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Messages 101 - 118 of total 118 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
May 1, 2013 - 10:44pm PT
Cragchick...Skirt...? Sorry , i didn't know...? Kilt...? My friend was pregnant with stones and when we skied at night he would piss blood...Ouch...
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 10:46pm PT
Yeah, I've learned that pissing blood is WAY overrated.
T H

Social climber
May 1, 2013 - 10:50pm PT
I'd go the other direction to Reno instead of Mammoth (hospital) if I was you. ; )
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 10:52pm PT
You aren't the first one to tell me that today, Biotch.
portent

climber
May 1, 2013 - 10:59pm PT
RJ,

I for sure felt like a little bitch crying on the floor of that hospital.

Sh#t sucks.

Hats off to the High Desert Medical Center though. They were all top notch and I appreciate their patience, humor and compassion. I must have been a handful.

edit: I didn't feel mine pass but after kidney to bladder, I can't imagine worse...

--kovar


Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 11:02pm PT
The pain of those things is surreal.

Flanders watched for 2 hours as I writhed on the floor, unable to speak, head banging against the wall....with my face contorted to something that would have made Stephen King reach for a pen.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
May 1, 2013 - 11:07pm PT
According to the Wikipedia, about 80% of those with kidney stones are men. Men most commonly experience their first episode between 20-30 years of age, while for women the age at first presentation is somewhat later.

Dietary factors that increase the risk of stone formation include low fluid intake and high dietary intake of animal protein, sodium, refined sugars, fructose and high fructose corn syrup, oxalate, grapefruit juice, apple juice, and cola drinks.

......current evidence suggests the consumption of diets low in calcium is associated with a higher overall risk for the development of kidney stones.For most individuals, other risk factors for kidney stones, such as high intakes of dietary oxalates and low fluid intake, would play a greater role than calcium intake.

Some stones are composed of uric acid, common to men with gout. Since gout is sex linked, women don' get it normally. That could in part account for the higher incidence of stones with men.

Sorry guys, I had no idea they were this common.
portent

climber
May 1, 2013 - 11:17pm PT
According to the Wikipedia, about 80% of those with kidney stones are men.

yeah, must have been the dilaudid, had me thinking crazy. I remember my dad having them. My brother's had them too.
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 1, 2013 - 11:19pm PT
My Dad had 'em.....cola was his culprit. I quit that stuff 10 years ago.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 2, 2013 - 01:10am PT
That does it, I'm not going off the beer. It's gotta be what's kept me pure
lo these many years, right? I wonder if Frenchmen get more stones than Germans?
Michelle Gill

climber
Redding, CA
May 5, 2013 - 12:30am PT
Man, it sounds as though you have been through a terrible experience! I hope the worst of it is over and that you are on the downhill side. Good luck to you.
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
May 5, 2013 - 01:26am PT
Sorry for the terrible experience.

The state of the art for stones has changed. For an attack, the best current treatment is not narcotic pain meds, but a drug called Toradol, given by injection (oral doesn't work). For most people, it works miraculously in about 15 min. The effect may be quite long lasting, as well, and a person may feel no more pain until it passes out of the body.

Toradol is related to ibuprofen, but is the only one that is injected. It is not as strong as narcotics, but it's potent anti-inflammatory effects appear to relax the ureter (the tube in which the stone is stuck). It is actually the spasm of the ureter that causes the pain.

For some, narcotics work poorly. For some, one works better than another, and it is unpredictable. However, for all, the narcotics wear off in a few hours, and the problem is not fixed.

The hot new thing the last few years for treatment after the initial pain is relieved, is Medical Expulsive Therapy, which is the use of drugs to assist the body in pushing the stone out.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17681643

It depends upon the size of the stone, but this approach can move the stone in from 30% to 75% of patients.

The most common drug used is generic Flomax, although there are others.

Prevention of recurrent stones is most efficiently done by drinking more water. There are a variety of other things, but water is the most effective.
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
May 5, 2013 - 02:29am PT
Dean...All i know is if i were in anything close to the type of pain you are describing .. I'd get me some morphine.. f*#k it .. load me up and wake me up when it's over. Or maybe that Toradol that ken mention plus morphine.
madbolter1

Big Wall climber
Denver, CO
May 5, 2013 - 04:09am PT
Puking on the hospital floor, sniveling like a newborn babe, including the wailing.

After morphine (God bless poppies!), I apologized to the nurse for all my carrying on.

She said, "Nothing to apologize for. I've had three kids and one kidney stone. I would give birth to the three kids one after the other instead of having another kidney stone."

The level of pain is beyond description to those that have not experienced it. It's like you become pain itself.

The amazing thing about morphine (in my experience) is that it doesn't take the pain away. It's like you still know the pain is there. But in some weird way, it's no longer YOUR pain. It's like you can say, "There is pain," but it's not "attached" to you; like it's no longer troubling you. It's "distant." At least that's what the experience was like for me.

I hope you've gotten passed it by now! (lame pun intended)
Anastasia

climber
Home
May 5, 2013 - 04:55am PT
Yes, and it was a little bitty tiny stone. I thought I was dying, I was curled up in the fetal position for a full 18 hours before it passed. Goes to show that there is a price to pay for habitually not drinking enough water.
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
May 5, 2013 - 05:27am PT
KenM, when I initially went to the hospital, I was given Toradol....along with Fentanyl. I was a very happy camper after that.

And I agree that if you are going to do this at home, and not have the benefit of IV drugs in the hospital, forget the Percocet.....accept nothing but morphine.

The nurse in the hospital shared the same thing about babies versus stones....she had 3 kids as well....her one kidney stone was by far worse.

I should get the results back this week, in regards to what food caused my stone. I'm certain it's not a dehydration issue....I drink more water than most fish....always have.
madbolter1

Big Wall climber
Denver, CO
May 6, 2013 - 12:09am PT
Another thing that occurred to me:

When you give birth to a baby, you've really got something to show for the pain and effort. When you give birth to that little fleck of a pebble, you really have almost nothing to show for it.

The pain to gain ratio is quite whacked!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 6, 2013 - 01:59am PT
Goes to show that there is a price to pay for habitually not drinking enough water.

I rarely drink water, after all, I'm Irish. Beer is the answer.
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