Rescue Video Mount Watkins October 27

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Messages 21 - 37 of total 37 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
Sands Motel , Las Vegas
Nov 3, 2018 - 09:17am PT
No wonder Braun is so hostile...I aologize and take back everything i said about you werner...rott brain.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Nov 3, 2018 - 01:29pm PT
Could barely see the waterfall..........

if you don't see it anymore in this lifetime, you'll see it in the next one, and don't be late
kingtut

climber
Jingus Newroutaineer
Nov 3, 2018 - 02:13pm PT
Strong work.
johntp

Trad climber
Little Rock and Loving It
Nov 3, 2018 - 03:06pm PT
Definitely pro's in action.

Would like to know what precipitated the rescue.
thebravecowboy

climber
The Good Places
Nov 3, 2018 - 07:10pm PT
hats off!

absolute professionals, absolutely solid for folks in their moment of utmost need.

those cops are nothing short of angelic. wow!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Nov 3, 2018 - 09:09pm PT
Amazing.
Robert L

climber
Nov 4, 2018 - 01:05am PT
Cool video.

Bonus that they had good light, that the injured party was conscious.

So what should an injured party do to help SAR if they were to find themselves on the receiving end in a high angle rescue on a wall. Asking for a friend

I’ve done the CASA Air Winch endorsement. We looked at a bunch of scenarios where the rescuers job is made harder. It is helpful to:

Have your clothing zipped-up and tidy. Make sure not to have any gear dangling losely that may snag. Avoid the temptation to be doing things like holding a camera to video your rescue when they are coming for you. Essentially, have everything that is not essential to being rescued packed away securely.

Anticipate the injured person(s) being rescued first

If a weighted high line is being used, it’s helpful for the being-rescued party to coil it in a way that avoids snagging.

If using torches, try not to shine torches directly into rescuers eyes as they arrive.

When the rescuer arrives, allow them to assert control of the situation If you want to make them aware of something, avoid talking over them, wait till they have finished speaking.

After being placed in a strop, try to keep your arms down, or otherwise as directed.

When you arrive at the cabin, follow the rescue teams directions. Let them pull you towards them unless they tell you to do otherwise. Make your actions clear - moving too fast or unpredictably can make the situation more complex than it needs to be.

Let them know you are grateful.

Bad Climber

Trad climber
The Lawless Border Regions
Nov 4, 2018 - 06:46am PT
Whoa. So wild. "Spin 'im and pin 'im!" Love it. A great crew and so glad everyone is out safe.

BAd
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 6, 2018 - 01:46pm PT
bump
wbw

Trad climber
'cross the great divide
Nov 6, 2018 - 07:49pm PT
If I'm guessing correctly, that is a place on the route where route finding is quite tricky. A few pitches above the Sheraton Watkins seems about right. I remember my partner leading off not really having a good sense of where the route went, but making it work.

At 3:10, the chopper is very close to the cliff getting the uninjured climber out. The Minimum! warning goes off, and it is almost reminiscent of those proximity wing suit videos where the flyer is soo close to the wall. The swing out from the wall a half mile above Tenaya Canyon must be scarier than shite!
Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Nov 8, 2018 - 03:22am PT
The rest of the story

“The top piece that I had popped out and then it kind of had a trigger effect on the rest of the gear you had,” said Vincent Worth. “Once it popped, then I started dropping, then I can hear the other pieces pop, and then I start going farther and farther, kind of tumbling out of control.”


https://denver.cbslocal.com/2018/11/07/yosemite-climber-grateful-rescue-crews/
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss On the End of a Wet Fist
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 8, 2018 - 07:28am PT
^^^^^^ Thanks for that link, it wraps up the whole story, nicely.
mooch

Trad climber
Tribal Base Camp (Riverkern Annex)
Nov 8, 2018 - 08:11am PT
"Minimums" ....."Minimums".....

The voice of Garmin's HTAWS FLTA integrated system. I love avionics! ;)
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Nov 8, 2018 - 10:26am PT
How does it derive the horizontal clearances? Some kind of side scanning lidar/radar I'm assuming?

Amazing work.
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Nov 8, 2018 - 02:35pm PT
I showed the video to my commercial pilot (fixed wing) brother and he thought the warning was from a radar altimeter that points straight down. You can apparently set it for any minimum, say 50 feet. He guessed that it was set off by proximity to the wall, perhaps when the body of the helicopter tilted a bit.

Good idea to have one of those units pointing sideways for mountain rescue, if it's not already in use.

He also jokingly noted that the pilot talked about the challenge of cross controlling (which a helicopter pilot who posts here said was, "having to input both cyclic and peddle pressure against the wind or backwash from the wall to keep from being pushed away"), but the winch guy was like,

"yeah, yeah, enough of that pilot stuff, I'm busy". :)
Bob Harrington

climber
Bishop, California
Nov 8, 2018 - 06:40pm PT
Here’s one that CHP H-82 and Inyo SAR did this summer in the Palisades.

https://youtu.be/7Vy0RT6PJao
HeldUp

climber
Former YNP VIP Ranger
Nov 15, 2018 - 01:56pm PT
Honored to work and live with those guys back in 1986. Simply incredible.
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