stories about fjell rangling, or if you like tinde rangling, in Colorado. Thanks!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2007 - 12:36pm PT
Well Anders,
That last little prattle of mine indeed veered awfull close to actual climbing.

But yes, really some sort of Fellfurghnuegen or something eh?

This 'ole guide by Dick Du Mais pretty much sums up the spirit underlying the Sunday Ski & Rubble Ogle:

Prod

Social climber
Charlevoix, MI
Mar 3, 2007 - 04:18pm PT
Yo "Roy",

How about answering my last email... Anyway, you pick the date for Grand Teton. I'm thinking somewhere between Mid-June to Mid-September. I'm pretty open for a surgical attack, if you're thinking longer, we'd have to plan a bit on my part.

G.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2007 - 10:17pm PT
Sorry Prod, yah we can do The Grand,
But I don't answer emails or phone calls.
Cuz I live on Supertopo.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2007 - 10:19pm PT
Nope,
Not done yet.
Never done, there’s work to do.

So back to it.


In our tireless search for rubble to rumble over, we ski, and we ogle:


Sometimes you can’t see much in the way of rock, so you take what you get:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2007 - 10:38pm PT
Ah, now that’s a lil’ bit better.
This is The Gore Range, seen from an 18 mile one way tour, known as the Commando Run:



Top of Siberia Peak, at the end of the ascent portion of the tour:



What goes up get’s to go down, sometimes way, way down:


Not sure what them peaks is called.
But darnit I'm gonnah git in there under 'em,
Take a closer look at their name tags and find out.
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Mar 4, 2007 - 12:00am PT
Nice, Tar, Sorry Bob, but it's not over till the fat lupine sings.

This year's commando, Roy? I've done it three times, three different years, never with orange plastic, though maybe once with green plastic franken-t-2's, though I'm into leather for that sort of thing. Never without drinkies at the dreaded 2 elks, though!!

A very cool tour!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 12:26am PT
A week ago friday Jay.
I prefer touring on 3 pin with leather boots but was advised against it for this one.

Not really a very experienced off piste skier, in fact this was the first time I'd toured with an AT rig and the first time I'd used the stuff for turning outside of lift service.

Glad I did, otherwise my little twig legs would've snapped at the knee, probably no matter what the snow condition, which happened to be oatmeal & breakable crust for the entire descent once we got a bit below Siberia.

The snow was in fact so bad, Pomerance, who has done it every year for 20/30 years, on all kinds of gear, just put us on the road after a while. ...and the views were darling.


Wahoo!
Jaybro

Social climber
The West
Mar 4, 2007 - 12:28am PT
Cool sh#t there whatever the gear eh, tar?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 12:30am PT
Yah no doubt man.
I just love kickin' around in the snow and making skis go!
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Mar 4, 2007 - 12:38am PT
I love that tour. Roy, you were with Steve Pomerance? What's that old Boulder politco up to?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 09:43am PT
Well to spin out some thread drift Jello Bean,

He's still doin' politics and is married to his soul mate Allyn.

A couple months back, Sibley got back with Deborah & got hitched. So Bill Roos, Gino, Karl Arndt, Bob Carmichael, John Ruger, Burt Redmane, shoot a few others whom you know, had a little gathering thanks to Mike Yokel. Man what a re-union; very nice.

So these last weeks Pomerance and I have been playing hooky every Friday on the WI 3/4 circuit. I hadn't done any water ice, other than "mellow" alpine gullies on the sly, for over 20 years, but when Pomerance asked at the party, I figured I wasn't going to find a nicer, more cautious or well prepared partner.

He's now a senior citizen and that 'ole gorilla is strong as an ox, steady as a Clydesdale. Check 'im out:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 10:14pm PT
Well jeepers,
I guess that lil’ bit of thread drift with Jello didn’t really cover up the fact that Jaybro just outed me.

Ya, you know: Randonee is French for: “Can’t Tele”. That’s why people that do Randonee try to pass it off with the American not so slight of hand acronym, “A.T.”. Yah, Alpine Touring my arse.

Well that’s what it is to be a Blown Out Climber: you gotta get in line behind other activities, say more aerobic stuff, like cycling, ski touring, banging yer fuchin’ head against the wall and the like.

But I digress, it’s true, I can’t make a tele turn worth beans.
Jaybro said it.
I live it.
Done.
Besides, when your humpin’ it up and down and up and down trails in the woods, it’s too narrow to turn, so yah gots 2 groups of options when a turn is required, both involving violent contact with the snow:
A) “The hip & shoulder check” (down baby, down to dah groun')
B) “The tree grab & face plant” (the less favored but equally effective group)


So Jello, maybe you could get your fat red marker out, cuz I might have some discernable shots of Apache’s South Face, as well as some side shots of the Shoshoni Massif. You know, products of todays Ski & Ogle. I’d like to get up there with a real lens; anyhow, it was an exemplary day!

But first, I passed by N & S Arapahoe Peaks, which are 13’ sumthin’ers:



And Yah, does anybody know if these are, like CAT tracks?

Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 4, 2007 - 10:19pm PT
Roy,
I was coming over the hill into Boulder today at sunset and was looking at your divide route. That’s a significant distance! Great solo adventure and very well told. How many days was it? I lost count.
Did the Commando Run a couple of years ago and it’s a long outing as well. Very impressive for your first tour on AT gear.
Rick
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 10:21pm PT
Here’s the goods, in progressively tighter panorama:

This takes in L to R Kiowa, Navajo (just right), Pawnee, Toll, Paiute, Audubon (all 3 grouped right of center), Meeker & Longs (far right):



This shows L to R, Kiowa all the way to Audubon (on the far right), with Arikaree, Navajo, Apache & Shoshoni grouped left of center:



And last, Arikaree, Navajo (really Niwot Ridge, with Navajo’s summit in the back), Apache, & Shoshoni:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 10:24pm PT
I was out on that tour of the divide for two 12 hour days Rick.
No doddling & it was an elevated experience, hahaha!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2007 - 10:27pm PT
Arikaree:



Apache:



Shoshoni:

Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Mar 5, 2007 - 01:32am PT
Tar, sort of like ol' man river, you just keep rumblin' along the rabble.

On the left is a route I did with Steve Dieckoff. And on the right is the approximate line of a solo. Because we're looking obliquely, the lines are not very accurate.


bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 5, 2007 - 11:30am PT
Tar wrote: And Yah, does anybody know if these are, like CAT tracks?


They are Bobcat.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 5, 2007 - 02:52pm PT
Hey neat Bob, nice to get an educated report on those paws prints.

And thanks for the Doodles Jello; those are some fine lines highlighting some Indian Peaks Wilderness sweet spots.

-Tarabble burbling out, untill the next rubble rumble ogle.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2007 - 12:03am PT
It's true.
That fat lupine hasn't been heard singing yet and there's still white stuff sticking to the ground, so here goes. Not ready, not quite, to move on to “Blown Out Climber Series: Slab Mongering & Mtn Grovels”

Today I decided to ogle the Thunder Lakes Basin, below Mt Alice, which is next door to Pagoda & Longs.

I left on my 17 mile rt tour promptly at 1pm, cuz they said there’d be more daylight on the back end and I’m a believer. I also went per usual, alone, and dint tell anyone where I was going. Ya, that’s how you do it. Then if you get hurt no one can find you.


I thought I might be in luck this time & just drive right on in and walk right up to Mt Alice:



But No Dice.
Here’s Tanima Peak (center) & Mt Alice (right), not far from where I parked the car:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2007 - 12:10am PT
I like ski touring because you get to see shyte all covered in very white snow:



And then you get to make tracks in it, or just follow other tracks mostly:



Plus, the Witches Hair dangling about is cool:

Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Mar 12, 2007 - 12:16am PT
Now you're talkin.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2007 - 12:23am PT
The back, er, South West Sides of Longs Peak & MT Meeker:



About half way in I got a good view of the big face on Mt Alice that everybody, well almost everybody climbs:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2007 - 12:31am PT
Now here's the goods, sort of.
My nose was cold, and it wasn't cold out, but that's another story; that's why I dint line up the pics so great.
So I don' wanna take any crap about it, I'm just sayin' it now.
(of course you know I'm kidding, right?)

But here's the end of today's Rubble Ogle, Thunder Lake, looking up at Mt Alice:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2007 - 12:41am PT
So that's that.
It was a purdy nice day out, given that it was warm enuff to make the snow like a giant slurpy; ya, like a slurpy that was served up after the 7-11 first had a hold up, a police intervention with write up, then you finally get your slurpy.

I was savvy tho. Yup; prepped my tips & tails with fresh glide wax, then rubbed glob stopper wax on my kicker skins, both directions, while they were DRY.

So here's a freebee I shot on the way in; a view from the car along the Peak to Peak Highway, of Sawtooth Peak:


This peak is often visible and very distinctive from various points driving into Boulder.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2007 - 10:49pm PT
72 degrees in Boulder today; what an awesome contrast.
Bring it on!
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Mar 12, 2007 - 10:52pm PT
It was so nice in Boulder today people were spaced out everywhere.
bob d'antonio

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Mar 13, 2007 - 01:15am PT
Climbed in the Rio Grande Gorge...My friend, me and no one else but a few hawks.


Perfect!
Jello

Social climber
No Ut
Mar 13, 2007 - 01:54am PT
Many, many thanks, Roy, for another view of a place I love.
paganmonkeyboy

Trad climber
the blighted lands of hatu
Mar 13, 2007 - 10:15am PT
^^ditto...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2007 - 10:40am PT
Even tho it is marvelously warm here today, there's usualy some significant precip into much of April, so probably more good touring to come, certainly of the Randonee type if that's your bag. But I have a preference for the pure mileage stuff on lightweight gear, so I've never skiid across the Divide into Winter Park and there's that great big one from Crested Butte, over Pearl Pass to Aspen...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 7, 2007 - 11:01am PT
Yup, the April precip just kicked in and the fat flakes are falling again...
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Apr 7, 2007 - 11:27am PT
I used to do that Aspen to Crested Butte run over Pearl pass on my bike. Beautiful area with some very fine Mt Biking. I'll bet that is quite a trek on ski's. Back in the 80's when I lived in aspen for awhile I would ride over from Aspen on Satuday with 50 bucks or so, get dinner some sudds and a bed and breakfast room. In the morning enjoy some of the finest single track riding on the globe then ride back over the pass to Aspen.

Thanks for the memory Tarbuster :)
Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Apr 7, 2007 - 11:34am PT
This thread's about life itself, Tar strikes again!

Any of you CO boys adventure on the W side of RMNP, out by Lakes Nakoni/Nanita? Looked like some good stone over there.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 7, 2007 - 12:34pm PT
Nope;
Done a trip to the West Side,
Into the Hells Canyon for Hiamovi Tower,
But I am aware of the drainage you are taliking about and will get in there this year.

It is going to be a mind blowing spring in the high peaks this year.
We've got that good lush growth thing poking through all over in the foothills right now, fruit tree blossoms down low...
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Apr 7, 2007 - 12:58pm PT
"Yup, the April precip just kicked in and the fat flakes are falling again..."

Ok, I'm happy for all of you in CO, but could you spare some snow and send it back our way in CA, please?

Bone dry. I'm missing the big snow falls of the last 2 years here. This global warming sucks dry that is for sure.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 7, 2007 - 01:15pm PT
Well,
The best I can do Klimm Daddy is share the wealth,
Here's the view to the west from behind my keyboard and out yonder window this very moment:



...And off the front porch in November:



But back to my view to the SW:



It's that transitional time and I'm taking a break, coiling up and getting ready to strike out once more...
..And Lisa is tapering for the Boston Marthon next weekend, which means a 5 mile "recovery" run.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Apr 7, 2007 - 01:37pm PT
Tar,

Way to rub it in.

We just got back from Bishop late last night and the Sierras look like late June on a good year, but we are at the start of April!

Got some turns at Mammoth, but unless we get some more late season storms it looks as though these are the last turns for me in the Sierras this season. I hope not. Hoping for a miracle.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 7, 2007 - 01:54pm PT
Either way, we've got the timeless cracks of Woodson steadfastly converging with you an me and the others on the 28th right?
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Apr 7, 2007 - 02:10pm PT
Yep,

The rock is always in season :-))

Just a few more finger tip push-ups on the keyboard and I'll be ready . . .
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 7, 2007 - 08:38pm PT
nice views from your place Tar, thanks for sharing.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2007 - 02:14pm PT
Today it is snowing steady and light, with the big flakes lofting down this morning.

Everything was covered in a beautiful rime testerday.
As it had snowed some, I lazed about and thought about strapping into my touring skis.



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2007 - 02:30pm PT
The winter base is still pretty good up high, but for the last few weeks a lot of the trails starting at 9’500 have been thinned out and either sloggy or icy.

But the last few days brought 7.5 inches of new snow, so I left the car at 3pm yesterday, with no headlamp, just to be sure I'd keep my pace up for the 11 mile round trip ski to Yankee Doodle Lake and get back in before dark.



My route hadn't been tracked for a while and the old snow was nicely mantled in fresh, so I had good conditions for speed.

Looking back onto some of the lower elevation terrain:



The new snow just before arriving at the open rises at Yankee Doodle Lake, 10’500’:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2007 - 02:40pm PT

The view from my turnaround point, in the cirque at Yankee Doodle, just under the Continental Divide.

The fine rubble of James Peak, 13,294' which has little in the way of rock routes to recommend it, but 3 good gullies:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2007 - 02:50pm PT

A pair of little buddies, staking their claim to life way up high:



...And some regal 'ole dads back down by Eldora Ski Resort at the end of the tour:


Chiloe

Trad climber
Lee, NH
Apr 8, 2007 - 03:26pm PT
Off route in a snow thread, but missing Colorado.

Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Apr 8, 2007 - 03:49pm PT
Nice shots, Roy. Where did you start, Eldora?
I made it up to Arapahoe Lakes on Saturday, a very nice outing.
Rick
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2007 - 07:17pm PT
Yes I started in Eldora Rick.
That pano shot looks past Arapahoe Lakes drainage and out toward James.
Raydog

Trad climber
Boulder
Apr 8, 2007 - 07:19pm PT
when I start touring I know who to talk to
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 8, 2007 - 07:26pm PT
Ya Ray I remember some of my first days on the lifts at Eldora was with you.

Just got off the hill an hour ago; last day open this season.
There was new snow, but by the end of the day the sun came out and at 4pm it was so warm it was like skiing deep sand...
Prod

Trad climber
Apr 24, 2011 - 09:36pm PT
Bump.
DM88T

climber
Dave Tully SanDimas,California
Feb 3, 2017 - 11:14am PT

bump for off the beaten path Indian Peaks wanderings
Messages 1 - 126 of total 126 in this topic
Return to Forum List
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Recent Route Beta