Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 581 - 600 of total 1004 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Potemkin Village
Sep 5, 2013 - 11:23am PT
Referendum by social media is changing everything.

Billions taking part in the back n forth. Everywhere. Amazing phenomenon.

Once again, we are seeing history being made. At a frenzy. In our own lifetimes.

Now I think even if Obama is given his mandate to shoot, I don't think he will. The tides are just too strong every which way and uncertain.

Exciting times.

.....

A truly exciting idea is that this social media phenomenon (that we've all been blessed to witness evolve) just might - more than any other factor EVER - lead to the eventual development of ONE world government. Esp as it matures, comes of age, gains maturity. It's going to have ever more influence - as it evolves - on global standards (including behavioral, governmental, environmental, commercial, cultural and supercultural).

In a way, it's a real bummer future generations aren't going to have the same easy access to fossil fuels like our generations did.

100 years from now (let alone 500 years from now) - brave new world indeed!
WBraun

climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 12:52pm PT
HFCS -- "Exciting times"

Endless wars, mass killings, endless disasters, endless genocides, man made virus to kill populations, gas people, etc etc.

Stupid Americans think all that is so exciting ......
jghedge

climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 01:04pm PT


Al-Qaeda’s Proxies Among Syria’s Rebels Scared by Threat of U.S. Strikes

http://world.time.com/2013/09/05/al-qaedas-proxies-among-syrias-rebels-scared-by-threat-of-u-s-strikes/#ixzz2e3C2CejN


As the U.S. Congress inches closer towards authorizing the use of military force in Syria, rebel groups on the ground are preparing for an offensive that could fundamentally alter the trajectory of what is now a stalemated war well into its third year. Not all of them are happy about it: al-Qaeda affiliated groups that have long sided with the rebels are worried that the U.S. and its allies might use the pretext of strikes against the regime to degrade their own abilities. According to Ayham Al Hussain, a rebel fighter from the northern city of Raqaa, which was taken over by the al-Qaeda affiliated Nusra Front in March, the jihadist groups have left their bases and melted into civilian society, fearing a U.S. strike. “The Islamists are so afraid,” he says, using a term that encompasses the Nusra Front as well as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, Syria’s al-Qaeda wing. “They have evacuated their positions but are still keeping some of the guards in front of their bases,” he says via Skype, noting that they have even taken down their signature black flags.

A strike on Syria’s al-Qaeda affiliates is highly unlikely—such a strategy would be difficult to pull off given the complex interlacing of various rebel groups, and nothing of the sort has been publicly discussed as officials in the Administration of U.S. President Barack Obama make their case for punitive attacks against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, whom they accuse of launching a chemical weapons attack against rebel-held suburbs east of Damascus on August 21. (The government denies using chemical weapons, saying the opposition is responsible.) But opposition concerns about the pending attacks expose the growing rift between al-Qaeda-aligned rebel groups whose ultimate goal is an Islamic state in Syria and the more moderate factions who are simply fighting to overthrow the Assad regime.

The jihadist groups, by dint of their discipline, religious zeal and the inclusion of foreign combatants trained in the wars of Iraq, Afghanistan and Chechnya, tend to be the most effective fighters. They have garnered a disproportionate degree of influence for that reason, and attract attention, funding and weapons from international donors seeking a quick path to the overthrow of Assad. The more moderate Syrian rebels are conflicted; while they welcome the jihadist groups’ military prowess, they fear the militants won’t stop with Assad’s overthrow. “The Islamists are not fighting for us, they are fighting for their own agendas,” complains Mohammad Mohammad, a 25 year-old rebel fighter from Rankous, near Damascus, via Skype. “They repaint our graffiti with Islamic paintings and they want to solve our problems in Islamic courts. I want a national and civil court.”

Opposition activists worry that the growing power of the al-Qaeda-affiliated groups in areas they control could cause a backlash, tarring all the rebels with the jihadist brush and driving Syrians back into the regime’s arms. Some have gone so far as to vocalize their hopes that the U.S. might take out their al-Qaeda rivals at the same time as Assad’s military assets. “Both the regime and the fanatic groups are delaying our victory and our freedoms,” says Husam Rozisk, an opposition activist running the Tal Abyad Media Center in Aleppo. “To target both now is better than leaving [the jihadists] to have a bigger influence because it will be hard to eliminate them in the future.”

Even if such an attack is unlikely, some of the hard core jihadist groups are taking cover, just in case. “We cannot hide that we are anxious, but we are well prepared. We have evacuated all of our bases,” says Abu Omar al-Tawammi, an Aleppo-based commander from the Salafist Ahrar ash-Sham brigade, one of the most powerful factions fighting in the war, with 10,000 to 20,000 fighters. Along with the Nusra Front, Ahrar ash-Sham has been designated a terrorist organization by the United States, which may explain some of the paranoia. “They [the Americans] declared that the aim of the strike is to punish the regime but the real aim behind the strike is to weaken the Islamic groups on behalf of the FSA,” he tells TIME via Skype, referring to the Western backed Free Syrian Army, a loose confederation of rebel units also fighting the regime.

Mohammad, the fighter from Rankous, dismisses such fears as propaganda designed to elicit support from a population that already feels betrayed by the West for its inaction. In the wake of the chemical attacks, the jihadist groups took the lead in calling for retribution, threatening a “volcano of revenge” against the government. U.S. attacks could preempt the jihadists’ standing as the toughest kids on the block, undermining support from a population that was willing to put up with Islamic law in exchange for a strong champion against the regime. “In my area the Islamists haven’t left their bases yet but they are spreading rumors that they will be attacked to make people sympathies with them,” says Mohammad. To Reva Bhalla, Vice President of Global Analysis for Stratfor, a private intelligence and analysis organization based in Texas, the jihadist groups’ reaction may be a canny combination of defensive positioning and p.r. broadcasting. “If they can’t be sure of U.S. intentions on the whole, there may be some practicality to reducing their profile. It works in their favor to assume the role of both victim and avenger,” she says.

Such tactics may work in the short term, says Mohammad. But they won’t last. “The Islamists are defying the will of the Syrian people and they will lose by the end.” It’s just not clear how long that will take.



JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Sep 5, 2013 - 01:57pm PT
Not that anybody asked, but a traditional bomb is an explosive concentration of unstable chemicals.

Indeed, HFCS. It reminds me of a time when our sister-in-law mentioned that she didn't want any chemicals on or in her food, as she was sprinkling salt on her meal.

John
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Sep 5, 2013 - 02:22pm PT
It's a limited tactical strike, and it has to be done.

Well, as long as we kill innocent people in order to protect innocent people from being killed, it's cool.

"Open your eyes, Clevinger. It doesn't make a damned bit of difference who wins the war to someone who's dead."

...

Clevinger was dead. That was the basic flaw in his philosophy.
GhoulweJ

Trad climber
El Dorado Hills, CA
Sep 5, 2013 - 02:23pm PT
JGHEDGE.... Yawn
Hawkeye

climber
State of Mine
Sep 5, 2013 - 02:24pm PT
Ever looked at a map? Jerusalem is as close to where those 400 kids were gassed to death (Damascus) as Vegas is to LA (about 300 miles).

Ever looked at the Chemical Weapons Convention? Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons?

Israel is one of those who has NOT ratified the treaty.

http://www.opcw.org/about-opcw/non-member-states/

plus they are "thought to have OFFEENSIVE capabilities (perhaps more offensive than yours joe :) )

Israel has signed but not ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC).[14] There are speculations that a chemical weapons program might be located at the Israel Institute for Biological Research (IIBR[15]) in Ness Ziona.[16]

190 liters of dimethyl methylphosphonate, a CWC schedule 2 chemical used in the synthesis of sarin nerve gas, was discovered in the cargo of El Al Flight 1862 after it crashed in 1992 en route to Tel Aviv. Israel insisted the material was non-toxic, was to have been used to test filters that protect against chemical weapons, and that it had been clearly listed on the cargo manifest in accordance with international regulations. The shipment was from a U.S. chemical plant to the IIBR under a U.S. Department of Commerce license.[17]

In 1993, the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment WMD proliferation assessment recorded Israel as a country generally reported as having undeclared offensive chemical warfare capabilities.[2] Former US deputy assistant secretary of defense responsible for chemical and biological defense, Bill Richardson, said in 1998 "I have no doubt that Israel has worked on both chemical and biological offensive things for a long time... There's no doubt they've had stuff for years."[18]

http://www.opcw.org/about-opcw/non-member-states/
Hawkeye

climber
State of Mine
Sep 5, 2013 - 02:26pm PT
dont you guys ever get worried about the sales job going in from the current administration???

doesnt that ring some alarm bells from when shrub was in office prior to invading iraq?
WBraun

climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 02:43pm PT
The Hedge/Norton types are way too stupid to understand this stuff.

They also don't know how to use the internet.

They just skim the top MSM sites for their stupid censored news and believe all that stupid worthless bias and censored drivel.

Then regurgitate it here bullying everyone to follow their stupid drool along with their maniacal stupid laugh.

Proves they are brainwashed zombies.

And these morons are running our world today holding all the buttons.

Unbelievably stupid people ......

fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Sep 5, 2013 - 03:23pm PT
I'm going to go out on a limb and say that I don't believe Hedge is all that stupid. Just incapable of critical thinking. I work with plenty of very educated intelligent people with a similiar affliction. Engineers, lawyers, some doctors. All faithfully glued to the same corporate newsfeeds.

The tides are changing though.... bit by bit more seem to be rejecting the obvious MSM drivel. The powers that be seem more desperate now, cracks in the curtain are visible to anyone now with access to the Internet.

So rather than name calling I choose to continue to try and educate. Maybe even one day Hedge will wake up!
sandstone conglomerate

climber
sharon conglomerate central
Sep 5, 2013 - 03:33pm PT
Tomahawk cruise missiles are much more humane than sarin gas. So are bullets, mortars, knives, power drills, fire, hand grenades, baseball bats, or rocks. Killing with those is acceptable, ask any bullet-riddled, de-limbed corpse.
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 03:49pm PT
The tides are changing though.... bit by bit more seem to be rejecting the obvious MSM drivel. The powers that be seem more desperate now, cracks in the curtain are visible to anyone now with access to the Internet.

Very astute observation.
The main difference between the left and the right at this moment is that the Right now knows its social and political values may be passé. ( their current nightmares now include Miley Cyrus)
The Left has yet to discover the same is true of their own.

In fact, in the not too distant future the political ideology that more fully embraces international capitalism and technology and rejects the bungling centralized control of Washington political/ media elites, will probably win the future.
The left is too mired in the anachronistic Socialistic Baby boomer politics of the 60s, and the right is too fractured , leaderless, and stupid.

New political alignments will emerge, more reflective of the current realities ,and probably no doubt hastened along by human made disaster, like a worldwide depression or large scale war.
jghedge

climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 04:07pm PT


"Israel is one of those who has NOT ratified the treaty."

You and Werner are the kings of coming up with points that are either irrelevant, non-sequitur, or so far off base that no one really knows how to respond
jghedge

climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 04:09pm PT

"So rather than name calling I choose to continue to try and educate. Maybe even one day Hedge will wake up!"


You're educating? Hahahahaha

Your version of education is to tune reality out and believe whatever you want.

Have fun.
WBraun

climber
Sep 5, 2013 - 04:13pm PT
You don't know Joe because you don't fuking have a clue what's really going on.

It's just you and your regurgitated MSM garbage which is totally useless.

But that's what you use, bully and push it onto people here with your self rubber stamped authority.

Go kiss Nutyahoo's stupid ass some more ......
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Sep 5, 2013 - 05:04pm PT
a very astute observation about...

Very astute observation.
The main difference between the left and the right at this moment is that the Right now knows its social and political values may be passé. ( their current nightmares now include Miley Cyrus)
The Left has yet to discover the same is true of their own.

In fact, in the not too distant future the political ideology that more fully embraces international capitalism and technology and rejects the bungling centralized control of Washington political/ media elites, will probably win the future.
The left is too mired in the anachronistic Socialistic Baby boomer politics of the 60s, and the right is too fractured , leaderless, and stupid.

New political alignments will emerge, more reflective of the current realities ,and probably no doubt hastened along by human made disaster, like a worldwide depression or large scale war.

oh yeah, and this
Credit: Wade Icey
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Sep 5, 2013 - 05:18pm PT
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/syria/10289944/Syria-crisis-al-Qaeda-seizes-village-that-still-speaks-the-ancient-language-of-Christ.html
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Sep 5, 2013 - 05:31pm PT
http://sofrep.com/26604/bandar-bin-sultan-and-the-house-of-sauds-hand-in-syria/
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 5, 2013 - 05:50pm PT
WASHINGTON—As President Obama continues to push for a plan of limited military intervention in Syria, a new poll of Americans has found that though the nation remains wary over the prospect of becoming involved in another Middle Eastern war, the vast majority of U.S. citizens strongly approve of sending Congress to Syria.

The New York Times/CBS News poll showed that though just 1 in 4 Americans believe that the United States has a responsibility to intervene in the Syrian conflict, more than 90 percent of the public is convinced that putting all 535 representatives of the United States Congress on the ground in Syria—including Senate pro tempore Patrick Leahy, House Speaker John Boehner, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and, in fact, all current members of the House and Senate—is the best course of action at this time.

“I believe it is in the best interest of the United States, and the global community as a whole, to move forward with the deployment of all U.S. congressional leaders to Syria immediately,” respondent Carol Abare, 50, said in the nationwide telephone survey, echoing the thoughts of an estimated 9 in 10 Americans who said they “strongly support” any plan of action that involves putting the U.S. House and Senate on the ground in the war-torn Middle Eastern state. “With violence intensifying every day, now is absolutely the right moment—the perfect moment, really—for the United States to send our legislators to the region.”

“In fact, my preference would have been for Congress to be deployed months ago,” she added.

Citing overwhelming support from the international community—including that of the Arab League, Turkey, and France, as well as Great Britain, Iraq, Iran, Russia, Japan, Mexico, China, and Canada, all of whom are reported to be unilaterally in favor of sending the U.S. Congress to Syria—the majority of survey respondents said they believe the United States should refocus its entire approach to Syria’s civil war on the ground deployment of U.S. senators and representatives, regardless of whether the Assad regime used chemical weapons or not.

In fact, 91 percent of those surveyed agreed that the active use of sarin gas attacks by the Syrian government would, if anything, only increase poll respondents’ desire to send Congress to Syria.

Public opinion was essentially unchanged when survey respondents were asked about a broader range of attacks, with more than 79 percent of Americans saying they would strongly support sending Congress to Syria in cases of bomb and missile attacks, 78 percent supporting intervention in cases of kidnappings and executions, and 75 percent saying representatives should be deployed in cases where government forces were found to have used torture.

When asked if they believe that Sen. Rand Paul should be deployed to Syria, 100 percent of respondents said yes.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that sending Congress to Syria—or, at the very least, sending the major congressional leaders in both parties—is the correct course of action,” survey respondent and Iraq war veteran Maj. Gen. John Mill said, noting that his opinion was informed by four tours of duty in which he saw dozens of close friends sustain physical as well as emotional injury and post-traumatic stress. “There is a clear solution to our problems staring us right in the face here, and we need to take action.”

“Sooner rather than later, too,” Mill added. “This war isn’t going to last forever.”


The Onion
Dave Kos

Social climber
Temecula
Sep 5, 2013 - 05:59pm PT
dont you guys ever get worried about the sales job going in from the current administration???

doesnt that ring some alarm bells from when shrub was in office prior to invading iraq?

Not really.

Bush was looking for an excuse for full-scale invasion. He saw the "war on terror" as an opportunity to lead the US in some grand historic war that would eliminate an "evil."

He actually believed that "the terrorists" could be defeated just like the Nazis.

Obama is just trying to enforce a principle at best, or trying to save some face at worst.

I don't think getting involved is a good idea from a pragmatic viewpoint, but I think the risks are low. We'll blow a few hundred million dollars on a fireworks show, and that will likely be the end of our direct role in this mess.


Messages 581 - 600 of total 1004 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews