*Spiffy Dolomite Vacation Thread*

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Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Original Post - Sep 16, 2006 - 07:54pm PT

Ok Taco Benders,

Step on up, take a bite, maybe post up a pic or three.
"The Doli's" has it all and the good season just flashed,
So let's have a closer look.




All my snappy shots are from a trip in '92.
Sumtimes I sneek in postcards,
But I tell you when, cuz I'm a straight shooter.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 07:55pm PT
Looking up at the Tre Cime Di Lavaredo

Aerial view of Gruppo Sella & Marmolada:
(Postcard)

Over by the, um, I forget:
(But these "Huts" are called Refugio and have kickasss food, beer & GRAPPA)

Near The Civetta:
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 07:56pm PT
Here's a few bits of advice which may prove helpfull.

1) Partner Selection is Key;
Strong legs, a willing mind, & clear vision
Are among the more desirable attributes, so choose wisely.

Here's mine,
Randi Eyre (RIP '99)

2) Motoring Arrangements;
As The Dolomites are laced with roads.

3) Lodging;
Because It's There.

4) Good Food;
Since the occasional multi-star fuel up is a sure necessity.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 07:57pm PT
As with any trip abroad or outside of your sandbox for that matter,
It is advisable to do as the locals do, ...sometimes.

Here's the Poseur Postur Tarbousier givin' it a try:

I cannot stess how important spiffy transpo becomes,
Not just fer craggin' approaches,
But likewise to see the sights...
(I think this is a Fiat 900)

This is a Lancia Delta HF:
(Pronounced "Lawn-chuh")
(Be aware the I-Talians say things kinda' funny)

Oh Yeah,
Transpo Fer M-Motorin' Over To, Like,
Hip and Pastoral Sights Such As,
Tuscany:
(postcard)

San Gimignano:
(postcard)


And Firenze:
(my shot, mine, mine, mine).
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 07:57pm PT
'K,
There's a bit of common usage (lingo),
Which makes you sound cool when you 'git back stateside,
Like, The Dolomiti can be suavely passed in hip & polite conversation as:
"The Doli's"


Also, Florence is called "Firenze" or some such thing.
('Not sure why).

Alrighty Then;
(Or Now as the Case Might Seem),
I got 'nuff pic-chures teh float this bugger fer a 'lil bit,
But, -and a couple ah craggin' type ones too-

But right now I need to rub Lisa's feet and quaff a brew er two,
So post up some Spiffy Doli Snappys or surf the Taco Stand or whatever, cuz I'll be back.

WBraun

climber
Sep 16, 2006 - 10:52pm PT
That is awesome! You are king!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 10:58pm PT
Thanks Fellas, glad we all have fun in the sandbox these days...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 11:08pm PT
Molto Bene!
(that's how those Italo's say, "right on bro!")

C'Mon Curlie, find yer foto stash and let's rip this dance floor...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2006 - 11:50pm PT
10-4 good buddy.
I'm gonnah meter this one out cuz the doli's are a rarity in terms of input i'm quite sure.

where ya goin' in the indian peaks tehmorrah?
(my knees are down and out this season)..
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Sep 16, 2006 - 11:56pm PT
Wow, what a breath of fresh air. And colorful. Thanks tons.

b e s t !
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 17, 2006 - 12:26am PT
'Glad you enjoy them Peter, lot's more to come.

Stich: Lisa and I have been over to Skyscraper and there are two snow fields, the northerly one (Challenger Glacier) facing Devil's Thumb Pass, the southerly (Skyscraper Glacier) facing Bob and Betty lake. They can be sort of steep; approching 50 degrees and look really fun.

I have seen Skyscraper in the fall set with bare ice; last fall we went up a gully to the East because the bare ice was heavily loaded with fresh snow in late october.

It snowed up here today a bit at 8'200; there would be some fresh accumulation up there at the divide, some, but maybe not significant.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 17, 2006 - 12:43am PT
sounds right.

Here's a little taste of the Doli's,
Looking at the Cima Piccola:
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Sep 17, 2006 - 12:23pm PT
Alright Tarbuster. Here’s some pics from a trip Gramicci© and I took to the Alps in 1976.

North faces of Tre Cima on right; South faces on left.


The tunnels constructed during World War I are incredible. Pitched battles between the Italians and the Austrians were fought among these beautiful peaks. Now there are hiking trails through the tunnels.



Right when we got to the Lavaredo hut in mid August, it snowed about a foot.

Spent several snowbound days hanging out with the Itlalians in the Lavaredo hut. The local Italians explained Grappa to us; Mike explained Hendrix to the Italians with the help of a portable cassette player. Our original goal, the North Faces were out of the question, but the sun came out and we got some climbs in on the south faces. Far right is the Cima Piccolissima and its narrow south face.


Mike on the Cassin Route, south face of the Cima Piccolissima.


The climbing was great: steep and mainly solid.


Mike again.


Mike soloing near the top.


Obligatgory summit shot.

rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Sep 19, 2006 - 01:54pm PT
Nice old photos of the Dolomiti, Ricky! (Good to see Mike wearing a helmet Back in the Day -- something we almost never wore on most USian rock routes back then.)

The next season, I finally headed to the Italian Alps with Rockamazzo. I ended going on a second extended foray from our european "home" at Chamonix that Summer and lucked into some fairly-stable weather at the Tre Cima. With Brock Wagstaff, we managed to do the Comici Route on "la faccia del nord" of the Cima Grande before getting dusted with snow on the summit (and the descent). And, along the way, I think we were able to free all the moves, thanks to the copious amount of fixed gear. Talk about a via ferrata!

(Taken at about the 600' level, maybe.)

Great times, great wine, great limestone...
G_Gnome

Boulder climber
Sick Midget Land
Sep 19, 2006 - 02:03pm PT
Nice football helmet!
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 19, 2006 - 06:10pm PT
Dang, this _is_ a spiffy thread!

Arr....I'll be lookin' about me galleon tonight for that scurvy CD o' mine....and I'll be postin' up some fine pix that'll put all ye home-lubbers ta shame....
Standing Strong

Mountain climber
birds fly over the rainbow, why o why can't i?
Sep 19, 2006 - 08:15pm PT
"transpo"!!!

love it.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2006 - 10:35pm PT
Well there Ricky 'Rocker,
That was a much appreciated shot in the arm to this here cyber-dolomiti-pic-chure&popcorn-fest.

I espeshly enjoy RMuir's Bell motorcycle helmet with twin racing stripes.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2006 - 10:46pm PT
So, Here's a little "Via Ferrata Primer":

Well, this is actually the Tofana,
And the routes indicated are not Via Ferrata,
But it makes a nice chapter header.
This here Fatasss Tofana Crag is just outside Cortina D'ampezzo,
And we began our Via Ferrata lessons on it's left flank.



Via Ferrata means "Iron Way" and the hardened infrastructures,
Such as tunnels, ladders, cables and "staples", were put in during those nasty wars to defend the Italian border.

These days, They make a nice adult jungle gym.
Why here's an Adult Ferrata Aspirant Now:
...I say she looks to be a personage fit out fer a Dr Seuss Tale.


And here's we haves depicted some 'a the cables
Of the Adult Jungle Gymnasium:
(no adult in sight tho)

So ya see, you just aquire a proper lanyard with energy absorption device, a couple lockin' beeny biners and clip that there cable: Bravisimo! Yer scuttlin' 4th class, fairly safely, makin' it look, well, easy! (partly cuz it is ...)
Mike.

climber
Sep 19, 2006 - 10:49pm PT
Just when the Taco Stand appears destined for the boneyard...


Thanks for the nice shots, prose and history, guys. Nice stuff!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2006 - 10:51pm PT

One 'a the neato aspects of these Ferrati (pl?) is the ease with which groups of folks with just moderate skillz
Can just kill it on 4th class and move fairly quickly and unencumbered by belays.

So here we go, into the Tunnels of the Tofana:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2006 - 10:53pm PT

...And out the other side into open territory:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2006 - 11:02pm PT

No sittin' around in the cold belays fer us,
Just leashed in, cabled up 'an boogeyin':


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2006 - 11:06pm PT

This particular route has a nice sub-top-out with grand views of Cortina, far below:

It was a bit too icy for our group to aquire the true summit that day...
dmalloy

Trad climber
eastside
Sep 20, 2006 - 01:00am PT
Mr. Buster, thanks as always for an awesome thread with some thought, education, fun and vicarious thrills. After climbing with some Italians last week here in Cali, I am hungering again to get back there.

And, so as you know for the future....it would be "vie ferrate," with "vie" being the plural of the noun "via" and then the adjective "ferrate" changed to match the noun it is modifying.

Che belle le tre cime!! Che bouno il vino! Andiamo in fretta...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2006 - 01:08am PT
Tre Cime...
Molto Bene!

Vino...
Cin Cin!

Andiamo in Fretta!
Yippee...
Mimi

climber
Sep 20, 2006 - 01:13am PT
Awesome pics you guys!
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 20, 2006 - 02:38am PT
Well, still can't find the missing disk o' pix, so I'm going to be boring and post mostly the same ones I did for the garden gnome's thread on favorite places to climb.

Cortina d'Ampezzo:

Punta Fiames -- the toughest 5.6 I've ever been on. Spectacular arete climb, though, just behind Cortina.

Interesting plaque commemorating someone who died on the route. This huge chunk of steel was at the base of the route, but after a strenuous 1.5 hour hike:

Punta Fiames top, at 9PM, Cortina in the background:

Cool memorials/statues on the way to the Tre Cime di Laveredo:

Yet another pic of the Tre Cime di Laveredo. Didn't one of the Huber bros free solo a route on one of these? Kind of funny seeing someone free solo with a helmet on...

The view from Il Patroni, a peak around the Tre Cime. We were going to do a 4-pitch 5.6 up to the top, but misread the guidebook and ended up going up the via ferrata we were supposed to go down....

Chris on part of the via ferrata on Il Patroni -- note to self: make sure you haven't accidentally hit the b&w button on your camera without noticing.....

Very cool WWII tunnels that were cut through the limestone. These were all over the place, amazing!:

The perfect boulder at the end of a perfect day (well, perfect except for that nasty scramble down nasty scree....)

Yep, the Dolomites were awesome. So...much....rock.... Hopefully I'll get back there next summer for a little bit.
Ron Olsen

Trad climber
Boulder Colorado
Sep 20, 2006 - 09:08am PT
Tre Cime di Lavaredo after an afternoon thunderstorm
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Sep 20, 2006 - 09:31am PT
Royboy, here's the German version of the Via Ferrata, called a klettersteig, up the Hollental to the Zugspitze. The cross at the top still has .50 cal bullet holes in it from WWII.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2006 - 10:54am PT
Yes Pat, that left hand shot with the spikes was the first image I'd seen of this sort of hardware installation in the mountains.

Hey Ron Olson: 'Nice to see another Boulder climber post up.

Way Teh Go Curlie!
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Sep 20, 2006 - 11:32am PT
Grazie!

Tar is one of the only thread authors I will follow without a second thought... adventures in the mountains being assured.

The best thing about talking around the fire at night is having been out and about in the mountains all day. This is SuperTopo at its best.
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 20, 2006 - 12:12pm PT
Wow, that left picture is really cool! There should be more like that one!

I don't know what makes me drool more - thoughts of all the great rocks, or thoughts of all the great food, coffee, and beer....
Hootervillian

climber
the Hooterville World-Guardian
Sep 20, 2006 - 12:25pm PT
that's some life you've led Mr. Buster. here's to ya.
Chris Wegener

Trad climber
St. John, Virgin Islands
Sep 20, 2006 - 03:51pm PT
Some more photos of the Dolomites.
The best part is that the Italians have their priorities straight, they dont open the refugios (huts) until the important items are in adeguate supply, in this case beer.

Then there is the via Ferrattas which let you get into great positions and as this picture shows are a blast!

Or this

Another summit, this time after one of the coolest climbs I have ever done, Pont Fiames near Cortina

Where ever you go the views are killer!

It is the finest climbing trip imaginable. Beauty, climbing from 5.easy to as hard as you want to crank in a setting where your ever wish is catered to.

Chris
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2006 - 05:02pm PT
Let's see, would you be the Chris Wegener from 70's so cal experience, buddies with Pete Steers, Jan Mcollum, Herb Laeger et al?

One of the guys in the 2nd/last fotos looks like him: the dude was an edging master and I recall ascents in suede Desert Boots or Hush Puppys.

'Nice fotos at any rate,
Cheers,
Roy
goatboy smellz

climber
northboulder, co
Sep 21, 2006 - 10:35am PT


OLA, yonder tarbustier.

Autumn flowz down thru sweet valleyz!

Good timez our yet A schmear away...

Time to rope up some obscurities...

Time to rope up some fun!


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2006 - 11:14am PT
Yes, we have a kite to fly!
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Sep 21, 2006 - 11:32am PT
Roy, those spikes you noted are in prime shape in the postcard, but when I found myself walking across them, about every third or fourth one was bent downward, usually at more then 45 degrees from winter avalanches, so you would have to step lightly in the constant mist/rain that plagues that particular part of the Alps.

I'll post up some more euro alps fun stuff later

So, is it true you're gonna be out in Arcadia next month????
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2006 - 11:37am PT
Pat:
We cancelled that trip, I know Sewellymon is expecting us.
See you a bit later at the next JT Bash!

OK Now,
Via Ferrata Primer Part 2:
The steeper and deeper with Refugio Link up
& Weather Dodger option...

This Ferrata has some very airy sections and deposits one on a very large plateau atop the Gruppo Sella.

Along the way you get to see some towers upon which,
Reinhold Messner made some of his earlier first ascents:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2006 - 11:39am PT

As you can see, the steep trail leads to a near v-vertical wall:




Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2006 - 11:42am PT

...and then you begin to mess about and upward on ladders and staples:


Finally to arrive, in our case, upon a welcome respite from lightning and thunder,
Where we sought thick pasta, GRAPPA, warm blankets and a bed for the night.

...To be Continued
graham

Social climber
Ventura, California
Sep 21, 2006 - 12:22pm PT
Hello Chris Wegener,

Nice shots everyone, truly a great place

I particularly like the Transpo (B2 A-star) sling loading the Kegs.

Mike
Chris Wegener

Trad climber
St. John, Virgin Islands
Sep 21, 2006 - 01:32pm PT
Tarbuster--

Yeah that's me. I'm still hanging around lying about my past exploits and remembering how good I used to be. The other guy is Jim Wilson whom I am sure you also remember. Proving that old climbers never die, they just drink more beer.

THe pilot of the chooper was hot, he would drop a load and pick up a new sling in less than 20 seconds. But you can't open the refugio without the necessary supplies.

The Sela towers are great. We did the route that goes up the center of the third pillar, superb!

Here is Jim at the crux, a sweet roof half way up the wall.

and here we are way up near the top. The previous two pitches are dead vertical and 5.4!

It is the place for old tradsters to go and relive their misspent youth while eating well and sleeping comfortably.

Chris
Chris Wegener

Trad climber
St. John, Virgin Islands
Sep 21, 2006 - 01:49pm PT
Here is the route on the Third Tower

The descent is also long, down the regular route across the huge ledge midway up and then several miserable rappels past chock stones down the gully on the right.

The sport climbing isn't bad either.

And the rewards of the refugios is not to be underestimated.

Chris
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 21, 2006 - 08:06pm PT
So Tarbuster, what's up with the matching backpacks? I mean, you guys sure do look suave with the coordinated threads, but was it a 4-for-1 deal or something? :)
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2006 - 08:38pm PT
Curlie,
I stayed up all night making those rucksacks before boarding the plane for Italia; I was once a bit handy with a needle and thread you see...

Yes Stich,
There are a few Via Ferrata guidebooks out there; ours may have been German or British...

'Still lookin' good Mr. Wegener, but where's the suede shoes?
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 21, 2006 - 11:09pm PT
Wow, impressive work! Is Missus Tarbousier sporting one of your creations in this photo as well?

Hey, Chris -- you got a picture of the Agip gas stations? That was one of my favorite parts of the trip.

Me: Hey, is it just me, or was that sign of a 6-legged dog breathing fire on his own ass?
(blank stares like I've just gone completely mad)
Me: No, really!

Sure enough, we finally got another look at one and it was a six-legged dog breathing fire onto its ass....those crazy Italians!
WBraun

climber
Sep 21, 2006 - 11:15pm PT
Hey Roy

How come we can't have ladders like that up El Cap?

Oh yeah, I know, everybody has to be a badass.

Are there any normal people left in the world?
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 21, 2006 - 11:44pm PT
Werner, don't forget a refugio at the top with beer, wine, coffee, food, and bunks! And the ski lift up/down the East Ledges, of course!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 22, 2006 - 12:06am PT
Normal Werner?
Wouldn't that be an aberration?

So Curlie,
The plot thickens here a wee bit.

I used to make portaledges 'n stuff with Mussy, plus all variety of keen stuff. Oh never mind the lead in...

When Randi went over the bars in a bike race and out the big door, I helped her parents sort through some stuff, er, all the stuff.
I even found letters I had written her long ago.

We had dated sure, but more importantly were close friends and neighbors for many years.

The pack which Lisa is wearing in the picture that you just linked was Randi's.
I wrote a little story, "The Water of Life" about Randi's passing and put in in one of my threads: http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=194810&f=35&b=0


curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Sep 22, 2006 - 01:46am PT
That's a beautiful story, Tar-b. Brought a bit of water to my eyes as well. The pictures are delightful -- she's incredibly photogenic, and it's obvious that she was having a great time in the Dolomiti.
Chris Wegener

Trad climber
St. John, Virgin Islands
Sep 22, 2006 - 08:36am PT
Per Curlie's request, here is the Agip Gas Station Logo

Did I mention the refuggios?

And of course, Curlie. This Buds for you.

Chris
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 22, 2006 - 11:37am PT
Yup,
Those Italos really know how teh live!

OK,
Via Ferrata Primer & Closer Part 3,
Descent from the Sella Group Unplanned Bivi:

It's cool to just trot around with a day pack and stop as needed;
ya might want a sleeping bag for most overnighters.
A rack and rope would get heavy, but steep rock is everywhere.

So we descended some more nifty cliffs and structures:

Has Anyone Seen the Bridge?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 22, 2006 - 11:45am PT

When you don't have cables teh clutch,
You got copious markers to follow through the mist:
Way down valley on that windy road I was hearing some nice sounds,
"Those are not rental car noises" I said to Randi...



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 22, 2006 - 11:52am PT



...A good place for a helmet, people all over the place.
We saw a 70 year young woman hoppin' about this Ferrata...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 22, 2006 - 12:08pm PT
When we got down,
We found ourselves in the midst of the
21e Coppa D'oro Della Dolomiti Trofeo Martini:



This concludes the Via Ferrata portion of my presentation.
Talk amongst yerselves, post up some Dolomiti pics,
Maybe go look at Misha's latest thread:
http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=257064&f=0&b=0

I'll be back with some moderate sporty craggin'...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2006 - 01:39pm PT

There is lots of Sport Climbing in the Doli's.
This is a sample of some stuff right outside Cortina,
"The Cinque Terra", a good first stop:

The hut is circled.



Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2006 - 01:47pm PT

As Captain of our Little Team of Four,
I Assumed the Role, Not So Much As Guide,
But as QC Manager & Safety Officer.

Here is The Poseur Postur Tarbousier,
In the Throws of Performing His Vigilant Duties:


Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2006 - 01:53pm PT

Randi on Her First Lead, Ever:


Tim on the Same Mission:

And Robin Pushin' Her Skills:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2006 - 01:58pm PT

Even I got to Find Sumthin' Teh Do,
Challenging and Upwards Like:

A View from the Refugio,
And the Crags Just Up the Hill:
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Sep 23, 2006 - 02:00pm PT
-Hi Chris, been ages. Looks like a great time with “Wild” Jim in Italy.
-I am inspired by this thread to put a couple of Via Ferrata on the life list. To Roy and the others who have done these , which is the best of them?
Rick
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2006 - 02:14pm PT
I have experienced only the three which appear in this thread Rick; the one on the left flank of the Tofana is handy because this is very near Cortina and the Cinque Terra. I don't recall the name, but the tunnel is a defining feature.

The other two are shown and named on the attendant postcards and were used to surmount, "bivi" and decend the Gruppo Sella and it had some airy sections. The "Meisules" and "Tridentina".

In both cases the Ferrata enabled a good view of "real" climbs as well.

As for the best examples of the Ferrata in all of the Doli's,
I can't comment, but I had heard or read there were some which were steeper and even 5th class. An old friend is in posession of the guide and he lives here in Boulder.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2006 - 11:57pm PT
Chris Wegener

Trad climber
St. John, Virgin Islands
Sep 24, 2006 - 10:20am PT
Hey Rick--

It is impossible to pick a bad via ferratta. The Dolomites have it all. There is great sport climbing short as well as multi-pitch. Fabulous long trad multi pitch climbs. Like the Pont Fiames pictured earlier it was put up in 1914 and with sticky rubber and modern gear we found it stout, even if it is 'only' 5.7.

The via Ferratta are everywhere. like Tarbuster says they range from moderate half day jaunts to long climbs with bivis required. The thing that is hard to understand about climbing there is how featured and steep the rock walls are. You get into amazing positions even on the fourth class via ferrattas. There are moderate (5.10) climbs on the overhanging walls of the Tre Cima. Everywhere you go there are one great climb after another.

The main thing to be aware of is how busy it gets in the summer. I have always gone in June to try and avoid the crowds. One year there was snow everywhere and we had trouble finding accessible climbs. The second time it was great. Some of the refugios weren't open yet and not all the hotels and restarants are open but there are sufficient accomodations if you plan ahead.

The main area is not that large. you can drive from Bolzano to the Tre Cima in four hours and that covers most of the area. Any valley can supply a vacations worth of climbing. I am particularly fond of Val Gardena and the Sella Pass area but there is climbing everywhere.

Another option is to hike from refugio to refugio. They provide food and lodging and you just need to carry your personal gear. Make sure you make reservations though.

English guides are easily avaliable form Chessler Books or Amazon.

Regards,
Chris
Paul

Trad climber
Muir Beach, CA
Sep 25, 2006 - 10:59am PT
While you are posting pictures of the Dolomites - get this - we ARE in the Dolomites climbing! Wooo-hooo! The climbing is fantastic, food is great, and the wine is very good to us. We only have 10 days here, but the past 3 have been excellent. More later!
Paul (Muir Beach)
Cortina for now
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2006 - 11:24am PT
Way to go!
It's a good bet for stable weather this time of year.
Have a great trip,
Thanks for checking in...

(Make some snappy pictures and post 'em when you get back?!)
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2006 - 04:04pm PT
This is a Lancia Aurelia in the vicinity of Sella Pass:
A young Austrian guide visited us a couple times here in Colorado;
He knew of some storied routes on that face in the background...
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 26, 2006 - 10:58am PT
Thought I was done, Finito, right?
Un-Unh, but Almost...

This is the Tre Cime from the side you approach,
You are looking at the Southeast or "Backsides", L-R:
Cima Occidentale, Cima Grande, Cima Piccola, Punta di Frida, & Piccolisima:

And circled is the Refugio Lavaredo,
With a good view L-R, of:
Cima Piccola, Punta Frida, Piccolissima.
We climbed the arete of the Cima Piccola, the Spigalo Gialo (sp) translated as the "Yellow Edge",
Requiring 12 topo'd pitches, 9 ropelengths for us.
(Rick's earlier photos featured a climb of the Piccolisima).

Here is the more Iconic Northwest side of these historic walls:
A climb on this side briefly related upthread by R Muir.
This is also the theater upon which Huber performed a magnificent solo.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 26, 2006 - 11:29am PT
Grazie!
I was both the leader and the team "seamstress".

I wipped up 4 packs the day and night prior to our departure for Italy,
Each with a different color back panel for quick ID.

My concept was two fold: to make a nice gift to my friends,
As well to insure we all had a proper rucksack appropriately fit to the required loads.
Les

Trad climber
Brooklyn
Sep 26, 2006 - 02:03pm PT
Every now and then, the real potential of an online climbing forum is realized, as this thread so vividly demonstrates. In spades.

Bravo! Grazie!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 26, 2006 - 11:52pm PT
Thank You Les,
Er I Mean, Grazie!
Buono Fortuna!

This is the Yellow Edge of the Cima Piccola,
A nice, say 400+ meter route, crux up high...
And the Refugio Locatelli, where we stayed the night before.
WBraun

climber
Sep 27, 2006 - 12:01am PT
The Cima Piccola diretissima, ve drop a drop of water and there we go?

Very good Roy, 400 meters plus with crux at the end where one will be tired?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2006 - 12:01am PT
Well, I don't have a topo to the route,
But here is a map written, er, printed on a napkin:
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2006 - 12:15am PT
Perhaps Dr Verner Braun,
Yes one might be tired if one were to follow such a drop's path.
(But that would put you on the wicked pumper sport route)
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2006 - 12:33am PT
Whereas we chose the classic line,
Which wanders to the right in the mid section,
But back to the edge where the hard bit hangs.

The rock is superb and kinda lumpy and golden,
With forgiving features, such as this crack-like crux:

How does one route find on such a structure?
Mostly you just follow mangled soft iron pitons...

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2006 - 10:23am PT
Randi,
Cool & Relaxed High on the Route,
On a Narrow Ledge Out on the Arete:
The Upper Portion of the Arete,
With a Climber in the Upper Crack System,
From Paulcke & Dumler's "Hazards in Mountaineering.
sketchy

Trad climber
Vagrant
Sep 27, 2006 - 01:07pm PT
Great thread tarbuster, I have definatly added Italy to my list. Thanks for taking the time.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2006 - 11:00am PT
Reaching For The Summit:

A view from the top, a snappy descent, a toast to the most!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2006 - 05:22pm PT
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2006 - 10:06pm PT

Finito!
Thanks Randi!

(The End)
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Oct 7, 2006 - 03:59am PT
First of all, a giant THANK YOU to Bonnie Kamps, who sent me another disc. Subsequent pix are either hers or Jim Wilson's. Here's a shot that Chris already posted, of the inimitable Ms. Kamps on a via ferrata:

The first stop was Bolzano. We wandered around the city for a little while and stumbled across a farmer's market:

Then we, of course, found the climbing store. They had the biggest pack I had ever seen in my life. Here's my impression of the kind of person it would take to carry a pack like that:

They also had these cool wood carvings of Italian mountaineers. I don't remember who they were carvings of, but they were life-sized and really cool:



Our first climb was a 4-pitch route up one of the Cinque Torri. The Cinque Torri (5 Towers):

Me and Chris marveling to be in such a fabulous place:

It only had 2 5.6 moves, so we drug my Mom along (she's the redhead):

Coaching Mom through the first 5.6 move:

Who is that swole dude? Check out the swole chicks coming up to meet him at the belay!

Mom rappelling off. This was the rappel after the first rappel, which was quite exciting. It was the first time Mom had to actually rappel over an edge. She forgot to move her feet and ended up upside-down. I thought it was kinda funny, but she was a bit concerned about the whole situation....anyway, she fared much better on this one:

We stayed to do a couple of sport routes, while Mom and Bonnie headed back down to the car. Unfortunately, the ski lift had already closed:

Some cool pictures of peaks & mountains. They're all from somewhere in the general Cortina vicinity, though I don't remember the specifics of each one anymore:



The backyard of the lovely Hotel Menardi, where we stayed in Cortina:

The front of the Hotel Menardi -- Wherefore art thou, Romeo?

Another shot of the cool Punta Fiames arete:

While Mom was freaking out 'cause we were late, we were just happy to be headed down at last:

Ah, note that this picture was taken in nighttime mode.....still on the descent down from Punta Fiames, down the biggest scree slope I've ever hiked down in my life. I had at least 5 categories of scree identified by the bottom, categorized from best to worst...

We took a break and went sport climbing for a day after that. Here are shots of the local vegetation on the way to the crag. And at the crag, the names of the climbs and grades were painted at the base of each route.


Lush forests are cool, I haven't seen many:

Here is the local fauna at another sport crag, near the Sella group:

More fauna:

More from the Tre Cime area. The wonderful Rifugio Lavaredo:

Whoa, they like, have Jesus at the top of the mountains in Italy (top of Il Patroni):

A better picture of the memorials on the way to Lavaredo:

An even better one:

And an even better better one:

Another shot of bouldering on the perfect boulder:

These were some shenanigans after I left. You just can't keep a good climber down!


The End. Note the Classic Dolomites Climbs book in hand.
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Oct 7, 2006 - 04:06am PT
And where is Paul from Muir Beach (who posted that he was actually in the Dolomites while this thread was created!) and his pix? Don't be shy now! Heck, I just posted a picture of me imitating a goat!
Old Gnar

Trad climber
The Holler
Oct 7, 2006 - 08:56am PT
Wonderful photographs. Thank you. I just spent time in the Dolomites in September and hope that Brian will post some pictures. Fancy running into an old rec.climber from Salt Lake City at the Cinque Torres of all places...the flask of red at the hut was especially enjoyable.

Inez
PS--Me driving in Italy, sharing the road with 80,000 motorcyles returning from a meet in Austria was especially exciting!
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Oct 7, 2006 - 06:02pm PT
Curlie-beautiful photos on what looks like a great trip.

Tarbuster- Upthread, you had shots of the Spigolo Giallo (Yellow Edge) at the Tre Cima. Here’s a shot by Graham (the artist formerly known as Gramicci). Mike teamed up with this guy to climb the same route back in ‘76. Mike, help me out here, but as I recall it, you and I had left Chamonix separately and agreed to meet up at the Tre Cima later. You got to the Tre Cima a couple days before me and you did the Yellow Edge with this guy. I recall you saying it was somewhere in the 5.8 range? How did you find it, Roy?

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 7, 2006 - 08:46pm PT
Nice additions Curlie!
(I'll follow my promise to wup up some Needles stuff).

Ricky:
I really like that picture; that guy epitomizes glee & footwork in the mountains!

The Yelow Edge is a wonderful moderate tour.
Aside from the crux, which we translated and confirmed to be 5.9ish, the route consists of a long sustained 5.7/8 start in a cleft, followed by lots of 5.6 & 5.7.
curlie

Trad climber
SLO, CA
Oct 8, 2006 - 12:40am PT
Thanks, the real kudos go to Jim & Bonnie who took those great pix.

Those are some nice Yellow Edge pix, Tar & Rick. That's definitely on my list for next time. We only stayed at Lavaredo for one night, I could easily spend a week there. At least!

Yeah, for some reason I was initially hesitant about doing a climbing trip in a foreign country. I couldn't say exactly why, maybe felt it would be too much of a hassle traveling with gear, or something lame like that. But now I'm totally sold, it was one of the best experiences. Can't wait to go more places!
Zander

Trad climber
Berkeley
Oct 8, 2006 - 07:19pm PT
Tarbuster and Curlie, And all.
Thanks for this great thread. I hope it keeps rolling. Unfortunately, I have never been so someone else will have to do it.
Zander
maldaly

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Feb 3, 2007 - 12:17pm PT
If you're still not sure if you want to go:
A panorama from the deck of the Refugio di Lavaredo. Behind me, a 20 minute walk away is the Tre Cima gruppo.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
May 28, 2009 - 11:44pm PT
Bump for the ultimate European thread ever on ST-Town
Michael D

Big Wall climber
Napoli, Italy
May 29, 2009 - 01:20am PT
...and a cool place to kickback after Tre Cime routes, Misurina.

DanaB

climber
Philadelphia
May 29, 2009 - 11:50am PT
The Dolomites is a fantastic place. What I remember most is that we climbed in the Tre Cime, the Marmolada, and a few other areas, we did at least 100 pitches and we placed, at most, 3 to 4 pieces of gear. The rock is so compact and the few available slots were filled with old pitons.
divad

Trad climber
wmass
Jul 23, 2009 - 03:00pm PT
Bumping this fine thread for all the great pix. One of the places on this earth that I could never get enough of in one lifetime.

The Tofana Group

Punta Fiames

Taken on 9/11/01 and being oblivious to what was happening elsewhere
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jul 23, 2009 - 05:28pm PT
Classic stuff.

To think I moved out west when I had a chance to
go to the Dolis. . . .

nah, I dun good here too!
Nohea

Trad climber
Sunny Aiea,Hi
Aug 26, 2009 - 06:34am PT
Is this not one of the top 10 threads at the campfire? Thanks to all you have contributed.

Aloha,
wil
Ray-J

Social climber
east L.A. vato...
Aug 26, 2009 - 09:35pm PT
1). Start a fund raiser to get Tarbuster owunna them little red sports cars.
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Aug 27, 2009 - 05:38am PT
Wow - superb! Missed it the first AND the second time round, as I was on El Cap. Made it this time, though.

Aloha, eh?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 17, 2019 - 08:22am PT

Sad to see the change on Tarbuster's thread...
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Apr 17, 2019 - 09:09am PT

But we can post photos that we own?

Up at Kronplatz Bell, is the Messner Museum. For lovers of old climbing gear, I don't believe it comes much older.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 17, 2019 - 10:33am PT
Marlow wrote:
Sad to see the change on Tarbuster's thread...

This is but a taste of the wholesale butchery the "moderators" of this dying forum have enacted.

ANY thread produced prior to 2009/10 when these guys instituted their own photo hosting functionality, will look just like this one.
No photos whatsoever unless you slavishly click through the links.

I produced over 100 richly infused climbing threads with primarily my own photographs hosted from photobucket (6000+ photos), and most all of them will be just as deserted as this one.
There are MANY fine contributors to this forum whose work now looks much the same.

John, Fritz:
Thanks for your additions, but are you sure you want to dignify this obtuse and ridiculous move by the owners of this website by contributing anything at this point?
Fritz

Social climber
Choss Creek, ID
Apr 17, 2019 - 11:08am PT
Tar: My condolences. I was attempting to share what happened to your wonderful thread.

Lo siento.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 17, 2019 - 11:47am PT
Ha ha, Fritz!
If they ever make this forum whole again, we should start thinking about contributing to it once more!
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Apr 17, 2019 - 12:40pm PT

That bad eh? Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?

The internet overall is the most toxic it has ever been. Obviously the Taco is under some sort of stress though I haven't poked about on it. These guys have been running it since the beginning. Have to trust their judgement.

Meanwhile I really recommend the Dolomites as a vacation stop.
Robb

Social climber
Cat Box
Apr 17, 2019 - 01:28pm PT
Difficult stuff indeed, yea in some cases almost heart breaking to no longer be able to see what was in some ways arguably the history of our lives.....Roy, next time you're down FoCo way, let's go have a beer.
Robb
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