Somebody save Canmore!

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Messages 61 - 80 of total 91 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Jun 21, 2013 - 11:41pm PT
I love choss and have climbed a lot of it including 100s of days in the Canadian Rockies.
Even I am blown away by how loose some classic Rockies routes can be.
It's not loose rocks - on some routes every rock is loose and ya try to find rocks that are only a little loose. Very zen like climbing .
Pick up the scrambles book and try to bag summits in different areas.
Mount Louis is a great mountain but not a scramble .
The long bolted routes are great and the cragging is great as well.
Many lifetimes of unreal fun.
Compared to Yosemite climbing it's sort of unrecognizable as the same sport.


Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jun 21, 2013 - 11:46pm PT
nah000,

This never would have happened if Ralph Klein was still alive...
kunlun_shan

Mountain climber
SF, CA
Jun 21, 2013 - 11:49pm PT
View of the flood this morning from a Calgary police helicopter. It's an hour long, so covers lots of area.

Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jun 22, 2013 - 12:01am PT
^^^Holy crap....I hope your folks are OK kunlun_shan, further west if I remember and hopefully on higher ground.
kunlun_shan

Mountain climber
SF, CA
Jun 22, 2013 - 12:04am PT
Hey Charlie, they are quite alright in the Shuswap. It has been raining, but not like in Alberta.
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Jun 22, 2013 - 12:05am PT
That looks devastating. Looks like a beautiful city, I hope things settle down up there.
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Jun 22, 2013 - 12:45am PT
As said up thread, Holy Crap!

That is an amazing show of force by mother nature.

My thoughts go out to people affected and hope the casualties are few.

Rip

Trad climber
Norman, OK
Jun 22, 2013 - 01:29am PT
I've been in Canmore since the flood started and traveled around today assessing the damage. According to the authorities, the river has crested in Banff and will crest in Canmore tonight. Central Canmore has some minor flooding (basements and low lying areas) but for the most part will escape major damage. Things are actually looking better tonight, as the worst is over here. The Cougar Creek flood, however, has caused the most damage with multiple exposed house foundations, and then heavily damaged Highway 1 below. Fortunately, no houses along Cougar Creek actually fell into the flood waters, but many look to be beyond saving.

Highway 1 is closed from Canmore to Calgary due to several damaged bridges, and closed from Canmore to Banff due to damage at the Carrot Creek bridge. But the most damage appears to be at the place where Cougar Creek intersects highway 1, both the West and Eastbound lanes. That means, at least for the time-being, no one can leave Canmore in either direction. But the authorities are allowing food trucks to enter the area.

The Canmore town web site is a great place to get updates.
nah000

climber
canuckistan
Jun 22, 2013 - 02:14am PT
AP: i was once told that the some of the major early flooding [ the three largest events on record were in 1879, 1897 and 1902 ] along with being prior to the building of the downstream dams, were at least in part coincident with major forest fires in the foothills that wiped out much of the soils ability to as successfully absorb moisture. i've been trying to find something authoritative that makes and backs up this claim, but so far no luck. so who knows it could be just a nice myth.

what i did find in looking, that i found interesting was this quote from "The River Returns: An Environmental History of the Bow":

"High monthly rainfall was not in itself sufficient to cause a flood. What seemed to matter most was the degree of saturation of the ground by previous storms and the concentration of subsequent rainfall in a short period. Monthly rains totalling more than 9 inches in 1899, 1927, and 1954, for example, did not result in floods. The years of notable floods - 1915, 1929, and 1932 - recorded only 4 inches of rain or less in a month. It was the distribution of that rain that made all the difference."

the above would seem to pretty much sum up this event in 2013... it's not just about how much rain but about how much, how fast and how soon after a previous rain that had already created ground saturation in the mountains, and foot hills...


Jim Brennan: i may be dense, haha, but i don't think i follow... if you're making a joke about klein's vs nenshi's competence in handling a complex set of fluid events like this one i wouldn't disagree even though i wasn't around for klein's tenure. nenshi and his administration's handling so far has been nothing short of exemplary from my perspective. he and his team keep the public informed with quality and transparent info, and the whole bureaucratic structure handled the evacuations having very little notice themselves, and still remained incredibly effective and efficient. so far, so impressive...

Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jun 22, 2013 - 02:25am PT
I was truly joking. It always gives me a laugh when puny humans think they can do... anything in the face of what the planet dishes out. So far there are no reports of people dying due to the floods and this is good news.
nah000

climber
canuckistan
Jun 22, 2013 - 02:41am PT
JB: aahh, i was reading into it way too hard - haha. i couldn't agree more with what you were really saying ... like the mountains, these large scale natural events are a reminder of how small we ultimately are ... individually and even collectively.
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2013 - 02:51am PT
"It is disgusting how little press this has received. "

Yeah, WTF is that about?
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Jun 22, 2013 - 08:40am PT
At the risk of being pegged a Global Warming Alarmist, there may be a link here....

Stalled high pressure system -- a ‘firehose of moisture’ -- caused floods in Calgary


EDMONTON - A massive high pressure system held in place by a loop in the jet stream is what’s behind both the Calgary floods and balmy temperatures in the Yukon.

“It doesn’t let systems through,” said Chris Scott, chief meteorologist at the Weather Network. He watched as what would otherwise be just a simple spring storm got stuck west of Calgary.

The weather system came over the mountains from the Pacific. As it spun and stalled over the foothills, it pulled in moisture from Saskatchewan, the United States and the Gulf of Mexico. Starting Wednesday around suppertime, it poured for 15 to 18 hours straight across most of southwest Alberta.

“It was like this firehose of moisture,” Scott said. “(The weather system) just kept slamming this moisture into the mountains.”

One spot at the Three Sisters Dam in Kananaskis got 220 millimetres of water in 36 hours, which is “nearly half of the total annual precipitation for that area.”

Many areas got as much rain in 18 hours as they normally get in two months. Locations from Waterton Lakes National Park north were measuring near 100 mm, and some got as high as 120 or 150 mm. Bow Valley, west of Calgary on Highway 1, got 165 mm.



Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/technology/Firehose+moisture+caused+floods+Calgary/8561123/story.html#ixzz2Wwlqi4EL



The "Jet stream loop " mentioned is a recent phenomena that has been observed world wide and appears to be responsible for "persistent" weather patterns, such as the European wet and cold spring or the SW drought. I'm sure the link of this pattern to AGW is still not conclusively understood but AGW is well understood to be the dominant forcing mechanism influencing the current climate change.

If it is linked - as is a reasonable suspicion by anyones guess - it is not a good trend.

That was an upslope like few others. You don't want that sort of thing to happen often.


I just heard about 3 confirmed fatalities. Things were looking super lucky for a while there but I guess its a good thing its only 3 so far. Really sad to hear


Any news about the folks at Johnsons Landing down at Kootenay lake? There was a similar persistent wet period that set them up last year and I understand there is still plenty more potential.
wbw

Trad climber
'cross the great divide
Jun 22, 2013 - 09:42am PT
Such a sad situation; such a special part of the world. Positive vibes to all folks affected by this tragedy.

Just out of curiosity: I've been dealing with the topic of flood insurance and the soon-to-be-changing flood maps for the city of Boulder. The so-called 100 year flood plain will be greatly expanded along some drainages that seem to be pretty obscure (and absolutely dry except in rare heavy downpours). Bruce, this may be tangentially related to your comments about climate change.

Anyway, how much does the government up there in Alberta, and mortgage companies impose flood insurance on homes located in flood plains in Canada? I purchased flood insurance last week on my house in Boulder for the first time in 16 years, so that I can get grandfathered in at a more affordable rate once the maps change. Good thing is that the city of Boulder has given residents a heads up so that one can be proactive. Bad thing is that the mortgage companies force one to buy flood insurance that has become much more expensive since the devastating Mississippi River floods of several years ago.

Again, best hopes and thoughts to all of you in Alberta.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 22, 2013 - 10:08am PT
Drudge has it up

Looks like there have been some fatalities.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/story/2013/06/21/alberta-flooding-calgary-canmore-high-water.html
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Jun 22, 2013 - 10:22am PT
wbw - I'm covered for flood with no rider - standard policy. If I want earthquake coverage I gotta pay a bit more, which I'm thinking about at least.....

I live right next door to a 15 foot high dyke at the confluence of two big rivers. We had a 100 year flood just a few years ago that came within a couple of feet of breaching.
WTF

climber
Jun 22, 2013 - 10:56am PT
Yeah, WTF is that about?

Well since you asked I suspect its about the fact that unlike here in Amerika the Canadians don't need to spray their flood problems all over the TV and radio. They know there is a flood they know there is very little they can do to stop it and they are just waiting for the rain to stop.

The rivers will go down they will clean up and they will carry on. Unlike here when this type of event occurs we panic we go on TV we cry we obsess about losing property and our stuff. In Canada it's just stfu and deal.

Riley hope your family is ok and to all my Canadian friends best wishes.

Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Jun 22, 2013 - 11:04am PT
Speaking of Canadians, I'll bet there's no looting and rioting after the floods either.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Jun 22, 2013 - 11:16am PT
No Jan. All Canadian teams are out of the playoffs ages ago so there is really nothing to riot about.


This is cool. This guys said these words a couple of weeks ago:

John Pomeroy, the Canada research chair in Water Resources and Climate Change at the University of Saskatchewan, has studied rainfall records on the Prairies for the past century and found a marked increase in the number of multi-day rain events during the summer that can overwhelm streams and rivers.

“Those big frontal systems are increasing in their intensity and frequency,” said Pomeroy, “and we’re fast learning that our roads, our bridges and even some of our towns aren’t any match for the rainfall and the overflow that results.”



Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/alberta/Alberta+urged+prepare+increasingly+severe+weather+insurance+losses+mount/8446756/story.html#ixzz2WxTLxeZV


He also deliberately lives up on a hill side.... above the flood plain
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jun 22, 2013 - 12:33pm PT
RC drone's eye view:

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