New Mountain Bike required? (OT)

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Messages 141 - 160 of total 198 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
kaholatingtong

Trad climber
Nevada City
Aug 13, 2014 - 05:54pm PT
I really wish I had the money to upgrade, but unfortunately its just not to be for the time being. More of a fitness for me currently anyways, but I am sure that could change with a different bike.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Canada
Aug 13, 2014 - 06:50pm PT
Susan,

A dropper seatpost costs less than that stainless steel boat pulley you though was essential. I can understand a titanium propeller but really, where does ease and expense collide ?
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2014 - 10:29pm PT
Post ride after the night shift.

Credit: Jebus H Bomz

First time I've run the local trail in a while because of summer temps, etc and it feels so much different now that I've been throwing myself on the Tahoe classics. Way more mellow! There is one tortuous switchback that throws some big rocks at you I still need to clean up, but it's way different now and I charged the whole thing. The downs after Downieville, etc I run a lot faster, though I still need work. And, well, I'd rather not push it so hard the scrub factor rears too high.

The upgrades are arriving, I just need to find the time to install them. I can't wait! I think the bike will be pretty much a completely equipped fun machine after those are added.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Sep 1, 2014 - 07:03pm PT



Jebus H Bomz that is some exposure!
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 7, 2014 - 03:46pm PT
Agreed, Wilbeer! That trail looks slightly more committing than the Flume Trail, LOL! Holy cow.

I got the goodies installed on my bike:

Credit: Jebus H Bomz

Credit: Jebus H Bomz

Longer handlebar, shorter stem, a dropper post, and a chain guide/bash guard.

Not sure to the utility of the chain guide yet, but the other items are definite winners. I took the bike out for a stroll yesterday, and the biggest surprise of the dropper post for me is how much better it makes climbing. Being up higher than usual in the "climb" mode of my post (I got the FOX DOSS, a three position dropper post) maximized the power better going uphill. The only trick is when things get a little more technical, you don't necessarily want to be perched higher. And, of course, dropping the post on the downhills makes handling way better.

The wider bars definitely improved downhill handling, although right out of the gate I ironically thumped the bar end on a gate because the increased length. Oh well.

The chain guide/bash guide did a weird "thump" during the ride, I'm not sure quite what happened, I think it switched from one of the two gears in the device. Probably was a waste of money, that piece, but we'll give it a little time to suss out.

I felt like death on the ride itself, unfortunately. I ate a big ass breakfast burrito just before and then the temps were smoking up on Peavine. That coupled with exhaustion from more work and life crap left me taking more water breaks than usual. The initial sussing is out of the way though, I am pretty psyched on getting the updated rig on some more Tahoe goodness when I get time!
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 7, 2014 - 04:01pm PT
Of course, with the upcoming move back to Sacramento, I am now partially regretting my sale of the road bike to fund the mtb parts. A carbon framed road bike wasn't quite the utili bike I would want anyway though. With the flats of the Central Valley, maybe even a sturdy, low maintenance fixie would be the ticket. The cyclocross/gravel bikes that seem popular also resonate though. It would be nice to take the bike trails in Sacramento, passing the weaker roadies with aplomb before diving off onto a horse trail for a diversion...
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Sep 7, 2014 - 04:18pm PT
Nice upgrades Jebus,that bike is looking better all the time.I like wide bars,you definitely use all of their leverage,climbing or descending.

As I am, I am finding I am riding me crossbike more and more ,commuting,zero approach rides and general mountain biking.
They make blue mountain bike trails,more like black diamond.But they are so damn light,you can whip them around good.

Get a frame,build up as you go.

As they are saying,make a mutt.
Letchworth State Park,N.Y.
Letchworth State Park,N.Y.
Credit: wilbeer
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 7, 2014 - 04:29pm PT
Thanks, Wilbeer. I think I've gotten the bike largely where I want it. The only things I could do differently would be a lighter wheelset or the like, or more cosmetic things but the rig is definitely rideable.

I like your build idea and the cyclocross/commuter looks like a fun genre. Plus, the gradual build suits the married man's budgetary guidelines pretty well.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Sep 7, 2014 - 05:00pm PT
Hear that.

My bikes are just framesets,with parts kits passed down from other framesets.I have been around it awhile and things just come toghether.

But ,I was married,so I know....LOL.

Cheers
Credit: wilbeer
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 12, 2014 - 07:41am PT
So, during my ride from Big Meadows yesterday and (inadvertently) partway down Toad's (I didn't want to continue once I realized since I did not shuttle to the trailhead), I experienced the devastating uphill grind again. I felt like my heart was going to explode like in Kill Bill. Yikes!

I think I sussed the problem though, the new chain guide I had installed is not holding the chain in when I switch to my big front ring and back to the small (2x10 drivetrain) and the chain winds up between a cog and the housing of the guide. I kept thinking my tires were flat or something! It really isn't terrain you want some additional, soul robbing drag on while you toil.

Not that the trail is casual up to the TRT though. Bouldering on mtb, more like it.

I wonder if anybody else has had the chain guide problem and if it's worthwhile to try and tinker with again or just remove the damned thing?
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Lassitude 33
Sep 12, 2014 - 08:12am PT
The chain guide is (imo) a waste of money and weight (and potentially problematic) unless you are building a downhill bike. Nice looking rig.
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 12, 2014 - 09:05am PT
It appears so, sketchy... I believe ebay is in order.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Lassitude 33
Sep 12, 2014 - 10:38am PT
Something like these would help immensely with cranking uphill, the pedals you have are (like the chain guide) more of a downhill set up.
Clipless pedals
Clipless pedals
Credit: looking sketchy there...
coolrockclimberguy69

climber
Sep 12, 2014 - 10:44am PT
The chain guide is (imo) a waste of money and weight

Clutch derailleurs and narrow-wide chainrings are going to make chain guides obsolete on trail bikes over the next couple of years (maybe even for dh bikes, too). I'm running a regular "old school" 1x9 with a chain guide and I still get tons of chain slap. I even added a homemade guide (out of automotive hose, rubber stopper and zipties) behind my real chain guide and I still get tons of noise. Definitely upgrading to a clutch 1x11 drivetrain when I have the money.

Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 12, 2014 - 10:46am PT
Ah, yes, I'm quite familiar with clipless pedals, I was formerly running them on this bike. I've gone to flats purposefully, I find the gains in confidence for both the uphill and downhill here in the Tahoe area more than pays off for me right now. The trails around here often make you a de facto downhiller, and the technical ups are also nice not to run clipless to get that foot down pronto!

edit: Next week I think I'll get on the old Toad's finally. That'll test the downhill limits of my rig!
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Sep 12, 2014 - 11:22am PT
Glad this thread still has some life. Looks like I'll FINALLY have some free cash this fall to upgrade my rig from a 20 yr. Specialized hardtail. Since they've been out for a little at least, anyone have any feedback on 27.5 vs. 29ers? I know just need to get out on both sets of wheels, but it will probably be limited to short test rides on fire roads, so I'm curious if anyone has any thoughts who've ridden both in a variety of settings. I'm looking at the 27.5 mainly because I'm 5'7" and the geometry on some of the 29 frames doesn't seem optimal for shorter riders.
stilltrying

Trad climber
washington indiana
Sep 12, 2014 - 01:24pm PT
Just converted my 09 GF Superfly from the original 3 x 9 to a 1 x 9. Very simple, kept the same 9 speed cassette, removed front derailuer, front shifter pod and crank set. Installed 30 tooth Wolf Tooth (wide/narrow) chain ring, new '10' speed chain ( necessary for chain stability). No chain guide needed even with no clutch. Works great. May go to 10 speed later or even Sram XX1(11 speed) if price comes down. One front crank is coming into it's own with the wide/narrow set ups. Very smooth, works well and leaves more room for dropper post control on left side. Wolf Tooth's web site is very helpful. Lots of good youtube videos on the Sram XX1 detailing their setup. You can go to a 28 tooth crank on the Sram Crankset.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Lassitude 33
Sep 12, 2014 - 03:22pm PT
Since they've been out for a little at least, anyone have any feedback on 27.5 vs. 29ers? I know just need to get out on both sets of wheels, but it will probably be limited to short test rides on fire roads, so I'm curious if anyone has any thoughts who've ridden both in a variety of settings. I'm looking at the 27.5 mainly because I'm 5'7" and the geometry on some of the 29 frames doesn't seem optimal for shorter riders.

I have ridden 26 (my current set-up), 29 and 27.5. The 27.5 was set up as a 1x11. The 27.5 only took a couple rides to get comfortable with the geometry and differences in tight cornering. For me, barely 5.10 with shortish legs, the 29er is not an ideal fit, and not as nimble on tight technical climbs.

While I liked the simplicity of the 1x11, I found it difficult to get ideal gearing for the wide variety of terrain I ride. If you get a larger front chainring to get good speed on flats (which the bike I used did), unless I got way stronger, I could not power up real steep technical climbs. A small front chainring would be my choice (30 or even 28).

Even with an 11 rear cluster, with a single chainring up front there were noticeable "gaps" on some shifts and I ended up using less than ideal gearing. Maybe, I just needed to adjust (get stronger) -- like when riding a single speed.

YMMV
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Sep 12, 2014 - 03:34pm PT
Thanks sketchy. I definitely don't have the knees for an 11x1. Since having my knee rebuilt a couple of times way back when, I spin an easy gear at a pretty high cadence on long climbs. I can bump it up to a bigger gear for short periods of time but I can't mash big gears for long without my knees paying for it.
skitch

climber
East of Heaven
Sep 12, 2014 - 04:30pm PT
Fat Dad;

The new 1x11 uses a 42 tooth cog in the rear, which combined with a 30t in the front is pretty much the same as a 22x34 setup. The best thing about 1x11 (or a 1x10 hack like I have) is the simplicity due to one less derailleur. I also run a dropper post so I have free space for the lever on the left side since I don't have a shifter there!

As to wheel size: it's a F*#KING GIMMICK!!!! Get a bike that fits and learn to ride it!!! That said there are upsides and downsides to each wheel size (I'm 6'4" tall and ride 29"), small wheels seem easier to get around corners (which "may" also have a lot to do the shorter wheelbase) but get stalled on rocks/roots that bigger wheels roll over easier. Once you are up to speed you shouldn't notice as much, unless you try to make a tight turn on a 29er, then you'll either have to throw it around that corner, or slow down more!

That's my opinion/experience. If you are going to race cross country you may want to look at a 29er, or even 27.5. If you are going to ride down trails popping off of every little bump then you would probably have more fun on a 26" bike. Once you decide which bike to get you won't be worried about how big your wheels are when you are actually on the trail, only when you are bored at work looking at all the new marketing, I mean new bikes. . .
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