2 Climber Falls in JT this weekend

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FreeCoffee

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Dec 4, 2017 - 07:39am PT
1) White Rasta -climber fell off the top move and yes hit the boulder. Resulted in an open tib/fib fracture. Interestingly enough same climber had sent on lead Hot Rocks earlier in the day. Said he's going to keep to climbing on ropes from now on. (Friday 12/1)

2) Lost Horse Wall - female climber fell near the top of The Swift at sunset. Ended up near where Dappled Mare and Bird on a Wire merge. Some gear may have pulled. Injuries unclear. JOSAR was staged and ready, but due to the extent of the injuries and the time of day, California Highway Patrol lowered a paramedic to the patient, then extracted them both. (Sat 12/2)

Big thanks to all the bystanders who helped out on both of these rescues.

The Emergency Phone at Intersection Rock was used to call for help during both these incidents. Next time you are in the park, find it, and show your friends. Cell phone service is unreliable
Bad Climber

Trad climber
The Lawless Border Regions
Dec 4, 2017 - 07:49am PT
Whoa. Sounds like folks are going to recover. Be careful out there, kids.

Yikes.

BAd
zip

Trad climber
pacific beach, ca
Dec 4, 2017 - 08:04am PT
3) Climber Coffee participant fell over boulder next to table, knocking over info billboard, and spilling coffee all over boulder and himself.
Victim never lost grip of coffee mug, and did not appear to sustain any physical injuries.
Ojai Alex

Trad climber
Ojai, CA
Dec 4, 2017 - 08:06am PT
The phone takes longer than you’d think too. Despite being an ‘Emergency Phone’, it does not connect you to emergency services. It connects you with the rangers office.

So when you launch into your description of the situation and start talking about ‘my patient is A+O times 3 after a brief loss of consciousness’ they’ll have no idea what you’re talking about.

Response time seems to be about 30 minutes, after the rangers finally transfer you to EMS. Something to keep in mind.

Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Dec 4, 2017 - 08:25am PT
Probably good to know what service works and where to get optimal signal.
xCon

Social climber
909
Dec 4, 2017 - 08:29am PT
someone really aught to drag that rock back a ways...
FreeCoffee

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 4, 2017 - 08:55am PT
Emergency Phone is a satellite phone and can take 30 seconds to connect to dispatch. Dispatch Center services all of San Bernardino County - so it is best to have lots of details about where you are and extent of injury if known. They are a more direct link than calling 911. Also, it is a good idea to stage someone at the phone post phonecall to direct emergency traffic to the correct location.

And yes, what Zip described did actually happen at Climber Coffee on Sunday :)
Ojai Alex

Trad climber
Ojai, CA
Dec 4, 2017 - 09:11am PT
I’m sure you’re correct, but when I used the phone in an actual incident, the person on the other side (county dispatch apparently) was not versed in the lingo. I had to start all over and explain in plain English the nature of the emergency, etc. I’ve never had to do that with paramedics or SAR.

SAT phone makes sense given the connection time. My main point was that there is plenty of time for someone to die before help arrives. Have medical skills, know CPR.

Anyway, thanks for your hard work keeping climbers and others safe.
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Dec 4, 2017 - 10:15am PT
Bummer. I'm surprised there aren't more injuries on White Rastafarian though. It's tall, there's a rock below and the top out can be sketchy if you're not used to climbing outside much.
rincon

climber
Coarsegold
Dec 4, 2017 - 11:22am PT
Yup. That guy got to experience the consequences of falling off the top of that thing the way nature intended!
jeff constine

Trad climber
Ao Namao
Dec 4, 2017 - 11:45am PT
LOL ^^^
Mr_T

Trad climber
Northern California
Dec 4, 2017 - 11:56am PT
Is the following for real?

1) There is a boulder in the desert with a moderate problem, that folks really like to climb up (White Rasta).
2) There was a rock at the bottom that someone could have fallen onto.
3) A group of people moved the rock at the base so that someone wouldn't fall onto it.
4) Some other group of people moved the rock back to under at the base knowing that it would increase the chance of injury.
5) A person just fell onto the rock at the base, resulting serious injuries.

And if so, is it really the case that the location of a rock in the desert is more important than the a 20-something male with a life-altering injury?

xCon

Social climber
909
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:08pm PT
the guy has a good case against those whos "construction of an obvious hazard" by their dragging that rock back under the problem resulted in his being bit...
cavemonkey

Ice climber
ak
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:12pm PT
Hmmmmm
Don't know how I feel about this. Remember hearing about the boulder being moved back, and at the time I thought "Good for them!". Now it seems almost malacious.
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:15pm PT
You're a climber going up on a highball and see that there's a boulder beneath it. You either 1) sack up and go for it, assuming the consequences of screwing up, or 2) decide that you'd rather not risk it and do something else. Sounds like our poor injured friend decided on the latter. His choice, not yours'.
Mr_T

Trad climber
Northern California
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:21pm PT
What really irritates me here is that this concerns a boulder problem that is absurdly far from the edge of the sport. It's a V3. It may have been cutting edge in 1963, but a far cry by today's standards. The forefront of today is what, V15/5.15? People do V10+ high balls out in Bishop all the time.

There seems to be some members of the community that can't handle a few people enjoying a fun, beginner boulder problem on a sunny afternoon. They have been eclipsed by later generations and they just cannot deal.

And yes, it does affect all of us as JOSAR probably spent a few thousand tax dollars to deal with the mess. It impacts all of us.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:34pm PT
Exactly...Mr_T
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:37pm PT
Precisely Mr._T
xCon

Social climber
909
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:39pm PT
how much did they spend moving intersection rock to the other side of the highway?
way runout

Boulder climber
Poway
Dec 4, 2017 - 12:41pm PT
I tend to disagree with most of the old cruster mentality and mock it accordingly (because it’s so easy, for starters…)

but because there are SO many routes to climb and SO many boulders to dry hump, all with varied levels of relative safety - I say leave them alone.

Same argument you’re making, Mr_T, apply to the B&Y? Throw a few extra bolts on? There are much harder routes out there. Isn’t V3 like 5.11?

You don’t get to climb this particular V3 if you flail on V3. Likewise, you don’t get to climb the B&Y if you aren’t confident climbing it.
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