RIP Anthony Bourdain

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 81 - 100 of total 114 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 11, 2018 - 10:25am PT
Several people, family and friends have called me to talk about Tony's death. I am not sad or surprised. It is a tough business. Overworked, under-payed, and under-appreciated, but sharing that with some of the most amazing souls I have ever encountered.

I have not read his famous book nor will I. It hits too close to home. My older brother hung himself so there is that anguish too. And then there are the Mexicans, whose plight I am all to familiar with. This is no tragedy but a life well lived by an honest man unafraid to suffer the realities of soulful living.

Please don't take food or the gathering for meals shared for granted.

God bless you, Tony.
hb81

climber
Jun 11, 2018 - 03:10pm PT

That was very well written. He hit the nail on the head about addiction and depression - from my personal experience anyway.

The "alone" someone feels while they are the center of attention in a huge crowd. That alone. That cold-alone that is more alone and cold than you'd be if you were strapped to Voyager One like a dark frosty vacuum-dried interplanetary hood ornament of freezer-burned meat. That alone that isn't even black – because at least you can lose yourself in blackness. Blackness and darkness at least has quiet and tranquility.

Yup...
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Jun 11, 2018 - 04:06pm PT
Thanks for posting that. He sheds some light on stuff that is out of my frame of reference. Things I don't understand and so never would have thought about without reading that.
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 11, 2018 - 04:24pm PT
Thanks for posting that. He sheds some light on stuff that is out of my frame of reference. Things I don't understand and so never would have thought about without reading that.

Unless one has dealt with the burden of addiction it is hard to relate to the demons being dealt with.
rockermike

Trad climber
Berkeley
Jun 12, 2018 - 12:12am PT
I had never heard of Bourdain before he died and I know nothing about drugs nor fame... but the essay, while well written, doesn't ring true to me. Have other, perhaps closer friends expressed a similar understanding of his struggle? F*#k I know as they say.
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Mill Valley, Ca
Jun 12, 2018 - 08:03am PT
Unless one has dealt with the burden of addiction it is hard to relate to the demons being dealt with.

Same is true for depression.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Jun 12, 2018 - 11:45am PT
"The Normal Existential Angst of the Mundane" (TM) can be too much to bear. That article points right to it without using that label.




Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Jun 12, 2018 - 04:38pm PT
Lot of armchair psychologists here.
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Mill Valley, Ca
Jun 12, 2018 - 05:20pm PT
Lot of armchair psychologists here.

And you are...
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Jun 12, 2018 - 05:23pm PT
lacking enough info to make assumptions.
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Mill Valley, Ca
Jun 12, 2018 - 09:15pm PT
Thank you for enlightening us.
xCon

Social climber
909
Jun 13, 2018 - 02:01pm PT
sonali Kolhatkar's take over at pacifica radio


a more substanced look you wont find elsewhere

http://www.risingupwithsonali.com/food-politics-and-journalism-anthony-bourdains-legacy/


Anthony Bourdain’s genius was not in the kitchen. His genius was in never mincing words and knowing which side he was on. Asked what he would serve at a summit between Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump, Bourdain said, “Hemlock.” He told David Duke, “I’d be happy to rearrange your knee or other extremities.” After visiting Cambodia, Bourdain wrote of Henry Kissinger — “that treacherous, prevaricating, murderous scumbag” — “you’ll never stop wanting to beat [him] to death with your bare hands.”



https://www.jacobinmag.com/2018/06/anthony-bourdain-parts-unknown-obituary
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 13, 2018 - 07:59pm PT
A man certain about what is right and wrong.

Oftentimes, THAT brings great pain and suffering--not only for oneself but also for others.
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 13, 2018 - 08:07pm PT
Lot of armchair psychologists here.

What I posted as a recovering alcoholic is not armchair. Any addiction, substance abuse, depression or any other mental illness is something no one else can grasp.
Gorgeous George

Trad climber
Los Angeles, California
Jun 14, 2018 - 01:07pm PT
Anthony Bourdain wrote:

"Americans love Mexican food. We consume nachos, tacos, burritos, tortas, enchiladas, tamales and anything resembling Mexican in enormous quantities. We love Mexican beverages, happily knocking back huge amounts of tequila, mezcal, and Mexican beer every year. We love Mexican people—we sure employ a lot of them. Despite our ridiculously hypocritical attitudes towards immigration, we demand that Mexicans cook a large percentage of the food we eat, grow the ingredients we need to make that food, clean our houses, mow our lawns, wash our dishes, and look after our children. As any chef will tell you, our entire service economy—the restaurant business as we know it—in most American cities, would collapse overnight without Mexican workers. Some, of course, like to claim that Mexicans are “stealing American jobs.” But in two decades as a chef and employer, I never had ONE American kid walk in my door and apply for a dishwashing job, a porter’s position—or even a job as a prep cook. Mexicans do much of the work in this country that Americans, probably, simply won’t do.

We love Mexican drugs. Maybe not you personally, but “we”, as a nation, certainly consume titanic amounts of them—and go to extraordinary lengths and expense to acquire them. We love Mexican music, Mexican beaches, Mexican architecture, interior design, Mexican films.

So, why don’t we love Mexico?

We throw up our hands and shrug at what happens and what is happening just across the border. Maybe we are embarrassed. Mexico, after all, has always been there for us, to service our darkest needs and desires. Whether it’s dress up like fools and get passed-out drunk and sunburned on spring break in Cancun, throw pesos at strippers in Tijuana, or get toasted on Mexican drugs, we are seldom on our best behavior in Mexico. They have seen many of us at our worst. They know our darkest desires.

In the service of our appetites, we spend billions and billions of dollars each year on Mexican drugs—while at the same time spending billions and billions more trying to prevent those drugs from reaching us. The effect on our society is everywhere to be seen. Whether it’s kids nodding off and overdosing in small town Vermont, gang violence in L.A., burned out neighborhoods in Detroit—it’s there to see. What we don’t see, however, haven’t really noticed, and don’t seem to much care about, is the 80,000 dead in Mexico, just in the past few years—mostly innocent victims. Eighty thousand families who’ve been touched directly by the so-called “War On Drugs”.

Mexico. Our brother from another mother. A country, with whom, like it or not, we are inexorably, deeply involved, in a close but often uncomfortable embrace. Look at it. It’s beautiful. It has some of the most ravishingly beautiful beaches on earth. Mountains, desert, jungle. Beautiful colonial architecture, a tragic, elegant, violent, ludicrous, heroic, lamentable, heartbreaking history. Mexican wine country rivals Tuscany for gorgeousness. Its archeological sites—the remnants of great empires, unrivaled anywhere. And as much as we think we know and love it, we have barely scratched the surface of what Mexican food really is. It is NOT melted cheese over tortilla chips. It is not simple, or easy. It is not simply “bro food” at halftime. It is in fact, old—older even than the great cuisines of Europe, and often deeply complex, refined, subtle, and sophisticated. A true mole sauce, for instance, can take DAYS to make, a balance of freshly (always fresh) ingredients painstakingly prepared by hand. It could be, should be, one of the most exciting cuisines on the planet, if we paid attention. The old school cooks of Oaxaca make some of the more difficult and nuanced sauces in gastronomy. And some of the new generation—many of whom have trained in the kitchens of America and Europe—have returned home to take Mexican food to new and thrilling heights.

It’s a country I feel particularly attached to and grateful for. In nearly 30 years of cooking professionally, just about every time I walked into a new kitchen, it was a Mexican guy who looked after me, had my back, showed me what was what, and was there—and on the case—when the cooks like me, with backgrounds like mine, ran away to go skiing or surfing or simply flaked. I have been fortunate to track where some of those cooks come from, to go back home with them. To small towns populated mostly by women—where in the evening, families gather at the town’s phone kiosk, waiting for calls from their husbands, sons and brothers who have left to work in our kitchens in the cities of the North. I have been fortunate enough to see where that affinity for cooking comes from, to experience moms and grandmothers preparing many delicious things, with pride and real love, passing that food made by hand from their hands to mine.

In years of making television in Mexico, it’s one of the places we, as a crew, are happiest when the day’s work is over. We’ll gather around a street stall and order soft tacos with fresh, bright, delicious salsas, drink cold Mexican beer, sip smoky mezcals, and listen with moist eyes to sentimental songs from street musicians. We will look around and remark, for the hundredth time, what an extraordinary place this is.

The received wisdom is that Mexico will never change. That is hopelessly corrupt, from top to bottom. That it is useless to resist—to care, to hope for a happier future. But there are heroes out there who refuse to go along. On this episode of “Parts Unknown,” we meet a few of them. People who are standing up against overwhelming odds, demanding accountability, demanding change—at great, even horrifying personal cost."

Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Jun 14, 2018 - 02:50pm PT
So, why don’t we love Mexico?

I love Mexico and have traveled and worked extensively there. I love Mexicans and have welcomed them in my home and family life. Speaking of which I love how Mexicans cherish family.

The women are hot. The men are brave. They all work their asses off, even the lazy ones!

I'm pro-immigration and pro-NAFTA and anti-wall.

Also I worked as a dishwasher for a couple of years in a greasy spoon though admittedly it more than 30 years ago.

I guess I'm a bad American.

DMT
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 15, 2018 - 05:57pm PT
Anthony Bourdain's gone. But Guy Fieri's still with us.

Beam me up, Scotty. No signs of intelligent life down here.
xCon

Social climber
909
Jun 15, 2018 - 06:10pm PT
his sh#t list was the most credible in his industry

a quote of his about dying regrets is worth reading...
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 16, 2018 - 07:39am PT
xCon,

Anyone’s dying regrets is worth reading.

I'd say that most of ours will be about those we love and loved.
xCon

Social climber
909
Jun 16, 2018 - 03:02pm PT
“[When I die], I will decidedly not be regretting missed opportunities for a good time. My regrets will be more along the lines of a sad list of people hurt, people let down, assets wasted and advantages squandered.”

― Anthony Bourdain, Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly

https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/691669-when-i-die-i-will-decidedly-not-be-regretting-missed
Messages 81 - 100 of total 114 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Recent Route Beta