RAD System for Top-Rope Soloing

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Messages 81 - 86 of total 86 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Mickster

Social climber
New Jack City, CA
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2015 - 11:10am PT
I'd like to express my sincere appreciation to the five people who actually provided well thought-out, relevant and coherent feedback on this particular ascending/descending system, and its possible adaptation to top-rope soloing on climbs that are well below one's limit.

As for all the off-topic posts saying "this is how to top-rope solo," or only saying, without further explanation, "there are better ways to do it," you apparently missed my point, which I've surely repeated ad nauseum. Just because you have an opinion about something doesn't mean it will be valued, especially when you're not accurately addressing the strengths and weaknesses of the specific system that was presented.

I simply don't know how to respond appropriately to anyone who brags about their free-soloing exploits or alludes to their expertise in lead soloing, when it has nothing to do with this topic. "Bully for you," perhaps? And, I confess that I am totally mystified by rambling posts that seem to be about how TR-soloing was done in the old days.

To those who don't like my attitude, or take issue with me on a personal level, all I can say is that I'm glad I've stirred things up, and thank you for playing.

Climb on!
JimT

climber
Munich
Mar 22, 2015 - 11:20am PT
If you didnīt want our opinion then why did you post in the first place?
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Mar 22, 2015 - 11:23am PT
Lol! Exactly Jim...
Brian More

climber
Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
Aug 9, 2015 - 06:48pm PT
I'm psyched to see this post, must have missed it in 2012. I've tried the mini-traxion method, and I got in trouble when I was gassed and wanted to get down. I wasn't able to unweight the device to attach a rappel device. After I thrashed around for a minute I think I went batman or something-fuzzy memory- and walked off the back . Anyway, after that I came up with the "F.A.R.T." system (Warren Harding acronym-wink wink). "Famously Asinine Ridiculous Theory". Seriously though: run an 11mm static line through some anchors, walk back down, tie one end to your harness with a figure eight. Run the tag end through the gri gri (the correct direction-ha), get on the climb, suck up the slack with your free hand as you ascend. No back up, but if you did whip (not really-ha) then even so the gri would catch you-right? Maybe a little slippage? I've used the "F.A.R.T." method for a while now and have yet to crater-my route selections are dyno free. Note: tried it on ice and the gri- gri doesn't like the wet rope. I'm ready for "slayage" but thought I should let you know that if it gets too bad I'm the poster formerly known as "Weld-it". Ha- Thanks!
tripmind

Boulder climber
San Diego
Aug 9, 2015 - 10:58pm PT
Too much expensive hardware for me to really care enough to try it.

I was thinking of a simpler method, perhaps a bit more dangerous.

The method would mean tying upwards of 4-8 inline figure 8 knots with a loop into a standard dynamic rope. The loops/knots should be placed about 5 feet apart, you would then walk to the top of the climb and very securely attach it to a SOLID anchor, 3 bomber attachment points mandatory.

Recommended using 7-9mm power cord to synch the normal double harness loops together so that fall forces would be on the intended part of the harness, after synching the loops close together, knot the cord with a figure 8 leaving a loop with a very solid knot to keep the cord tied together, that loop will then be your clip in point, and its intended to prevent cross-loading a carabiner. You could also use two cords for redundancy.

Simply put you will clip yourself into each loop as you climb. From here you would have several options for clipping in.

1. Each loop would have its own carabiner, you will remove one carabiner for each one you clip in as you climb
2. Use only two carabiners, one will stay clipped into your harness while you move the other carabiner to the next loop on the rope
3. Leave every carabiner and loop of rope clipped into your harness for extra redundancy

The main problem that this will permit is the lack of shock mitigation that having a belayer would normally provide.

I'm thinking if you could get your hands on an industrial size spring device, perhaps something similar to those large spring scales that were once used to weigh large chunks of meat on a large hanging scale during older times, they could provide some mitigation of shock loading to prevent short rope falls. I'm sure there is some sort of device still in use today in the industrial world that does just this and probably doesn't cost a ton.

Welp, that's my idea for a simple rope solo'ing method. Has anyone tried something similar? Would anyone think this idea to not be too crazy? I'd be willing to give it a shot on a relatively easy climb if anyone wanted to see it tested...
Gnome Ofthe Diabase

climber
Out Of Bed
Aug 10, 2015 - 12:32am PT
Tripmind
Yup!
Often clipped high and low. - Sometimes using locking or doubles 'biners, and completely separate points of pro. To hang - or not, but gives a third , at the ready - backup to the backups.
That is my redundant system, I have a pre tied dynamic rope with loops custom set at various points along the length of rope. for a specific project. Sometimes very tight ,small loops that 'lock' the 'biners' orientation
when I have had to I have fixed the rope with clip in points on both sides of the anchor point. This when for directional or something, overgrown or needing work, I leave that bit set with ( trickery ) any thing from prussic to the wall- hauler. ( if that makes any sense?)haha hay your mileage WILL vary!

Then,????

I can't tell from your post but - two independent lines anchored at the top.-

I am on a' semi-static' 'program' rope through the Gri" " also by adding weight to this line you creat a self feeding (ish) set up . Here the OP adds . . . . . .and there is nothing wrong with that.

Getting the climbing line weight rite - the amount of slack if it or the back-up are fixed. Has been key.


I am a big fan of both the Croll and the Shunt, and as I showed, for entertainment, and curiosity, the 'Robot ' which does an awesome job.


. . . . . . . . .. . . ..
After this thread some climbers that I had known for many years got the chopp TR rope soling,
The causes of the catastrophic failure were all user error, no one will ever know for sure, bees? A moment of incomprehensible lack of focus? Due to complacency?, no way to know hard to comprehend.

I have since substantially cut back on roped soloing and looked in to getting a modern device.

I have used the same soloing system for years and only once ever had the misfortune to fall slowly, thus sliding, not locking the Gri" " I was clipped in to loops low and slid off into space. That was on vertical to over hanging terrain though. Then to trolley or pull in to get back on the rock, requires the climber to be at risk of stock loading that protection, ( no 'dentil floss' draws) if they blow off short directly onto the backup looped line so it is key that dynamic webbing or climbing rope is used. . . . . . .

back from re reading your post.

CHEST HARNESS! I was also able to go with out and in a pinch use an over the shoulder noose! Ha ha, any way it sounds like you have it right.


But you should never trust any information that you see on the Internet, it is worth being shown how to use the newest and best technology available by a person who knows what they are doing , and then, doing it in front of that person on a third top rope with a standard belay.
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