Mount Asgard Info

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LeoK

climber
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 15, 2019 - 01:50pm PT
Hey, everyone!

I'm a science fiction author, looking for some information on Mount Asgard (Baffin Island) that I haven't been able to find in other sources. Namely:

(1) Do I understand correctly that the twin peaks are about 1km above the valley floor? (The elevation above the sea level being, of course, the well-known figure of ~2km).

(2) What's the difference between the twin peaks' height? I understand the northern one is a bit taller.

(3) How far below the twin peaks' tops is the saddle? I don't need a precise number, just something like a multiple of hundred feet (1? 2? doesn't look very much on photos). How hard is the climb from the saddle to a top?

(4) What can you see from the saddle and/or the tops? Is Summit Lake visible? Can you see Mount Odin and/or Thor? If looking east, is Mount Midgard visible?

Thanks in advance.
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Mar 15, 2019 - 02:04pm PT
You can answer these questions using Google Earth faster than you could have typed them in!

except for the difficulty of the line out of the saddle. 5.7
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Mar 15, 2019 - 03:05pm PT
I haven't climbed Mt. Asgard, so can't answer your questions about the view from the top, but I've climbed in that area, and can give you a couple of views. You can probably get information about the actual climbs, and the distance from the notch, in Mark Synnott's guidebook. (available on amazon)

Photo below is of the west (actually sort of northwest) side of Mt. Asgard. And note that the whole thing is Mt. Asgard, not just the two towers.

West side of Mt. Asgard
West side of Mt. Asgard
Credit: Ghost


Below is a view of Mt. Asgard from the southeast. Again, note that whole massif running left from the two towers is part of the same mountain. The big lump on the right is the edge of Mt. Freya.

SE side of Mt Asgard from the summit of Mt. Tyr
SE side of Mt Asgard from the summit of Mt. Tyr
Credit: Ghost
Ian Parsons

climber
UK, England
Mar 15, 2019 - 06:31pm PT
(3) According to an account written shortly thereafter - hence probably more reliable than memory - it required three long rappels to descend from the North Peak to the col. Ropes used would have been 150ft/45m. So likely 350-400ft.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Mar 15, 2019 - 07:25pm PT
You could also ask James Bond.

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 15, 2019 - 10:10pm PT
^^^^ Who has posted here although not in a while.
LeoK

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 16, 2019 - 07:29am PT
Thanks, guys!

Nice photos. I hope to visit the place myself, one day.
LeoK

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 21, 2019 - 08:18am PT
Another question, if you don't mind.

I understand that snowstorms on Baffin Island can be quite severe. What is the main danger from a snowstorm during an ascent? Let's say, on the route from the notch to one of the peaks that I mentioned (400-500ft, 5.7-5.8, right?). Is it the sheer force of wind that can blow them off? The snow in the air reducing visibility? The cold? The rock becoming slippery? I imagine all of those play a part, but what would be the main concern and any measures to mitigate the danger?

Also, any lightnings on Baffin Island? Or is a rare thing?
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