Does the Access Fund have the guts to preserve desert routes

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Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2014 - 12:19pm PT
Well I'm glad that people are appreciating the conflicting interests that the thread title implies.

There is another issue where values collide;

paddlefooting behavior.


As climbers we are all about challenging ourselves and pushing our limits, but when many climbers get close to their maximum free climbing abilities they can get sloppy and flail, which can result in rock damage.

Can people be expected to climb well within their abilities to conserve rock?
crunch

Social climber
CO
Feb 21, 2014 - 12:27pm PT
A huge problem I see with a video or photo presentation is the management folks might see this and decide to end all rock climbing in that area.

Hmmmmm. Good point. Actually, that's why I like the video component of the presentation idea. If any random concerned climber goes to meet a random land manager, who knows where things will go.

But a good video controls the message.

It should firmly establish a strong, historic legacy tying climbing strongly to the park in question. It should make clear that climbing is a valuable, valid, long-established use.

In Zion it dates back 46 years to the first ascent of the Pulpit by Eric Bjornstad and Fred Beckey in 1967. Most other parks throughout the West have long connections with climbing and climbers. Canyonlands NP it goes back to 1962 (two years before the park existed). Arches NP Dark Angel, early '60s.

(Other user groups don't have such a strong legacy. That's partly why other human-powered activities like base jumping, slack-lining and mountain biking are treated poorly in the National Park system. We climbers have always been there. We sort of get grandfathered in.)

Anyway, once that's dealt with, the video should illustrate exactly what damage/wear and tear the climbing community want to show and explain why it adversely affects climbers' experiences. There should be suggestions (TK) for improving the experience for future users of the rock. There needs to be specific, easily achievable measures (TK, TK) that land-managers can adopt (or adapt) to better sustain the high-quality recreational values that the park is tasked with promoting.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2014 - 12:51pm PT
It goes back a lot farther than 46 years crunch.

What about Donald Orcutt? The Crawford cousins on the Steamboat? Glen Dawson? Fritz Weisner?
Joshua Johnson

Boulder climber
Boulder
Feb 21, 2014 - 12:58pm PT
There was one element of the option B model I forgot to mention;if a climber employs constructive scarring effectively on a new route and then does a "confirmation", that is; pulling the rope and releading the pitch without a hammer, then no impact fees for pin use are assessed.

This encourages the creation of clean routes, and discourages blasting out placements.

This whole thread was created so Ron could stroke his short man little ego.

Look at me...look at me...

Snore.
crunch

Social climber
CO
Feb 21, 2014 - 01:05pm PT
It goes back a lot farther than 46 years crunch.

What about Donald Orcutt? The Crawford cousins on the Steamboat? Glen Dawson? Fritz Weisner?

Doh, sometimes my blatherings about history are paddlefooted flails. Sorry.

I'll go sit in a corner for a while.

Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 21, 2014 - 01:34pm PT
Sorry Steve.

Joshua, your harping on my stature is a complement. For a number of years people who had never met me figured I was 6'+.
Keep it up. It reflects well of you.
the albatross

Gym climber
Flagstaff
Mar 16, 2014 - 06:04pm PT
It would appear that the Access Fund does indeed have the guts to preserve desert routes.

Ron, I understand you are specifically talking about degradation of the features and protection on sandstone routes, particularly on the Colorado Plateau. This link to the activities is in regards to Christmas Tree Pass, an area where the NPS is seeking to actually remove all climber placed anchors.

Bolt removal proposal at Christmas Tree Pass:
http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=2362839&msg=2365114#msg2365114

Less than a week left to comment on this proposal.
the albatross

Gym climber
Flagstaff
Mar 27, 2014 - 06:19pm PT
Here's a few pics from Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.

http://www.papillon.com/lake-powell-page/lake-powell-page-tours/top-of-the-world-at-tower-butte

I did not take this photo.  Helo coming up on Tower Butte.
I did not take this photo. Helo coming up on Tower Butte.
Credit: the albatross

Not my photo.  Helicopter on the summit of Tower Butte.
Not my photo. Helicopter on the summit of Tower Butte.
Credit: the albatross

Tower Butte &#40;not my photo&#41;
Tower Butte (not my photo)
Credit: the albatross


Legend has it that a couple of bandits climbed up this beast some three decades ago and found plywood up on top, from some sort of helicopter photo shoot.
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