50s + Thread - The Art of Aging Gracefully (or not)

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Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 12, 2014 - 04:09pm PT
For some, turning 50 is a tea break on the flowering path of security and success. All the little piggy’s lined up; happy grown family, mortgages paid, increased time to climb and play. . . Ref: Chapter 12, A Guide to The American Dream. I got stuck on chapter 11 and at 51 a self made antithesis of that dream, juggling the teetering catastrophe is taking on a new element . . . . physical ability.

Enjoyed decades of moderate 11's and A3 climbing without really bleeding for it, but since passing 45 those ratings have dropped about 2 grades per year. These days French freeing steep sidewalks is totally on.

Hope to end all that on a good note, slide in a few more walls and bucket list routes before I take up extreme lounging. Recently committed to a Paleo diet to rid the pig wings, begrudgingly cut out libations and started a regular workout routine. Already feeling a boost in energy and stoke, but still regarding wall climbing, having a hard time shaking concerns of blown out muscles and tendons, recovery time etc.

Probably sounds more like torn sack which I can accept, regardless, still interested in experiences and perspectives from climbers in their finer years whether pulling down hard, just recreating or having donated the rack.

What are you doing to stay in the game, how’s your drive to push it, how is (was) it hanging up the gear for good?
Abe
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Mar 12, 2014 - 04:20pm PT
Mostly cruise control for me, mate. I'm up and down, in health, in the world, in climbing. On the upswing right now - recovering well from spinal chord surgery and lots of tumultuous uproar in life, spring is in the air here in the central valley, poppies blooming, orchards going off, honey bees by the billions - its NICE!

Feeling the same old desire to climb. I love her still. Sometimes she's a stern demandtrix, doling out punishment for over reaching. Other times she's a sweet lover caressing my brow and rewarding my exertions with a warm glow.

I'm sure I'll trip over something soon and hurt myself again though :) My left ankle has some numbness that affects my balance. Almost pitched head first off a cliff 2 or 3 weeks ago; tripped while setting a TR. I'm a danger to myself and others!!!!11111 :D

But know what?

Spring is in the air, trusty rusty and so is climbing. And so long as I'm fit, I'll be pining for it. Ratings are only important to me in that I can intelligently pick an objective. The rate itself, while such games still tickle my ego from time to time? Its more about - measuring myself against my own past performance, a thermometer of my own making. Can I push the mercury up the tube one more time?

Yes I can America!

DMT
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Mar 12, 2014 - 04:30pm PT
I hear you TR!

Climbing stayed reasonably easy until I got close to 50. (48?) At 53 I still have two in the roost and a lot to do at home.

The bad news is that I have to look at moderate 10's with a whole new set of eyes.

The good news is that the easier stuff got interesting again!

Still plugging away, not interested in quitting.....
mikegrai

climber
ON
Mar 12, 2014 - 04:43pm PT
Since I didn't start climbing until my late 40's, I have the advantage of being a never-was instead of a has-been. At 60, I'm climbing the hardest I ever have, but that isn't saying much - leading 5.9 trad and 5.10 sport. All those boring but effective strategies - healthy diet, rest, exercise - play a role in hiding your true age from your body. I'm just grateful each time my body is still able to chew what my mind has bitten off. The more cool places in the world I go climbing the more places I want to get to. I know one of these times it will all come to an end, either with a bang or a whimper, but for now I'm enjoying the ride.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Mar 12, 2014 - 04:53pm PT
Hey Trusty one..!

Myself- mid 50s, my desire isnt there as it once was- financial and medical issues take their toll. Sometimes the presures of life must take a front seat. That being said, i still enjoy getting out and care not one bit about "numbers" anymore. In fact, those many easier "noob" routes now take on an appeal they never had before, so there is still plenty of new ground to go forth and enjoy. Peaks and mountaineering as well. Rock air and rope is still the same, just on a different level. Nowadays im the king o 5.3D..! We earned our stripes long ago, and nothing left to prove but having fun..

survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Mar 12, 2014 - 05:00pm PT
I've got one word for you D-O-N-I-N-I....
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Mar 12, 2014 - 05:01pm PT
I know one climber who peaked climbing 7c/5.12.d at the age of 65. When I climbed with him a couple of years ago he was 73 and still able to lead routes graded 6c/5.11.c on vertical wall even though he hadn't climbed much the last few years. The only place you could see the age was during steep O2 demanding walks to get to the cliffs.

There's hope... :o)
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2014 - 05:35pm PT
Appreciate the input, all great stuff.
Regarding rating -vs- enjoyment, totally not a personal issue as well, just that walls have clear figures of admission.
Marlow, WTF. . .that dude's a Crimp Mac Daddy.
Abe
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Mar 12, 2014 - 05:42pm PT
I'm not sure what it really means to age gracefully I suppose I mean to go not too gentle into that good night, you know, rage, rage against the dying of the light. I got pretty competent climbing in my 20s and 30s and then increasing responsibility, kids, family: the climbing and adventure seemed to drift away. Then started at the gym in my forties and to my surprise got in the best climbing shape of my life. But here I am just about to turn 66 wishing I was a hell of a lot younger, thinking I'd like to cut out to the Valley this week and see if I have anything left at all. Really missing the place... whew, too much self pity got to get back to work.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 12, 2014 - 06:14pm PT
57c and in the best overall shape of my life. 5'10" 154lbs. Very active, climbing a lot, and running at least one half marathon length trail run a month since december of 2011. Haven't eaten mammal flesh since 1982, haven't done booze since 2010. I think that's all part of it. I've also been incredibly fortunate health wise.

Climbed 5.11+ ow on Sunday, yesterday I did a fifteen mile trail run and lifted weights. Today is a rest day. I feel better when I'm active. I feel rundown if I sit too long.

I'm in a fairly unique position as far as having freedom and locale in which to be this active. I don't know if I'm as good an all-round climber as I've been, but as far as the offwidth climbing I've been specializing in, I'm climbing about as well as ever.

A few years ago I was heavier, less active, though pretty achieve by normal standards, and had various aches and pains all the time.

Don't stand still.(?)
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 12, 2014 - 06:22pm PT
Satchel Paige once said "don't look back, 'cause something might be gainin' on ya'."

I feel the ravages of father time at age 75, but I still have the desire to get out and "do stuff." Granted, I don't lead (much) anymore, but I can still haul my carcass up some longer climbs (8-10 leads) at a 5.6-5.8 difficulty. It still pleases me to do so...
okie

Trad climber
Mar 12, 2014 - 07:13pm PT
+1 Jaybro!
I'm turning 50 on the upcoming green drinking holiday. Actually kinda psyched about it which is good cause not much choice in the matter.
Don't make the mistake of thinking you have time or that it is on your side. 50's = decide what's important and get after it.
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Mar 12, 2014 - 07:56pm PT
At fifty you are still young. Adjust your attitude and get out there and perform.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:04pm PT
^^^^^^. +++++++++++++a bazillion
50s= faux geezerville


Susan
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:06pm PT
Right you are John.....we are both old enough to have children fifty years old. I'm at DIA with a four hour layover on my way back from Patagonia....convoluted trip from hell, definetly feel my age right now.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Lassitude 33
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:07pm PT
A big part of climbing when older is motivation.

If you go at it (assuming generally good health), you can still climb pretty hard. But, it takes much longer to get in shape (you have to work at it slowly and carefully and more) and you get out of shape much faster (take time off from activity and you lose it quickly).

Also, you are working off of the foundation you laid in years past (were you active or sedentary, took care of yourself or abused), genetics, and luck.

scuffy b

climber
heading slowly NNW
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:11pm PT
Point taken, but I'll say that I see plenty of 50-yr olds who are OLD.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:14pm PT
Lee Scheftel climbed his first 13s in his 50s, and his first 5.14a at 59.

Bill Ramsey is cranking in his 50s, sent 14b at like 52.

Chuck Claude is climbing 13 on gear in his 50s.

Limits are mostly in your mind. Eat well, rest and recover properly, gradually add volume, take regular back off periods, and stay active.

Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 12, 2014 - 08:17pm PT
No foreplay or lube there John, fully agree though, attitude of Do.
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:18pm PT
I don't intend to go out in a Nursing Home, drooling on my cardigan with a tube up my wazoo!

I'd much rather vapor-lock on a hard climb in the Dolomites.

Difficulty is only relative to expectations, and this year I've raised my personal bar quite a bit.

The only joker in the deck is injuries; after a while they take longer to heal and recovery time can be...annoying! Just don't get hurt being stupid.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:22pm PT
I've raised my personal bar quite a bit

Is that the limbo bar, Rodger?

Rock in' Rodger! Love ya, man!

Susan
Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Mar 12, 2014 - 09:41pm PT
56 years of age.

Since age 50 I have collected one Transient Ischemic Attack, two bouts of Skin Cancer, three degenerated discs and just today found out I have cataracts from "too many years outside".

I'm starting to think the only thing "golden" about the "Golden Years" is the color of your pee. Even then, only if you take a lot of B Vitamins!


tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
Mar 12, 2014 - 09:44pm PT
Almost 52 now.. Led half of this crazy 5 @ the Lake yesterday.. feeling prety good:) My partner was a young pup and wanted to do annother climb to cap the day off. I was satisfyed with the one climb and passed on more excitement for the day.
Nice alpine feel.
Nice alpine feel.
Credit: tradmanclimbs
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Mar 12, 2014 - 10:14pm PT
I've done some roped climbing every year since I was 20, and it was a huge part of my life in my 20's, although the hardest route I’ve ever led was only 5.10D.

I kept rock-climbing at a reduced pace in my 30’s & 40’s, but gave up ice and big mountains.

Ripped a bicep during a slightly desperate lunge at age 50, which I felt for a long time, but I kept doing some easy leads every year. After 50, most people can count on some kind of health problem every year or so. Mine have mostly been Achilles tendonitis,and Basel Cell skin cancers, with an occasional bout of bad back for variety.

My old friend Donini (the bastard) dragged me back into easy for him, hard for me climbing in 2010, but I find myself at age 64, enjoying 5.4-5.9 and the social fun of climbing.

My only advice is: stay positive and hang with positive people!
MikeL

Trad climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Mar 12, 2014 - 10:43pm PT
There's little doubt that body and health are the most important things in this life, but outside of this life, it appears to be pretty amazing, too. At least it is for me. Every event or procedure that takes a bit of my physical capability or vigor from me (even if temporarily) exposes something else wonderful. It's all good.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Mar 12, 2014 - 11:05pm PT
Fritz and Brokendown...follow your bliss....rj
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Mar 12, 2014 - 11:17pm PT
I'll be turning 53 in July, which will also be my four year sobriety date. Since quitting the sauce I have lost 50+ pounds, rediscovered my passion for climbing, put up around 30 FAs, and am feeling healthier than I did 10 years ago.

Recently moving to Boulder was a 35 year goal that finally leaves me surrounded by new rock, new routes, and constant motivation. I feel blessed every time I go out, whether I am doing a long cruiser or a heinous number pusher. Both kids are out of college and my daughter lives only an hour away in Denver and is a willing and able partner. My wife is supportive of my active and healthy passions, and being self-employed gives me flexibility to climb when I want. As a result I don't feel or act my age, I don't see any benefit to it.

I accept that I will be presented with new limitations year by year, but hope to fight those challenges with grace, style, and a positive outlook.


"Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many."
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 12, 2014 - 11:25pm PT
"Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many."

Wow. Does that say it all. That is now engraved on my heart and mind!
Thank you!

Susan
jstan

climber
Mar 12, 2014 - 11:56pm PT
Only one thing is important at any age. Do you find what you are doing, exciting?

Today at the Clean Team four new volunteers, just showed up. Plus three more who joined two weeks ago. Yesterday I got a call wanting help with setting up an event in a new area. Last Saturday I helped a group working with kids. There were 60 kids there. Kind of embarrassing thing happened though. One youngster saluted me. Must have been my CalTrans sunglasses. What we had was a failure to communicate.

Beginning to think I need to get a go-Pro video camera and put together an audio visual presentation. For schools and other groups. Way way outside of my skill set.

I'd have to learn.

Got a cell phone today. Probably get titanium bones next.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:01am PT
^^^ Did you try the new skin tight underwear boxers?

DMT
jstan

climber
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:04am PT
Yes, but they gave me a god awful headache.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Canada
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:12am PT
Enjoy your life. If a bicycle or a pair of skis efficiently takes up the slack for the time vortex that is rock climbing, be happy about it. You are still taking risks, breathing air in the forest and psyched about something good.

How long can anything last ? One thing ends and another begins. Largo wrote the best ever article once. Something about being a champion and then after, being graceful about it once the moment's over.

clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:19am PT
Now I really feel young.

Old dudes rock.

Edge, less weight= smaller casket= conservation. I'm having the same revitalizing experience finding unclimbed rock and putting up routes.

Life is an adventure.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:27am PT
Do you find what you are doing, exciting?

Oh no...another engraving on my heart and mind!!!! I hope I have a large enough heart and enough mindfulness to capture all these.
As for climbing and physicality....tomorrow off to climb in JTree. At 64 I'm never sure exactly what I will be up for until I get to the base of a climb....but as part of a hard core geezer squad we never give up...some are still climbing walls, hauling pigs and porta ledges, some like me, climb anything that gives me the thrill-of-a-lifetime rappel...or multi pitch that allow me to walk off and still walk the next day.
I'm not sure what the balance of aging gracefully (or not) is for you, but you will find it. For me, in terms of "aging" I found my early to mid 50s to be like a young teenager again....finding and exploring and learning and accepting what your next stage of life will be all about. It wasn't always easy to navigate and accept many of the changes, but denying them stalled me. If you stay active I think you'll be surprised at how physically strong you can be.
It's pretty special to discover yourself all over again...surprise yourself!

Susan
overwatch

climber
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:44am PT
That was a good one, Edge
MH2

climber
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:56am PT
Everyone's a little different, Trusty Rusty, except for the ones who are a lot different. Just never forget what is most important: making people laugh.

One youngster saluted me. Must have been my CalTrans sunglasses.

jstan
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 13, 2014 - 01:20am PT
Climbing as an activity is not really important to me anymore. I love to climb when I get the chance, but I don't invest a lot of effort in the pursuit. I still like to hang out with climbers and meet new friends in the community because we do have a special and unique community of individuals here. There is nothing quite like it.

Lynne L. has talked about it; not quite realizing the depth and strength of how we reach out to grab that hand and provide a lift in those dark moments. The discovery of belonging to a family you might not of known you have, that really cares. It IS about light.
moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 13, 2014 - 01:28am PT
Aging gracefully.

Credit: moosedrool
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA/Boulder, CO
Mar 13, 2014 - 01:55am PT
If you are having fun who cares at what grade you are climbing? Isn't all about having fun anyway?
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2014 - 02:39am PT
What a wealth of good natured insight. Again, I hope not to emphasize grades or ratings, clearly not an issue in the grand scheme. Now fun on the other-hand. . .absolutely an issue.
Some of my favorite aspects of aging are a heightened sense of authenticity and a cooler perspective. Though in my youth the inheritance of intangibles meant next to nothing, today it's a whole new paradigm and I'm hauling in all I can, paradoxically hauling in whats been mine all along. I guess it's like taking back the neighborhood lawns for comfort stops, flexing pedigree right to the fullest extent. That said, dark glasses, hats and good running shoes are good precaution.
bhilden

Trad climber
Mountain View, CA/Boulder, CO
Mar 13, 2014 - 03:07am PT
Don't worry about what people think about you(that means getting off of Facebook immediately) is very liberating.
BruceAnderson

Social climber
Los Angeles currently St. Antonin, France
Mar 13, 2014 - 03:46am PT
My wife turned 50 this year and is climbing better than ever. Did her first 5.12 this year and so far has done about 4 more. Keeps me (a juvenile 44) on my toes.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Mar 13, 2014 - 07:55am PT
jstan...I'd like to see those skin tight boxers when you get the go pro up and running...rj
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Mar 13, 2014 - 08:27am PT
Going on 68, and I still love climbing, but my body is not cooperating much.

Seems the old joints are seizing up like a rusty bolt.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:19am PT
I'm going on 57...

...years of climbing that is, I'm 70.

It took me a long time to get good, and a long time to get bad, but good and bad and mostly somewhere between, damn if it hasn't been fun the whole way.

The mind perpetually thinks it is in charge of a 25 year-old body, and has to be continually re-trained to deal with the fact that it isn't driving a formula-one any more. (It never was driving a formula-one of course, but allow it a few illusions). Now the master of a sputtering old junker, it never ceases to be surprised when it stomps on the gas and nothing much happens.

"Captain, the forearms are reporting a precipitous drop in hydraulic pressure!"

"WTF? We haven't even reached the crux yet. Full speed ahead you moron!"

"Sorry sir, we've already red-lined the main drive."

"Well switch on the auxilliary power you idiot!"

"Uh, sir, there is no auxilliary power. We burned that unit out years ago."

"Oh, right. Ok, activate the rest radar. Gotta find a way to shake out."

"Uh sir......."

The ACL in one knee's been replaced by a cadaver tendon. (Meniscus dissection as well.) Something is very wrong about this---I'll be dead soon enough as it is, so do we really have to get a jump on it by swapping out for parts from the crypt? Apparently, recovery is faster this way, but I end up with a Zombknee and it has taken two years before I've been able to start jumping rope again. (It's the lost meniscus, not the new ACL, that is slowing things down.)

Anyway, a lot of climbing is about dealing with What Is. That was the fun of it, and it still is the fun of it. The "What Is" changes, but the dealing is pretty much the same.

The arc of life and all that, eh?
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:25am PT
The ACL in one knee's been replaced by a cadaver tendon. (Meniscus dissection as well.) Something is very wrong about this---I'll be dead soon enough as it is, so do we really have to get a jump on it by swapping out for parts from the crypt?

Those, right there, are some of the best sentences, EVAH!

:-)

donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:31am PT
Rgold may be aging but his words remain among the most graceful to appear on this forum.
jopay

climber
so.il
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:39am PT
67 here, still enjoy the ice.
Fun, enjoying the latest generation of ice tool technology, which will...
Fun, enjoying the latest generation of ice tool technology, which will dent your wallet but is certainly a game changer.
Credit: jopay
Blakey

Trad climber
Sierra Vista
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:57am PT
Well,

I've recently turned 58 and have the good fortune to be climbing as well as I ever have. On our summer trip to the US; Valley, Tuolumne, Lovers Leap etc, I 'lost' 3kg and am now an even slimmer 69kg - (It's made a big dfference to my knees and my ability to crank).

To stay in shape.....Mondays I cycle and climb, Tuesdays do a stack of pull ups on Rock Rings and Beastmaker, Wednesdays maybe a game of Squash. Thursday boulder for a couple of hours, Friday rest, Saturday out climbing, and then every other Sunday climbing. (Jeez,I didn't realise I did so much.....)

After 47 years I'm still motivated - because it's fun innit!

And I have a 14 year old pup to try and keep ahead of - not for much longer I suspect, but then I'll have a captive rope gun!

Regards,

Steve

Edit...... Just read Gold's Gold. As ever and like lots of others I love reading his stuff - wisdom.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Mar 13, 2014 - 10:10am PT
"Captain, the forearms are reporting a precipitous drop in hydraulic pressure!"

"WTF? We haven't even reached the crux yet. Full speed ahead you moron!"

"Sorry sir, we've already red-lined the main drive."

"Well switch on the auxilliary power you idiot!"

"Uh, sir, there is no auxilliary power. We burned that unit out years ago."

"Oh, right. Ok, activate the rest radar. Gotta find a way to shake out."

"Uh sir......."

Laughing with rgold is good enough for my next post, BWA HA HA hahahaaaa!
That is EXACTLY how I feel sometimes!
TWP

Trad climber
Mancos, CO
Mar 13, 2014 - 10:30am PT
"Aging gracefully" sounds like an oxymoron to me.

"Raging against decay"

OR

"Daily denial while nearing death's door"

Are more like it here.

I am told regularly by "loved ones" to "let it go" and I say "No way." I'd rather die than go easily to a prison of mandatory idleness.

So, at age 60 I made a solemn vow to practice hatha yoga (hopefully daily and intensely) for the rest of my life. Already got the spiritual practice of daily meditation down and do transcendental meditation twice daily (since 1969 in fact).

Quit alcohol seven years ago.

Watch the diet (but make too many excuses to have brownies and pie, etc.)

The weak point of my fitness is cardiovascular though my resting heart rate is good, about 48 -52 beats/minute.

Have plans for intense activity into the foreseeable future. Ski my butt off during the winter, then rock climbing trips to Red Rocks, City of Rocks, Yosemite, llama pack in the Winds for six weeks, then off to Nepal for several months of tea house trekking. Then start over again with same/similar schedule for 2015.

My production may wain but I will continue to play the game and give myself chances to test my limits (eroding though inevitably they will).

As to the objective assessment of my climbing ability, I am a "has been that never was" - which provides its own freedom to keep going without any fear that I am "no longer" what I once was. I've never been "anyone" in the climbing world, so my identity is secure at the "incompetent and always have been" level.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Mar 13, 2014 - 10:44am PT
Rgold may be aging but his words remain among the most graceful to appear on this forum.

His climbing is that way too.

DMT
mooser

Trad climber
seattle
Mar 13, 2014 - 11:48am PT
I've been 50 for six years now, and I definitely appreciate that it's more of a challenge to get into fighting shape, and stay there. I feel like I'm doing okay, though, and while this may sound trite--it really does matter what your priorities are. The adage that "As long as you're having fun, that's all that matters" is, for some, a way of rationalizing away disappointment in one's inability to spring back as quickly as before. However, there can be, for others, real integrity in that statement, too. It depends on what you are looking for in climbing. My hardest redpoint to date was 12.c, and it was a proud moment. It was also 15 years ago. At the time, my focus was more on climbing the letter grades, and being able to track my progress against my training regimen, etc. Now, it's more of a combination of trying to keep an edge (which, granted, is a little duller than it was 15 years ago), and really maximizing my experience at the crags. I find myself wanting to be more fully "present" when I'm traveling, camping, sitting around the fire, and on the routes themselves. It seems like the older I get, the more conscious I am of how quickly time flies, and I don't want to look back at all these great moments climbing with great people, and wish I'd paid more attention to it--and to them--while I was doing it.
ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:02pm PT
The saying "it ain't the years, it's the mileage" comes to mind, problem is, there is good mileage (like Donini's) and then there is bad mileage (too many years hanging out with my musician "friends"). I need to start concentrating on the good, just turned 60 on Monday.

But, I must be on the right track cuz I got the same shoes as Moosedrool:-)
MikeL

Trad climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Mar 13, 2014 - 12:11pm PT
Rgold, that was a pretty funny post.
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 13, 2014 - 01:37pm PT
Some of the things others have suggested here may not make a person live longer or age "gracefully," such as giving up alcohol, making major changes to diet, etc., but it sure will make life seem a lot longer! ;)

I'm a big dietary supplement freak, and have been since ~1990. I don't avoid alcohol, but don't generally overindulge. I eat a very "normal" diet with meat. carbs, lots of green veggies, but generally avoid desserts except for homemade pies or such. Weight control is always at the forefront of my mind by so doing... Daily exercise by walking at least a mile a day weather permitting, and health club sessions thrown in for training before climbing season.
tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
Mar 13, 2014 - 01:46pm PT
just plowed snow for 2hrs and now must shovel the woodshed roof and I have some kind of nasty stomach bug. Do Not feel as though i am ageing gracefully at the moment.
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Mar 13, 2014 - 02:05pm PT
Turned 57 today.

Am essentially a slob. Winter of sloth. Watching Breaking Bad, eating celebratory foods (bacon! butter... ). Drinking usually 2 glasses of wine with dinner/ no more.

No climbing this winter, little hiking. Some road biking...was mtn biking a lot gonna ramp up again..

Keep this thread alive. Old guys need motivation.

Credit: Sewellymon
Above is my cousin Tom Smith's old gravel grinder. It's beat to sh*t-
needs a new drive train plus I need granny gears.
Also need better brakes and a gravity dropper so I can lower center of gravity on technical....
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 13, 2014 - 02:15pm PT
The grace part of it is my strong suit, these days. . . cause holdin' on to the strength part seems to be a thing of the past. If I even think about a real rest day, it'll take me three days of serious working out to recover.

What'sUpWithThat?

I didn't know this til I was 24, but my dad came clean one night, telling me that he was the reason I studied dance for 20 years. In an attempt to ensure that my size wouldn't confound me one day, he fought with my mom, tooth and nail, to pound down the fundage for me to study dance. Somehow, this big, strong USAF fighter pilot knew that the best thing he could give his big, strong TomBoy daughter was the gift of grace.

It paid off, but at 64, I'd be lyin' if I didn't admit that I would love for that BIG, STRONG part to stick around a little easier!
Urmas

Social climber
Sierra Eastside
Mar 13, 2014 - 02:41pm PT
Kathy, I don't know if your dance training had anything to do with it, but you EXUDE grace. It seems to come out of your pores! I don't think physical fitness has anything to do with it!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Mar 13, 2014 - 02:48pm PT

You, the Living
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2014 - 03:03pm PT

"Don't worry about avoiding temptation... as you grow older, it will avoid you." Winston Churchill

"Youth would be an ideal state if it came a little later in life."
Herbert Henry Asquith
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2014 - 03:07pm PT
And especially. . .Happy Birthday Sewellymon!
pud

climber
Sportbikeville & Yucca brevifolia
Mar 13, 2014 - 03:20pm PT
If one song could put living in my 50's in perspective, it's Black Sabbath's "Never say die"

George Burns once said "You're only as young as the girls you feel"
So I married a younger woman...

Staying in shape is way easier than getting back in it. I've been very fortunate in the genes dept. And enjoy hard exercise with no problems. I keep my expectaions realistic. As long as I'm having fun, numbers, speed, laptimes and competition have little meaning.

It's challenging at times but aging has many wonderfull things to offer.
Attitude is everything.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Mar 13, 2014 - 03:20pm PT
This thread's got legs....rebuilt, titanium ones. ;-)
(Still a handful of precious years in my 40s still.)
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Mar 13, 2014 - 04:42pm PT
Yes, this thread has legs, as there will be no shortage of geriatric climbers, to keep it alive.
The number of "older" climbers will increase dramatically pretty soon.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Mar 13, 2014 - 05:22pm PT
At George Burns 90th birthday party, he overheard someone say "Who'd want to live to be 90 anyway?"

He turned to them and said "Everyone who's 89."


My own Daddy used to say, "Every day on this side of the dirt is a good one!"
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Mar 13, 2014 - 05:39pm PT
you guys rock
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 13, 2014 - 06:13pm PT
Rgold=platinum
You rock man, even the repurposed parts.

Susan
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Mar 13, 2014 - 06:42pm PT
61 ... 61... 61.... every time I think about it I want to cry.

really, trully

when I was 49 I was cranking better than ever, at 52 I ripped my quads clean off of my knee!!! resulting 2+ years of major inactivity,it hurt.

then climbing overweight, tore the heck out of both shoulders...

just now getting better.. reading what other people are doing really helps me stay motivated to stay in the game.

e-kat....R-gold... jay... Jim and all the rest of you.

thanks
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 13, 2014 - 06:48pm PT
Whoa, Urmas. . . thank you, really!

oxoxo

And. . .Keesee, the aging thing doesn't hit me really hard until I see the number 64. I'm already a year older than my dad, his mom and my mom's dad when they took the chop and they seemed really OLD to me.

64 is the new 64.

WhodaThunk?

locker

Social climber
Some Rehab in Bolivia
Mar 13, 2014 - 07:27pm PT


For me the desire is just as much there today as it was in the beginning...

and other than getting myself in a situation where weather interfered heavily with my usual climbing schedule...

at 59 I am still able to get out there and spend a day cruising around on the rocks pretty much on the same level as I always have been...



I guess there is an advantage to being a sh!tty climber afterall...



;-)
sangoma

Trad climber
south africa
Mar 13, 2014 - 07:40pm PT
I was hanging out with my brothers friends one day and thought "you're just a bunch of old men" then realised that I was older than them !!!

Inside every older person is a younger person thinking what the heck hapened
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Mar 13, 2014 - 08:09pm PT
Inside every older person is a younger person thinking what the heck hapened

So true, G-gome and I were talking about this the other day. He said "don't feel bad... most people our age can't hardley get out of bed, let alone worry if it was 5.10 or 5.10c....."

well ... it's time to clock out and go to STONEY POINT, see what the kids are up to....
Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Mar 13, 2014 - 08:35pm PT
Met a 92 year old the other day and commented on how happy he seemed. When I asked the secret he said " You stay alive until your age finally matches the number of brain cells you have left."
moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 13, 2014 - 08:42pm PT
Aging gracefully.

photo not found
Missing photo ID#348901
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 13, 2014 - 09:01pm PT
Moose just moments from being slapped by a mannequin, again.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:23pm PT
Moose...drool, now I get it. Age gracefully, age anyway you want, but you will age....if you're lucky.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:26pm PT
OK! Great to read what my peers have to say on the subject.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts, they are appreciated, as we all work through this aging and climbing thread. I'm still having a gneiss-time, but you never know, until it gets schisty.

rgold gets points for most profound & funny post.

I identify best with Locker's post:
I guess there is an advantage to being a sh!tty climber afterall...

and Moosedroll made me snort up some wine.

I now will say!

Carry on till you're carrion! (I just made that quote up & I like it!)
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:31pm PT
Moose,
any pics of the twins?
or is that a touchy subject?
Mtnmun

Trad climber
Top of the Mountain Mun
Mar 13, 2014 - 09:31pm PT
I'm cracking up at this thread. Now in my 57th year, I blew my knee out a few weeks ago playing ultimate Frisbee on the beach. My left elbow has bad tendinitis from mountain biking. Damn it was fun getting injured like this. The young doc I saw yesterday said I have to rest....Nooooooooo!

My right side is working, I'll be hoppin and boppin to the crocodile rock.
wayne w

Trad climber
the nw
Mar 13, 2014 - 11:29pm PT
Paralytic Polio in 1953, at nine months, made any kind of climbing seem unlikely for myself. Major challenges in every decade since have made things more interesting yet, especially over half a century of dealing with Post Polio Syndrome. Though I am essentially jumaring, every push of a wall I do is filled with a deep sense of appreciation, enjoyment, satisfaction and power. The inspiration that I carry from my ascents I also pour into my paintings, and it also fuels my training with a constantly high degree of motivation. I never take extra rest days unless I've done a big project, and just work through injuries so I don't lose any conditioning. All of my partners are now much younger than I am, which is a good thing, because I want to keep at this game for a very long while.
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Mar 13, 2014 - 11:43pm PT
Though I am essentially jumaring, every push of a wall I do is filled with a deep sense of appreciation, enjoyment, satisfaction and power

What you have revealed here goes far beyond the mere words of advice the rest of us have given. Thank you.
rmuir

Social climber
From the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 14, 2014 - 01:55am PT
Don't age. Problem solved.
Quasimodo

Trad climber
CA
Mar 14, 2014 - 03:13am PT
In some respects I am a better climber at 54. I lack the explosive strength of my 20s and 30s but have better technique and a much better head. I struggled with adding a pound every year after 30 until I changed to a vegan diet two years ago. I am almost down to my ideal weight of 30 years ago. I added yoga three days a week with my wife one year ago. The added flexibility and core strength seems to protect me from injury and improves my movement on rock. I wish i discovered yoga and ate better over three decades ago. I feel better than ever until i look in the mirror and say, "Who the hell is that old guy?" it is a blessing that my close vision sucks.

I never really climbed hard compared to others. I try to focus on the movement, the outdoor experience, climbing friendships and the beautiful places to climb. I am more motivated today than ever. I just appreciate my continued good health and the opportunity to still climb up to 10c. I realize that dailing back the difficulty will likely allow me many more years of climbing without wasting precious time recovering from injuries. I see so many of my friends push really hard in their 50s and 60s only to spend months recovering from injuries and surgical procedures to fix torn knees, elbows and shoulders. I plan to follow Fred Becky's example by climbing well into my 80s.....God willing.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Mar 14, 2014 - 03:43am PT
paul crawford,
a local icon who's been putting up hard and serious routes since the 70's turned 55 this year.

he continues to lead hard 13 crack and face, v9 boulder problems,
and he climbs circles around me daily in our arbor-culture pursuits.

he lives a training regiment, just in his habit strides.
but he also does a little weight / finger board and rope climb training on the side.

i turn 40 next year, and i hope to hold up like paul has.
though i'd be keen to just lead 10's and remain active in the mountains
until a rotten old age.

Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 14, 2014 - 10:38am PT
I'm loving all the comments here from those climbers who are simply "getting their first glimmer" of what "lies ahead!"

My final advice to them: "Getting old beats the other alternative." Just keep at it at your sustainable level as long as you can.
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2014 - 10:45am PT
"Getting old beats the other alternative" Right on!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Mar 14, 2014 - 10:59am PT
I will say this,, when i took a break from climbing a couple of years after Dano died, that is when i began to fall apart slightly- one stops activities and then the ailments seem to creep in. Not stopping would have been smarter.;-) Ahhh the genius of hindsight..
MikeL

Trad climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Mar 14, 2014 - 11:14am PT
Quasimodo: "Who the hell is that old guy?"

LOL. Yeah. Who hasn't had the experience?
rmuir

Social climber
From the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 14, 2014 - 12:12pm PT
I've been 50 for six years now…

Yep, even men lie about their age.

At age 57, a good friend of mine was out walking the full-sized standard poodle after aggravating his arm and shoulder vacuuming the house. Something caught the poodle's eye, and the sudden jerk on the leash caused my buddy to watch (and feel) his bicep tear and roll up to his shoulder like a window blind. While visiting the "kind" surgeon and discussing the attendant risks involved, an inquiry was made about this age... "I'm fifty-seven," he says. "I don't know…it might be best to just leave it, since you don't have that much time left." Needless to say, said friend went off to get a second opinion! Postscript: After a successful reattachment of his bicep and lengthy recovery, he's got full mobility and is not dead yet.

We are all entering our corrosive years.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 15, 2014 - 12:11am PT
Mike, Laurie, Phillipe, John and Susan.
Collective years of climbing approximately 180.
Spent the day crushing, or at least gripping, will wash, rinse and repeat tomorrow.
Keepin' on as best we can

Joshua Tree
Joshua Tree
Credit: SCseagoat

Susan
mark miller

Social climber
Reno
Mar 15, 2014 - 12:25am PT
Well at 52 with 30 years in the construction industry, my dreams of climbing are fading away year by year. Some folks have been able to maintain their bodies well past my age but I haven't. I've fallen from dangerous ladder placements and messed up both hips. A delayed carpel tunnel issue has left me with 2 numb fingers on my right hand and something messed up in my spine shoots 120 volts down my right arm half of my waking hours. My right shoulder is about as useful as a raw piece of bacon. I debate about selling my ledge and haul bag everyday but I can't give up the dreams of climbing for over 36 years and the possibility of what tomorrow may hold. Getting old is knott for the week at heart.
jogill

climber
Colorado
Mar 15, 2014 - 12:41am PT
Mark, we can all sympathize with your predicament . . but for many others what Rodger says:

I'm loving all the comments here from those climbers who are simply "getting their first glimmer" of what "lies ahead!"

has a certain resonance for those of us in our 70s.
Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA (stuck in Jersey)
Mar 15, 2014 - 02:14am PT
I'm (51) and have literally spent the last, nearly two years of a sedentary life. God has different plans for me I'm finding out and I'd be lying if I said I didn't miss climbing. Instead, becoming the director of a Reformers Unanimous chapter in Gloucester City, NJ was in His plans, as well as my hobby becoming turbo-charging a tuner car, and keeping up with the broken parts. I'd still like to get back in shape and return to San Diego to mentor my eight year old there, instead of on the east coast.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Mar 15, 2014 - 08:31am PT
Mark Miller you get your ass back on that rock.

Now!

DMT
thedogfather

Trad climber
Somewhere near Red Rocks
Mar 15, 2014 - 09:33am PT
At 64, I stay motivated by doing the 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell in the fall each year (8 years in a row now). It gets me off the couch and helps me keep a balanced routine with cardio, climbing, core and gym workouts. Last year I got in 126 routes in the 24 and 64 routes in the 12 hour comp the day before. The key for me is to acknowledge that my power is going away but I can still do pretty well on the endurance side. My hardest thing to deal with is the fact that it is extremely hard to get my weight below 170 pounds. I am too old to cut out the enjoyment of good food (or even junk food). It helps that my wife is 49 ;) and she climbe 134 routes in the 24 last year and 64 in the 12. Having a partner to train with really keeps you on point.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 15, 2014 - 09:40am PT
Too much negativity from the troops....do not go quietly into the night!
"Corrosive Years".....corrosion occurs when things are left unattended.
If diminished performance is sapping your motivation remember....it's not the number attached to the climb that is important it's the quality of the experience.
I've rented the same place in Yosemite West that I had last Spring. I'll be there for the whole month of April....give me a shout if you want an attitude adjustment.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Mar 15, 2014 - 09:55am PT
This is my 40th year with only one hiatus.. Worst thing was that hiatus JD,, your spot on there. Climbing isnt a natural thing for the bod,, and if you slow up that indeed is when the corrosion starts.! Mentally as well as the physical. You ready for,,,,"SLEDS upda Nose"? ;-)
rmuir

Social climber
From the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 15, 2014 - 10:06am PT
A simple test for measuring corrosion is the weight loss method. The method involves exposing a clean weighed piece of the metal or alloy to the corrosive environment for a specified time followed by cleaning to remove corrosion products and weighing the piece to determine the loss of weight. The rate of corrosion (R) is calculated as
R = KW/(ρAt)
where k is a constant, W is the weight loss of the metal in time t, A is the surface area of the metal exposed, and ρ is the density of the metal (in g/cm³).
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 15, 2014 - 10:15am PT
Ron....how about rocking chairs upda Nose.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Mar 15, 2014 - 10:19am PT
Hehehe,, now why didnt I think of that! The chairs need arms on them,, sos i can claim armchair mountaineer status!
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Mar 15, 2014 - 10:37am PT
My one eyed Warrior stands strong straight and proud every morning, ready for duty.

How's that for not going quietly Donini?

But, he suffers no corrosion and gets regular workouts, so I guess that fits with your general principal.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 15, 2014 - 10:51am PT
R = KW/(ρAt)
where k is a constant, W is the weight loss of the metal in time t, A is the surface area of the metal exposed, and ρ is the density of the metal (in g/cm³).

So I guess the key to slowing the corrosion is to be really dense.
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:04am PT
My one eyed Warrior stands strong straight and proud every morning, ready for duty.

Survival for the win!

+1, and no little blue pills needed,



yet!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:10am PT
How did you know they were blue?
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:16am PT
^^^
I think you told me Jim? ;-)
moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:23am PT
At 59 I am quite fit. The problem is my health. I don't want to list all my problems, but half of the time I am sick. When I am not, I stay active. Climbing, skiing, biking, scuba diving, kayaking. Don't do white water kayaking or wind surfing anymore. Can't hike much either. But it's all good. When I am sick I can troll some more here. hehehe

Andrzej

P.S. One more thing changed. When I "accidentaly" check out a pretty women, my wife just loughs. She used to be jealous :(
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:38am PT
I find aging to be god's practical joke.

"Everyone who thinks they can do seven one-arm pullups on each arm take one step forward!"

"Uh, not so fast there sparky..."

I'm not exactly laughing my way through my golden years (whoever thought up that term certainly wasn't old when they coined it---I'm guessing the "g" at the beginning was a typo), but I can't help finding a lot of it pretty funny.

I mean, lying on your side while some guy drives a giant prostate biopsy machine up your arse, twiddling dials and snipping bits, putting them in little glass vials, and attaching mysterious GPS coordinates to each is, in spite of the humiliation and discomfort, really a hoot if you think about it.

"Hey doc, sharp curves ahead, back of the gas huh? Watch out for those potholes. Ouch! Dammit, yer gonna bend the chassis!"

And what if the nurse---yeah, there's always a nurse to drive home the message that your formerly awesome nakedness is of absolutely no interest to anyone---what if the nurse transposes the digits in one of those GPS labels?

"Well rgold, the results of your tests came out negative for cancer, but as far as we can tell you've got your head up your arse." (Giant biopsy machine and nurse-transposed GPS coordinates not needed for that diagnosis.)

Even the ordinary yearly checkup has its moments of levity.

Nurse: "Ok, lets see...5' 6 1/2 inches."

Rgold: "What? No way! I'm 5' 9" !"

Nurse: "Would you like me to redo that measurement (and help you combat the pitiful state of denial you seem to be mired in)?"

Rgold: "Yes please (you incompetent idiot---learn to read numbers off a scale fer chrissakes)."

Nurse: "Hmm, you're right, I did misread it. You're 5' 6", not 5' 6 1/2. (Hahaha, that'll teach him to question my readings.)"

Rgold: ("No wonder I was having trouble reaching that hold...") "Well, I really used to be 5' 9". (You just had to subtract that half-inch, didn't you!)"

Nurse: ("Sure you were. Next year you'll be saying you were 5' 10".)

Those numbers Donini mentioned as not mattering come up too.

Rgold: "WTF Dick, no way that route Geriatric's Demise is 5.7. Damn, its at least 5.9. Why the hell are you undergrading everything?"

Dick: "Rich, its a consensus grade. I talked to twenty people."

Rgold: "Yeah, twenty people each of who has done the route twenty times. Why don't you ask someone who just did it onsight for the first time?"

Dick: "Most of the folks I asked have only done Geriatric's once Rich. (The route is way too boring to ever bother repeating.)"

Rgold: "This is all the fault of gym climbing, sport climbing, gang-bouldering, birthday parties at climbing walls, and thirteen year old girls who weigh eighty pounds. Nobody knows what the grades should be any more. Things started going to hell when the replaced manila climbing ropes with nylon. Preuss sure as hell knew how to tell 5.7 from 5.9."

Dick: ("I'm just gonna keep quiet until he calms down and takes his midday nap.")

--------


Note: British slang for the posterior used to keep the Super Topo automatic censor at bay.

Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:43am PT
When I first visited Chamonix in 1976, one of the things that made an impression were the old people of that community. As we walked down from climbs, we often met elderly Chamoniards hiking up for a picnic on the forested bench below the Aiguilles.

Some were in their eighties, and all looked fit and content to just walk among beautiful mountains. When my climbing days end, I hope to emulate them.
Stewart Johnson

climber
lake forest
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:47am PT
Orion Direct
Orion Direct
Credit: Stewart Johnson

Sitting still is not an option at 54
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:51am PT
Rick, I remember seeing the same groups of Chamoniards in 1985; a worthy example to aspire to!
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2014 - 01:09pm PT
Communal check in; though as globally impressive as pocket lint, after 20 days in the cave man straights I've lost 13 lbs putting me closer to string bean than I've been in a decade. Actually a cpl roasts less than previous optimal climbing weight. Very stoked. Off all the fun stuff, working out semi-daily and feeling better and stronger than ever expected. In all that the real success is improved personal paradigm. I think on some level a wimp was taking control. Gill's earlier words (among many others) really struck a high note. Attitude plays a crazy role in performance. Good stuff.
wivanoff

Trad climber
CT
Mar 15, 2014 - 01:58pm PT
Hit 60 last September.

Osteoarthritis in lower back and heart surgery has slowed me down a bit. I'm not climbing anywhere near as hard as I used to. And I had to tone done leading while on the anti-platelet meds.

Back to leading easy/moderate routes and I'm having more fun now than in the previous 39 years of climbing.
moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 15, 2014 - 02:45pm PT
Not long ago, when I had a hard-on, I could barely push it away from my chest.

Now, my hands got too weak.

;)

Moose
tradmanclimbs

Ice climber
Pomfert VT
Mar 15, 2014 - 04:59pm PT
stomach bug kicked my butt this week. skinned about 3/4 mile and barely crawled up a 35m 4- today. Feeling old fer sure...
CClarke

climber
La Paz, Bolivia
Mar 15, 2014 - 10:39pm PT
My friend Roberto pointing out our next project after we made the first ascent of a 10 pitch 5.11 yesterday:

Credit: CClarke

Perhaps not cutting edge or even within sight of the cutting edge but it beats taking up golf.
Trusty Rusty

climber
Tahoe Area
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2014 - 10:52pm PT
Looks like an awesome project CC. Golf will wait.
STEEVEE

Social climber
HUMBOLDT, CA
Mar 15, 2014 - 11:04pm PT

Not long ago, when I had a hard-on, I could barely push it away from my chest.

Now, my hands got too weak.

LMAO!

Thanks "Moose". That brought tears to my eyes.
Stewart Johnson

climber
lake forest
Mar 16, 2014 - 03:00am PT
Topping out match point  <br/>
Ben Nevis
Topping out match point
Ben Nevis
Credit: Stewart Johnson
It helps to get on the plane for a
Fresh perspective
rmuir

Social climber
From the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:35pm PT
Man. This thread is turning into a geriatric organ recital!
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:40pm PT
^^^ ugh . . . would you turn up the volume, please?



;>|
Modesto Mutant

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, CA
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:42pm PT
I'm bouncing back and forth between riding my bike like a bat out of hell and feeling too crappy to get out of bed. I'm at 17 lbs which is 20 lbs over my 'fighting weight' when I could still lead Valley 5.10 and I'm 20 lbs below my golfing weight.
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:47pm PT
I'm at 17 lbs

Good lord, man . . . you must use the rope to tether you like a kite!


;>)
mark miller

Social climber
Reno
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:50pm PT
Ron I kinda like the sleds up the nose approach...Can I do the greta roof pitch and that other great pitch and then get air lifted off the top?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:53pm PT
It works fabulously over at "SOE" (SLeds OVER EVEREST) Mark!


And Jgill,, im thinking he can lead on 5mm eh! LOL!
mynameismud

climber
backseat
Mar 16, 2014 - 07:08pm PT
51 was fighting hard to get my weight down and getting nowhere even though I was eating less and slowly increasing exercise. Went mostly vegan ( I cheat every two weeks to a Month) and dropped just over 10 pounds in about two months. My knees and back feel better and I feel more rested even though I am sleeping less. My cholesterol went below 190 for the first time in my life and my blood pressure is great. I am more motivated than I have been in years. I am eating more than when I was dieting to lose weight. Give it a shot, nothing to lose except weight. If I had not just dislocated my finger on the road bike I think I would be back to 11’s in a week, two weeks at the most.

mark miller

Social climber
Reno
Mar 16, 2014 - 07:10pm PT
Thanks Ron my hips and knees are feelin' better already.The last time Shack and I tried a route up the column I was in need of medical treatment even before the route started. We even used deer sleds to haul the gear in...
If you drink enough alcohol you won't have the problem with the cholesterol...Doctors can't believe how low mine is. Phuck the liver. I was always hopping of dieing(sp?) young and leaving a good looking corpse, who was I fooling.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Mar 16, 2014 - 07:15pm PT
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 16, 2014 - 07:36pm PT
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Mar 16, 2014 - 07:39pm PT
Nice eKat
hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Mar 16, 2014 - 08:56pm PT
Pretty good article in the New Yorker about being 90.
"all of us see ourselves as being 17 with red rosy lips"

I butchered the quote but that's the gist.
Two things to try and avoid. Debt and obesity. Both are hard to shake when you've got a case of it.
54 Years old. I'm trying to lose 5 lbs or so and wrapping up the Nordic season- It's been kinda cold up North so not quite the miles I was hoping for. It was pretty fun though. Yesterday, on fast snow, we skated 22 kms. in about an hour and a half. Finishing spring break I skied 140 kms. over the last 8 days. Maybe a week or so left and then it will be time to grease the bicycle.
Looking forward to retiring- not so much to escape working but more as an opportunity to do some other things. Read and study Geology, maybe a little sailing, biking and skiing. I hope to keep recreating-a little bursitis in the hips but why go there?
After reading the rest of this thread I'm stoked and I'm going to buy a couple more pairs of skis--not because I "need" them- but because they're going to be fun and I'm grooving thinking about that!
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 16, 2014 - 09:08pm PT
Thanks, StahlBro. . . I loved Mason Williams when I was a kid, that particular little ditty I posted turned me on the Dylan Thomas, who I learned to love, as well. It took some time, exposing my little kidself to such heavy thoughts, but I came around.


Here In This spring

Here in this spring, stars float along the void;
Here in this ornamental winter
Down pelts the naked weather;
This summer buries a spring bird.

Symbols are selected from the years'
Slow rounding of four seasons' coasts,
In autumn teach three seasons' fires
And four birds' notes.

I should tell summer from the trees, the worms
Tell, if at all, the winter's storms
Or the funeral of the sun;
I should learn spring by the cuckooing,
And the slug should teach me destruction.

A worm tells summer better than the clock,
The slug's a living calendar of days;
What shall it tell me if a timeless insect
Says the world wears away?

Dylan Thomas
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Mar 16, 2014 - 11:26pm PT
Age well!

Heidi & I had a big work-day of spring clean-up on the ranchette at Choss Creek today.

At 6:00 PM we dragged chairs out onto the deck, for Gin & Tonics and enjoyed springtime & life.

Heidi turns 60 in April and I'm half-way throught 64.

Please have some fun along the way to old age.

Credit: Fritz
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Mar 16, 2014 - 11:31pm PT
Do not model your life on Dylan Thomas.


;>\
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 17, 2014 - 08:45am PT
^ ^ ^ I copy. . . he was a tripper!
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 17, 2014 - 09:18am PT
Who didn't make it to his fifties.....
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 17, 2014 - 09:29am PT
Make that forties. . . which is fifties, as well, eh?

:-)
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Mar 17, 2014 - 12:10pm PT
Fritz and Heidi?

CHEERS!!!!1111

DMT
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 17, 2014 - 12:51pm PT
Fritz and Heidi!

Ya' both are looking great!!
Andy Fielding

Trad climber
UK
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:20pm PT
When I turned 50 (two years ago) I read Psychovertical by Andy Kirkpatrick. I then got my 34 year old copy of Yosemite Climber off the shelf and said to myself "I have to climb there". 6 months later I was in Camp 4 and did a host of classic routes. I returned again last year and in June I'm coming back to do the Regular NW face on HD. There is a saying; "We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing". Play on people.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:23pm PT
Why is Fritz holding his breath?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:30pm PT

There are four types of cranes in Chinese myth: White, yellow, blue and black. The black crane is thought to live the longest - up to 600 years. When a crane is shown among clouds it stands for longevity, widsom and nobility. When shown among pine trees, the crane symbolizes determination, wealth and power. When two cranes are shown together, it is the ultimate depiction of longevity.
moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:36pm PT
Penis longa, vita brevis.

Or something like that.

Moose
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:37pm PT
I am mostly just a poser but I DID do a 57 mile bike ride yesterday to commemorate my 57th birthday.

Credit: Sewellymon
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Lassitude 33
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:48pm PT
Happy B-Day Jeff!
SicMic

climber
across the street from Marshall, CO
Mar 17, 2014 - 03:40pm PT
You're only as old as those you feel. - Messner
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Mar 17, 2014 - 03:49pm PT
Sometimes are harder than others to age gracefully through.

50 + mph winds here today. The spruce tree gracefully reposed onto our garage this morning. My chainsaw is inside the garage, directly under the tree. Still blowing way too hard to approach the ugly task of cleanup.

Credit: Fritz

Credit: Fritz

Schist happens!
Seamstress

Trad climber
Yacolt, WA
Mar 17, 2014 - 06:05pm PT
In the spirit of fighting old age viciously, my poor body has been pummelled into submissions. Worked on legs with personal trainer on Friday. Saturday, we did a mock rescue mission way out on St. Helens. I insisted that I should not operate the snowmobile in marginal conditions since I rarely ride one. Got on the back and held on for dear life as we flew through the brush. My legs look like my husband beat me unmercifully. Got to the steeper section, then took off on foot for the last 1/2 mile to the "patient". OMG - postholing with 42 pounds on my back on a steep hill was damn hard. Snowshoes did not help one bit. Plummetted through tree branches in a tree well on a steep hill. Crwled out with my pack hanging up on every twig. Finally made "patient" access. This was humbling. I took solace in that only 2 of us made patient access all day. The youngsters never arrived......

Went for a 2 hour 30 minutes run on Sunday in the rain. Plunged straight into the hot tup afterward, then assumed the horizontal position on the couch for the rest of the day. Not fast. Not enough distnace covered. This better payoff with fabulous fitness as the snow melts!!!

Keep fighting! Never surrender!
Tadman

Mountain climber
CA
Mar 17, 2014 - 07:47pm PT
54 years young
54 years young
Credit: Tadman
Tadman

Mountain climber
CA
Mar 17, 2014 - 07:49pm PT
Still 54
Still 54
Credit: Tadman

Do not go quietly...
MH2

climber
Mar 17, 2014 - 11:03pm PT
Penis longa, vita brevis.


One good thing about hanging with the older crowd; you get the classical education.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 17, 2014 - 11:05pm PT
Way!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 17, 2014 - 11:28pm PT
Aging is a gift not everyone recieves....just hope that it is the gift that keeps on giving.
MH2

climber
Mar 19, 2014 - 12:18am PT

Off-the-beaten path aging strategies?

"I fight against the gluttony of time with so many very amusing weapons--with gestures and with three attitudes and with charming phrases; with tears and with tinsel, and with sugar-coated pills, and with platitudes slightly regilded. Yes, and I fight him also with little mirrors wherein gleam confusedly the corruptions of lust, and ruddy loyalty, and a bit of moonshine, and the pure diamond of the heart's desire, and the opal cloudings of human compromise: but, above all, I fight that ravening dotard with the strength of my own folly."

James Branch Cabell
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