Buzzed (Again) By Condors at Pinnacles

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 61 - 68 of total 68 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 6, 2014 - 08:09pm PT
They point is the Army is completely satisfied with the new round.
So hunters, please clean up your ammunition.

The army isn't interested in and is constricted by international law from using a round that produces a reliable and humane kill.

Not to mention that a human being is about half the size of even a medium size deer and quite a bit more fragile.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Jul 6, 2014 - 10:00pm PT
Awesome pic. Reminds me of climbing in North Wales as RAF fighter jets flew up the valley below. Which isn't that far below c'os it's Britain.....
clinker

Trad climber
Santa Cruz, California
Jul 6, 2014 - 10:56pm PT
That's what happens when condor sees you rap bolting

They were fixing a bad bolt and would slit their own wrists rather than rap-bolt at the Pinns, Troublemaker.

How is that manufractured crack on the Captain's West face coming?
couchmaster

climber
Jul 7, 2014 - 08:30am PT
Rob Roy Ramey said:
"Once, while watching the condor incubate the fake egg, I observed a raven landing at the cave entrance. The condor stood up to defend the egg but the raven quickly dashed in and pecked a hole in it. Fortunately, it was the wax-filled fake. This same pair of ravens would raid swallow nests on the cliffs by pecking out the bottoms of the nests by clinging to the cliff while flapping. Subsequently, we found that in 7 out of 10 condor nest territories with known cases of egg breakage, we also found condor eggshells in nearby raven nests (those within 1/4 mile). We expect that it was a learned behavior, which was why ravens that displayed egg-eating tendencies near condor nests were dispatched. The peril now is that if ravens start eating eggs elsewhere and that behavior spreads through a population, that will be the end of successful condor nesting in the area. With raven populations far above natural levels in the West, this is not only a threat to condors but other species as well (i.e. sage grouse). "

Ravens are widely known to commonly raid many other birds nests and eat the eggs. Rob Roy, I'm curious, did you or the biologists consider bait eggs of DRC-1339 to kill the Ravens that preyed on the nests (Delaney and Coates studies of Raven predation on Sage Grouse eggs). Also, it's interesting that you make this out to be a possible extinction issue for the Condors, but the regular news doesn't mention egg predation of Condor eggs by Ravens at all. Any idea why?
Bluelens

climber
Pasadena, CA
Jul 7, 2014 - 03:42pm PT
The California Department of Fish and Wildlife is accepting public comments about the implementation of AB711 banning most uses of lead ammunition on or before July 1, 2019 throughout the state of California.
Comments should be sent to wildlifemgmt@wildlife.ca.gov before July 28.
The Wildlife Resources Committee, a Committee of the California Fish and Game Commission meets July 28th. The California Condor and AB711 implementation is part of the meeting agenda.
As lead from ammunition is the number one cause of California Condor death and illness it is in the best interest of the Condor (and anyone else, human or wild, eating game taken with ammunition) for this legislation to be implemented sooner rather than later. The law was written to provide for phase-in implementation to start in 2015 with full implementation on or before July 1, 2019.
A PowerPoint presentation re some of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s concerns in developing the implementation plan for AB 711 is available at https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashxDocumentID=77723&inline=1 The location of this document on the California Department of Fish and Wildlife has changed in the past, so the link may not work and you’ll need to search the website at wildlife.ca.gov.
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jul 7, 2014 - 06:00pm PT
knowing that condors are protected....

If one decided to buzz me while I'm climbing I usually get out...

I suppose that could be one of the reasons for the bird swooping in the first place, right?

But then again, climbers gotta climb, and that's more important, isn't it? Our climbing?

then I read how condors are dying.. and then I read how condor only mate once about every 2 years... then I read that piece above..
Once, while watching the condor incubate the fake egg, I observed a raven landing at the cave entrance. The condor stood up to defend the egg but the raven quickly dashed in and pecked a hole in it. Fortunately, it was the wax-filled fake. This same pair of ravens would raid swallow nests on the cliffs by pecking out the bottoms of the nests by clinging to the cliff while flapping. Subsequently, we found that in 7 out of 10 condor nest territories with known cases of egg breakage, we also found condor eggshells in nearby raven nests (those within 1/4 mile).
and I thought to myself is it really that important that I continue my climbing in the face of this dying bird species swiping at me like it does?

It's always good to know that we humans are way better than all other animals on this planet....
Bluelens

climber
Pasadena, CA
Jul 7, 2014 - 11:10pm PT
No worries about swooping condors, climbers. Condors are highly curious. If they cruise close to a climber, they're just checking out what's happening. All condor nests are monitored by volunteers or USFWS biologists. So, for now climbers don't need to worry about interrupting a condor in its nest cave.
They fly fast so you might only hear a whoosh before you realize what's just cruised your way. There are far fewer condors than peregrine falcons If you see a condor, count yourself privileged. These are magnificent creatures.
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Jul 8, 2014 - 06:49pm PT
Question:
Aren't all California Condors tagged?
You can see the tags clearly in Mungeclimber's pic on previous page. They are carefully monitored from egg laying to hatching. I thought they are all tagged as fledgelings.
Messages 61 - 68 of total 68 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Trip Report and Articles
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews