Influence and importance of Dub Reggae in modern music

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Casey Bald

climber
lower refuse, NH
Topic Author's Original Post - Jul 11, 2013 - 12:41am PT
Just thinking today while at work how important Dub is in the lineage of modern music......even found an excellent doc on the subject...

http://youtu.be/VGIqnGEcCbo

anyone out there have some Reggae or Dub favorites they would like to share?
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 11, 2013 - 12:50am PT


This guy is my all time favorite Dub artist. A true pioneer. Augustus Pablo. This might be his best work.
Casey Bald

climber
lower refuse, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 11, 2013 - 12:57am PT
One of my very best friends plays the melodica, a truly amazing and versatile instrument. I dont know of anyone who played it quite like pablo did.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 11, 2013 - 01:05am PT
Selassie I Dub is my favorite track. Irations from the Most High.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 11, 2013 - 01:17am PT


King Tubby, Scientist, and Prince Jammy:

Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 11, 2013 - 01:27am PT
More Pablo:



Not really dub but a sweet tune.
AndyR

Social climber
Back of Beyond
Jul 11, 2013 - 02:30am PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vu97ctxg8hk
Roots

Mountain climber
SoCal
Jul 11, 2013 - 11:04am PT
Reggae in general transcends to most modern music. Take Rap for instance - born from early toasters. But to the Roots of it all there was no question of the importance of SKA.

JAH bless
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Jul 11, 2013 - 11:54am PT
Hey Casey, are you Johns kid?
darkmagus

Mountain climber
San Diego, CA
Jul 11, 2013 - 12:11pm PT




AndyR

Social climber
Back of Beyond
Jul 11, 2013 - 11:04pm PT
One of the greatest lyricists of his time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykU4T7lPna4
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jul 11, 2013 - 11:20pm PT
Ever see this box set?

The Story of Jamaican Music

The University of Reno used to have an awesome Sunday radio show on Jamaican music that you could pick up in the Buttermilks.... Anyone know if that show is still happening?
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 12, 2013 - 01:42am PT
Or before Dub



youtube is funny: I go to listen to the above and advertising to me in the side bar is:

Bargainhunter

climber
Jul 12, 2013 - 05:38am PT
Thanks for posting the documentary, Casey. It looks amazing.

I discovered reggae in my early teen years and was immediately drawn more to dub than reggae proper. My first pure dub album was by Black Uhuru. At night while lying in bed in NYC, I would listen to the Gil Bailey show on WBAI in the early 1980s and expand my horizons. Little did I know that much of the pop music that I listened to in junior high school owed a lot to the influence of reggae. For example, the Police's song "Walking on the Moon" is a clear example.

Fiendish trips to the Tower Records on lower Broadway in 10th grade rewarded me with LP obscurities from Scientist, Clint Eastwood and General Saint’s “Two Bad DJ”, etc. and dancehall toasters such as Yellowman. Most intriguing were off label presses from the West Indies that had no graphics, offshoots of King Tubby, Lee Perry, and other greats, all with low tech effects- reverb, echo, and heavy bass tracks.

In the mid 1990s, continuing my quest for obscure dub music, I discovered a dual CD called "Planet Dub" that was a compilation of modern dub using electronica, with tracks by various artist like 100th Monkey, Alien Progeny, Alpha and Omega, Astralasia and more. This is still an amazing compilation that serves as a transition to more modern dub off shoots, namely modern dubstep and other dub influenced electronica.

It was cool for me to discover more recently in the past few years re-emerging interest in dub (for example The Bug’s “Poison Dart”) and even roots reggae bands like 10 Ft Ganja Plant. Listen to their “Walky Walk Tall” and you would not believe it’s a bunch of white guys from upstate New York. Unbelievable!

More mainstream surfer/stoner SoCal rock bands like Sublime and their offshoots like Slightly Stoopid’s “This Joint” continue the tradition. Theivery Corporation's "Amerimaka" is another example.

Please keep the bass chalice overflowing….
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jul 12, 2013 - 09:15am PT
If only it hadn't inspired dub step....
weezy

climber
Jul 12, 2013 - 11:23am PT
If only it hadn't inspired dub step....

it didn't. the weobwobwobstep producers simply appropriated the name from original dubstep which came out of the jungle/UK two-step scene. this is why dubstep fans get so pissed when the tag gets applied to the wobstep garbage you hear on every damn mountain bike or ski/board video. if i hear that "cracks begin to show" remix again i'm going to jab a pencil in both ears.


that documentary was really nice. i just watched another one called NY77 which is about the rise of punk and hiphop culture in new york in 1977. it makes a nice complement to Dub Echoes since it goes into the street/block parties of the era which were basically the same thing as the soundsystem scene in jamaica.

check it out: https://vimeo.com/34429641
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Jul 12, 2013 - 11:33am PT
I'd say dub hasn't been too influential in the grand scheme of things, but thanks for the neuron bump. Here's a good old one "Who Killed the Chicken?"
Bargainhunter

climber
Jul 12, 2013 - 11:40pm PT
So the documentary hinted at this, but did ska originate from punk rockers digging reggae and dub and incorporating it into their faster tempo?

It was amusing to hear one of the narrators in the film mention casually that he used to sell weed to Bob Marley.
weezy

climber
Jul 13, 2013 - 12:25pm PT
pretty sure ska came way before punk rock. a lot of bob marley's early pre-dreads stuff was very ska-like. i think ska became popular when the groups like The Specials, et al popped up.
Casey Bald

climber
lower refuse, NH
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2013 - 09:44pm PT
T Hocking, No Im not john's son but I believe John is a distant relative fam of mine, not many Bald's in the world.

Weezy is dead right in saying that dub didnt really influence dub step, most dubstep comes from sped up versions of uk garage with huge low end wobble effects.
tradryan

Big Wall climber
San Diego
Aug 18, 2013 - 11:21pm PT
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CoLfkrLDeGg]
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Aug 18, 2013 - 11:42pm PT
zero.
MisterE

climber
Aug 19, 2013 - 12:33am PT
Glad to see Lee Perry mentioned.

The Marley documentary is really excellent for some history of the beginnings.
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Aug 19, 2013 - 01:11pm PT
So the documentary hinted at this, but did ska originate from punk rockers digging reggae and dub and incorporating it into their faster tempo?


Bad Brains
Ozpaco

Social climber
North Bay, CA
Aug 19, 2013 - 04:47pm PT
I remember listening to ska in the 60s, but it's older than that, like from the 50s
john bald

climber
Aug 19, 2013 - 07:30pm PT
Hey Casey,
Good to see another Bald climber...so many of them in my age group.
My son, Anthony, is a Bay Area teacher/musician. He did a stint in a Ska band....I have an appreciation for the old stuff like Toots. Rained out on my trip to the Dacks this summer..try again next year.
Tad...hope to run into you on our annual trip to Redding.
Timid TopRope

Social climber
'used to be Paradise, CA
Aug 19, 2013 - 07:47pm PT
Always dug the Augustus Pablo dub style and fortunate to see Lee Scratch Perry in Chico a couple of years ago. He is still a freaky dude.
Just wanted to give a shout out to all the good things Adrian Sherwood has produced. Here's a sampler of some of his stuff.




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