RIP Anthony Bourdain

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Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Mill Valley, Ca
Jun 12, 2018 - 09:15pm PT
Thank you for enlightening us.
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 13, 2018 - 07:59pm PT
A man certain about what is right and wrong.

Oftentimes, THAT brings great pain and suffering--not only for oneself but also for others.
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 13, 2018 - 08:07pm PT
Lot of armchair psychologists here.

What I posted as a recovering alcoholic is not armchair. Any addiction, substance abuse, depression or any other mental illness is something no one else can grasp.
Gorgeous George

Trad climber
Los Angeles, California
Jun 14, 2018 - 01:07pm PT
Anthony Bourdain wrote:

"Americans love Mexican food. We consume nachos, tacos, burritos, tortas, enchiladas, tamales and anything resembling Mexican in enormous quantities. We love Mexican beverages, happily knocking back huge amounts of tequila, mezcal, and Mexican beer every year. We love Mexican people—we sure employ a lot of them. Despite our ridiculously hypocritical attitudes towards immigration, we demand that Mexicans cook a large percentage of the food we eat, grow the ingredients we need to make that food, clean our houses, mow our lawns, wash our dishes, and look after our children. As any chef will tell you, our entire service economy—the restaurant business as we know it—in most American cities, would collapse overnight without Mexican workers. Some, of course, like to claim that Mexicans are “stealing American jobs.” But in two decades as a chef and employer, I never had ONE American kid walk in my door and apply for a dishwashing job, a porter’s position—or even a job as a prep cook. Mexicans do much of the work in this country that Americans, probably, simply won’t do.

We love Mexican drugs. Maybe not you personally, but “we”, as a nation, certainly consume titanic amounts of them—and go to extraordinary lengths and expense to acquire them. We love Mexican music, Mexican beaches, Mexican architecture, interior design, Mexican films.

So, why don’t we love Mexico?

We throw up our hands and shrug at what happens and what is happening just across the border. Maybe we are embarrassed. Mexico, after all, has always been there for us, to service our darkest needs and desires. Whether it’s dress up like fools and get passed-out drunk and sunburned on spring break in Cancun, throw pesos at strippers in Tijuana, or get toasted on Mexican drugs, we are seldom on our best behavior in Mexico. They have seen many of us at our worst. They know our darkest desires.

In the service of our appetites, we spend billions and billions of dollars each year on Mexican drugs—while at the same time spending billions and billions more trying to prevent those drugs from reaching us. The effect on our society is everywhere to be seen. Whether it’s kids nodding off and overdosing in small town Vermont, gang violence in L.A., burned out neighborhoods in Detroit—it’s there to see. What we don’t see, however, haven’t really noticed, and don’t seem to much care about, is the 80,000 dead in Mexico, just in the past few years—mostly innocent victims. Eighty thousand families who’ve been touched directly by the so-called “War On Drugs”.

Mexico. Our brother from another mother. A country, with whom, like it or not, we are inexorably, deeply involved, in a close but often uncomfortable embrace. Look at it. It’s beautiful. It has some of the most ravishingly beautiful beaches on earth. Mountains, desert, jungle. Beautiful colonial architecture, a tragic, elegant, violent, ludicrous, heroic, lamentable, heartbreaking history. Mexican wine country rivals Tuscany for gorgeousness. Its archeological sites—the remnants of great empires, unrivaled anywhere. And as much as we think we know and love it, we have barely scratched the surface of what Mexican food really is. It is NOT melted cheese over tortilla chips. It is not simple, or easy. It is not simply “bro food” at halftime. It is in fact, old—older even than the great cuisines of Europe, and often deeply complex, refined, subtle, and sophisticated. A true mole sauce, for instance, can take DAYS to make, a balance of freshly (always fresh) ingredients painstakingly prepared by hand. It could be, should be, one of the most exciting cuisines on the planet, if we paid attention. The old school cooks of Oaxaca make some of the more difficult and nuanced sauces in gastronomy. And some of the new generation—many of whom have trained in the kitchens of America and Europe—have returned home to take Mexican food to new and thrilling heights.

It’s a country I feel particularly attached to and grateful for. In nearly 30 years of cooking professionally, just about every time I walked into a new kitchen, it was a Mexican guy who looked after me, had my back, showed me what was what, and was there—and on the case—when the cooks like me, with backgrounds like mine, ran away to go skiing or surfing or simply flaked. I have been fortunate to track where some of those cooks come from, to go back home with them. To small towns populated mostly by women—where in the evening, families gather at the town’s phone kiosk, waiting for calls from their husbands, sons and brothers who have left to work in our kitchens in the cities of the North. I have been fortunate enough to see where that affinity for cooking comes from, to experience moms and grandmothers preparing many delicious things, with pride and real love, passing that food made by hand from their hands to mine.

In years of making television in Mexico, it’s one of the places we, as a crew, are happiest when the day’s work is over. We’ll gather around a street stall and order soft tacos with fresh, bright, delicious salsas, drink cold Mexican beer, sip smoky mezcals, and listen with moist eyes to sentimental songs from street musicians. We will look around and remark, for the hundredth time, what an extraordinary place this is.

The received wisdom is that Mexico will never change. That is hopelessly corrupt, from top to bottom. That it is useless to resist—to care, to hope for a happier future. But there are heroes out there who refuse to go along. On this episode of “Parts Unknown,” we meet a few of them. People who are standing up against overwhelming odds, demanding accountability, demanding change—at great, even horrifying personal cost."

Dingus Milktoast

Trad climber
Minister of Moderation, Fatcrackistan
Jun 14, 2018 - 02:50pm PT
So, why don’t we love Mexico?

I love Mexico and have traveled and worked extensively there. I love Mexicans and have welcomed them in my home and family life. Speaking of which I love how Mexicans cherish family.

The women are hot. The men are brave. They all work their asses off, even the lazy ones!

I'm pro-immigration and pro-NAFTA and anti-wall.

Also I worked as a dishwasher for a couple of years in a greasy spoon though admittedly it more than 30 years ago.

I guess I'm a bad American.

DMT
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 15, 2018 - 05:57pm PT
Anthony Bourdain's gone. But Guy Fieri's still with us.

Beam me up, Scotty. No signs of intelligent life down here.
MikeL

Social climber
Southern Arizona
Jun 16, 2018 - 07:39am PT
xCon,

Anyone’s dying regrets is worth reading.

I'd say that most of ours will be about those we love and loved.
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Jun 17, 2018 - 09:05am PT
Binge watched CNN last night and their showing of Parts Unknown episodes.

We ended with Borneo from Season 6 from 2015. I'd seen it before but to re-watch in light of his passing...made it even more...dark.

Amazing.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jun 17, 2018 - 09:15am PT
I will certainly miss his show
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Jun 17, 2018 - 10:53am PT
Just read KC again. Guy had a be-bop style that only drifted off course when he goosed the gonzo element too hard. Such a blast to read. Looked forward to every session like a fine meal.
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Jun 25, 2018 - 09:57am PT
A short poignant piece by Jordan Peterson (clinical psychologist) re suicide...



https://youtu.be/sBZi4Qb_59s

"Here is @jordanbpeterson answering my question Friday night. If anyone feels this way too, PLEASE listen to him. I have replayed this over and over again."

https://twitter.com/chadjustin98
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Jun 25, 2018 - 12:20pm PT
Hard to say, but you can say for sure you won't find any Pharma ads for new black-box warning bearing psych meds on those article pages.
Lennox

climber
in the land of the blind
Jun 25, 2018 - 12:50pm PT
It’s not just anti-depressants that can increase one’s risk of suicidal ideation:

https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/6/14/17458726/depression-drugs-suicide-side-effect
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Jun 26, 2018 - 10:03am PT
"In the words of Nietzsche, 'He who has a why to live can bear almost any how.' People are constantly striving to reach their potential, and when they think they can do better, it often creates a feeling of uneasiness. Contentment is found when one feels they are making the best decision in their current situation. In previous times, global communication systems such as the Internet, television, and phones did not exist. Because of this, people were refined to their immediate environment, making one’s meaning relatively clear. An example of this is a child that was born into a family on a farm. The child was most likely going to work on the farm throughout his life because his family needed him in order to keep the farm running efficiently. If on the odd chance he did have the ability to leave the farm, his other options were limited to a select few. Now, with virtually all information globalized, people see and have access to unlimited opportunities and paths in life, giving the impression that fame and fortune are only right around the corner. Although this wide variety of choices is beneficial to some, it can leave the common person overwhelmed, always questioning their current path. This questioning occurs because they are constantly comparing themselves to a select few ultra successful individuals. Although these outliers seem to be in no way different from you, they are usually products of a combination of the right timing, genetics, and environment. In my opinion, the constant display of these extremely successful people’s lives across a global scale can easily lead one to believe that they are not living up to what they could or should be. This envy causes frustration and disappointment, which most definitely play a role in the growing depression and suicide rates across the world. The bottom line is that people need both concrete meaning and direction in their lives, and this becomes nearly impossible with the overload of information and opportunities we now have access to. But we can create our own sense of meaning through the realization that each person’s life is unique. If people can learn to step back, not be so comparative, and focus on what we as individuals can control, we can live happy and meaningful lives."

Sean Montaigne
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBZi4Qb_59s
Touque

Trad climber
Santacruzcalif
Jun 26, 2018 - 01:02pm PT
To everyone out there it's never that bad just talk to someone!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 2, 2018 - 10:28am PT

Nietzsche's "Amor fati" can be compared to Brene Browns words: "Children are not born into this world to be perfect, they are hard-wired for struggle". Happy people are not happy because they are perfect, but because they embrace their imperfections...

I will not get into what Nietzsche says about the last humans and their state of "we-are-happy"-ness...
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Jul 12, 2018 - 01:12pm PT
I'm not seeing anything other than his re-tweets on his twitter feed from 2 May. What am I missing?

He actually said:

Anthony Bourdain

Verified account

@Bourdain
Follow Follow @Bourdain
More
Replying to @jeffhulme @talleststone
..and I am in no way an HRC fan. I’ve been on the receiving end of her operatives’ wrath. And it ain’t fun,

4:37 PM - 2 May 2018
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
ne'er–do–well
Aug 28, 2018 - 10:07pm PT
couchmaster

climber
Aug 29, 2018 - 09:13am PT



Why would Hillarys "operatives" harass Bourdain? What does that even mean>


"He actually said:

Anthony Bourdain

Verified account

@Bourdain
Follow Follow @Bourdain
More
Replying to @jeffhulme @talleststone
..and I am in no way an HRC fan. I’ve been on the receiving end of her operatives’ wrath. And it ain’t fun,

4:37 PM - 2 May 2018
Brian in SLC

Social climber
Salt Lake City, UT
Aug 29, 2018 - 09:23am PT
He apparently called out HRC on Harvey. "Provoking an irate response from one of her aides."

The conspiracy folks of course made hay.

Slowly working my way through Kitchen Confidential...great read. Really reminds me of his voice on his shows. Weird, but, reading it is almost like a book on tape.
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