Giving it all up. OT

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Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 14, 2013 - 04:08pm PT
Hey,

Big changes here, the house I live in is going on the market this summer. My dad is my landlord. He's giving up his business as an electrical contractor to move south. My brother is his apprentice, and he's moving to Colorado. So, I've got to move out of a neighborhood I grew up in. I'm single, early thirties, and have nothing keeping me here other than my animals.

My heart tells me to give up my meager worldly possessions and my dogs to travel central and south america indifenitely. Working for however long I want in a given place. I've got a trade to use, and there are options like woofers where room and board could be procured. This wouldn't be a long vacation, more like a classy vagabond existence.

Has anyone here done this? It's extremely appealing to me. I'm not averse to hardship or poverty, it's the wealth gained through experience that draws me.



Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:10pm PT
Have you noticed the dogs looking at you in a weird way since you've concocted
this scheme? Don't think they don't know already.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:13pm PT
A) A DOG is NOT something you just give up..Not in one last little bit..

B) You plan to roam the highest homicide rated places in the world

C) Why not roam the Americas?
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 04:16pm PT
My old dog is the crux. I'm not sure if I can leave him in even the best of families. Honestly, he's been everywhere with me for nine years.

And, the Americas go way south of Texas.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:20pm PT
That Dog would never leave you..Its not a choice. I would cut off a leg before leaving my dog. Try Elko- they seem to be constructing steadily in the gold minning bubble going on there- right next to the Yosemite of NV..
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:22pm PT
Follow your dreams. Sounds pretty fun. Just make sure your old buddy is taken care of first... not "taken care of" but you know...
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:32pm PT
I have only done this on a small scale, for one year. Tahoe, Boston, Eastern Europe, Central America. But I know several people who have tried to do the long haul.

Seems like the only people who become permanent ex-pats or vagabonds do so because the're mad about something. Other vagabonds I know/knew travel until they realize that everywhere is essentially the same because humans are humans, and then learn to satisfy themselves with things like friends and family instead of locations and experiences. Someone in the USA dreams of travelling around South America, then they meet a South American who wants to get away to Europe, then they meet a European who wants to go to the USA, and everyone keeps moving until they realize that location isn't the important part of life.

Of course these are just some observations and generalizations, so who knows. I vote go for it so you don't regret not knowing, but I think you'll be back. Or at least permanently settled somewhere. You won't know unless you give it a shot! Sometimes learning something isn't right for you is just as important as finding something that is.

The short version: do it
Leggs

Sport climber
Home away from Home
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:33pm PT
Let your instincts guide you, Brandon, and enjoy the journey of making the decision.
I don't feel the need to pipe in and tell you what to do with your doggie... you're not an idiot.

~peace
10b4me

Boulder climber
takin' the scenic route to Montana
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:34pm PT
how old is the dog? 9 or older?
and if you have had the dog for nine years, it will be hard on it for you to up and leave.
you're young. got plenty of years to travel
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 04:43pm PT
Do you think if I bought a ticket for him, I could park the dog in a seat on busses?

That would be stressful, but way better than travelling without him.
happiegrrrl

Trad climber
www.climbaddictdesigns.com
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:47pm PT
If the dog is certified as a service dog, they can go anywhere. But I have the feeling your dog, like my precious Teddy, isn't an official service dog.



And no...city buses don't generally allow dogs on board. Nor does Amtrak, nor doe the US National Park Service, not a host of other places. (But Metro North train DOES!)


Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:47pm PT
I'd take Rons advice. Never leave the confines of Camp Nevadastan and nurture your inner paranoia.

And get well armed just in case.
Chim-Chim

climber
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:48pm PT
Dogs... right what about the younger dog? I've traveled for years but when you decide to be a dog owner you have to wait till the right time comes to start worldly travels. Don't just sell your things, drop the dog(S) off somewhere because it sound appealing. You're young the world isn't going anywhere, at least I hope not. My pooch found me and sasha we're going to forego international travel until it's the right time . Ron is right travel the U.S. don't betray your animals!
cleo

Social climber
the canyon below the Ditch!!!!
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:48pm PT
Wwofing might be an option, but I'm not sure you can expect any compensation other than room and board while traveling, because:

a) there are already lots of people who have skills in trades in foreign countries

b) the standards for trades might be lots lower - somebody's uncle might be hired instead, regardless of skill (*not my experience, but I talked to a well-traveled Canadian electrician about this issue in SE Asia)

and

c) if they really are looking for skilled workers, you probably need an official work permit, unless you already have a contact

Are you under 30? You might look into "Working Holiday" visas. Many countries offer then, including New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the UK, etc. I'm not sure about South America, but I'd recommend looking closely into it if you plan on depending on any sort of income while you traveling (traveler's forums might have a lot of answers - googling your questions is a good place to start).


Good luck, and hell yes go for it.
cleo

Social climber
the canyon below the Ditch!!!!
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:50pm PT
Oh, and dogs are awesome, but I'd try and see if a good friend might be willing to watch them for a few months. I would not try foreign travel with a dog unless you have a LOT of money.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:53pm PT
Go for it. Make sure you're wanderings tske you as far as Patagonia. If you're there next Dec. to March check out our place on Lago General Carrera. Might even save an unclimbed peak for you.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:53pm PT
Brandon, make an offer to the owner of this place in El Chalten to put in
a couple of windows. Sheesh, you'd think you'd want one to look at
Fitzroy, wouldn't you?

Credit: Reilly

Or maybe you could build a stairway for this guy!
Credit: Reilly

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 04:56pm PT
Dogs... right what about the younger dog?

Dogs, plural. The younger one is great, but dumb and happy enough to be stoked with any good owner. Sounds callous, but it's true. My old man owns his litter mate and would be happy to take him. The two dogs have grown up together.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:56pm PT
I love dogs WAY more than people. I fail to see how leaving a good dog in a good home is a bad thing. It is a relationship after all and when the autumn moon lights your way you gotta ramble on. When my dog decided to wander NV or MT or CO for a couple days I wasn't about to interfere with his decision.

I know a lady who takes old dogs from similar situations and gives them some of the best years of their lives. Way better than if they had been resented for changing with the original owner's path in life.

Obviously you'd have to make sure he was going to a good place.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:58pm PT
Reilly, El Chalten is an abomination.....it makes the towns of Moab and Joshua Tree, as totally sucky as they are, actually look good. When i first went down there was just a large field full of sheep where the town now is. The sheep heard you were coming and fled before the first building went up.
Binks

climber
Uranus
Mar 14, 2013 - 04:59pm PT
Has anyone done this?

Yes, and after about 6 months the romanticism of it fades. I wouldn't plan "indefinitely". Try a shorter span.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 05:05pm PT
In a perfect world, I'd like to travel until I found a place down south to spend a few years in.

Lacking capital, I'm not sure how feasible that is as a foreigner. I can sure find out though.

Gotta figure out the dog first though. I'm very attached to him.

I could give him to my ex, who raised him for his first five years with me. He'd love it, but...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 05:08pm PT
Jim, I'd give El Chalten at least a couple steps on Joshua Tree. Granted,
it doesn't have a Circle K, but I didn't find it hard to put up with this:

Credit: Reilly

And you won't find this in JTree:
The one that couldn't run fast enough.
The one that couldn't run fast enough.
Credit: Reilly
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 14, 2013 - 05:09pm PT
Find the right place for the dogs and do this!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 14, 2013 - 05:17pm PT
Okay....Fitzroy does make a good backdrop. So that picture is supposed to make me believe you only eat sheep?
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Mar 14, 2013 - 05:59pm PT
You should buy a plane ticket to Australia/New Zealand. That's pretty down south, and the climbing is supposed to be awesome.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Mar 14, 2013 - 06:32pm PT
I'd invest in a good vehicle which you can live out of and tour the US for a year or two - see where that leads you. I've never tried to find work in a foreign country, but I'm thinking you'll have language and legal barriers with low pay.

The dogs - that's a tough one, but if you've spent most of your life on the east coast, you've probably got some sights to see from the Rockies west. Chances are those sights will satisfy your wanderlust.
Michelle

Social climber
Toshi's Station, picking up power converters.
Mar 14, 2013 - 06:37pm PT
It sounds like you've put alot of thought into this. I can relate to the pet thing. I had to do a search of my values in order to make my plan. The cat stays. It sounds like your pups have a good set up if you go. I wonder though, is this a reaction to these changes. If it's your dream, make it work. glad you took the time to receive input.

just my 2cents.

good vibes whatever you decide!

karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:27pm PT
just eat the dog, sheesh that was easy ;)

In all seriousness, get that dog a home and get going! Just take pics and check in so we can live vicariously. Got two kids that prevent me from traveling like that but when they grow up...
LilaBiene

Trad climber
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:54pm PT
Brandon, you should catch up with my younger brother. He has his own landscaping business that he operates spring - late fall, and then every year from Jan - March or so he travels all over the world. He lives in a group house to keep expenses super low.

Got him to try climbing a few days ago...

New partner in crime?!! LilaBiene's younger, dashing bro. EDIT: 12 May...
New partner in crime?!! LilaBiene's younger, dashing bro. EDIT: 12 May 2013 - my bro just fessed up that this is a stock photo of the route that he climbed - we had a really good laugh. :D Too funny!!!
Credit: Unknown

He's officially screwed...muah ha ha ha ha!
Kalimon

Trad climber
Ridgway, CO
Mar 14, 2013 - 08:01pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_347449&feature=iv&src_vid=ntm1YfehK7U&v=MUt7qmSvxLI
johntp

Trad climber
socal
Mar 14, 2013 - 08:06pm PT
The sheep heard you were coming and fled

Too funny! I've got a dirty mind....
phylp

Trad climber
Millbrae, CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 08:30pm PT
Brandon, I've "known" you for a while now on supertopo and you are so obviously such a good-hearted person. There are so many paths that could be a "right" path for you. But I'm not one to say "follow your heart". Rather, I would say, check in with your gut and your heart and your mind and see where you settle. The balance is important.

Maybe you could have everything your heart desires. One scenario (which incorporates something Ron recommended): Maybe move to an area in the US (with your doggie) where you could get some construction work and save up some bucks. But also a place with a community college where you could take some evening classes to expand your long-term career potential, either to synergize with and build on your construction expertise (spanish skills? management courses?), or to head in a different direction long term (health care? computer stuff?) You're smart enough that you could be a success in so many areas.

After a couple of years building a base, you might be in a much stronger position to then follow your wanderlust...
Just one perspective - you'll make the right choice for YOU!
xo Phyl

Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Mar 14, 2013 - 08:57pm PT
Sounds like fun, but is it practical? Only you will know, when you get there. I know you're in love with down south, but have you thought of trying out west? Colorado, near your bro might be an option, or Nevada, Cali ect.. Maybe pimp out a van and you can cruise up north for a couple this summer??

South would be fun too, but west could be done with your pups.

You'll figure it out..
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 14, 2013 - 09:08pm PT
Has anyone here done this? It's extremely appealing to me. I'm not averse to hardship or poverty, it's the wealth gained through experience that draws me.

Follow your heart, not your head.

Always. Especially in matters of love.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 14, 2013 - 09:31pm PT
I guess you're not gonna die. Nobody's tossed that out here yet, so I call "No dyin'" on ya, just for luck.

Whatever you do: Don't jump into this, and don't rely on wages, don't get too outrageous, don't check the Yellow Pages.

Do, however: Take time over ANY decision, sift as MANY opps and scenarios that you can, even if they come from the KillerTaco, and practice your Spanish, it's terrible, I'm sure, just like mine.

bwain-AH swear-tay

drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Mar 14, 2013 - 09:48pm PT
Do it, and take the damn dog!
But first
Spend the summer slangin' nitrous on Phish tour, maybe land a sick high end carpentry job somewhere, build up the nest egg ya know, do some climbing, reconnect with the west a bit, wait for it to get cold, grow a solid stache, then hit the road south.
Don't blog about it and make sure the Nano is anything but flouro green.
Do it, do it.




edit:
my nephew did the woofer thing for a year in AK and had a good experience.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Mar 14, 2013 - 09:51pm PT
Don't think about doing it, just do it, especially if you've got an inkling of a vision (which by all means it sounds like you do). You probably won't end up where you think you would, but part of the journey is crossing that valley or jungle, climbing up that ridge, etc. to see just what is beyond there. In the process you'll discover new paths and wonders (and struggles and tribulations) that you'd never have even imagined existed. You'll be the richer for it and so too, I'd hazard a guess, will the world.

Otherwise, you risk ending up being some grumpy old man posting away on the Taco Stand thirty years from now! :-) Instead, you can be a jello or donini. And I don't necessarily mean in terms of climbing greatness (though by all means go for it!). Rather more in terms of their positive and wise and playfully cantankerous outlooks.

All the best!

Eric

P.S. Age ain't a factor here either. Not a requirement to be young in years to do the above. I think our dear Lynnie is a good example of that. Be young in spirit like her and the rest will follow.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Social climber
SLO, Ca
Mar 14, 2013 - 09:52pm PT
To be honest if you are in your thirties, don't have a career and are still thinking that way you may as well just go for it. I am sure you would find a good situation for your dogs and could find your way around living / working.

That said, my experiences with people that have done the full ex-pat lifetime drop out thing have been negative in that I've seen high levels of alcoholism and this common general anger. A generalization I know, but whatev. Also, once you are rolling along and making a living in the economy of say, El Salvador, doing something like buying a plane ticket back to the U.S. becomes cost prohibitive.

I know you didn't ask for my advice but you posted a thread so you are going to get it anyway. Find seasonal work where you can make some $$. Fight forest fires, fish in AK, whatever. Then spend 5 or 6 months a year drifting around south america or wherever, still being able to withdraw money from an ATM and having a ticket home.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Mar 14, 2013 - 11:35pm PT
Good on your bro' Lilabiene! Now what the heck is that gnarl he's climbing on? :-)

Eric
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Mar 15, 2013 - 04:52am PT
I'm with on the edge and scared to death. Save some money, try it for 6 months with a plane ticket home and then decide if you want to spend a longer time at it.

It is hard to find work in developing countries unless you work for an agency with outside money. The locals don't have enough for themselves and really resent a foreigner taking away work, especially an American venturing south of the border.
steveA

Trad climber
bedford,massachusetts
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:20am PT
Brandon,

My daughter has been on a 1 year road trip.

She just came back from the West, including Mexico,

She is in Patagonia, as I speak, hiking around.

Go for it, if your inclined.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:04am PT
I know a finish carpenter who took his skillz to Europe for a couple years... also rode motorcycles N-S across Africa with his new girly friend.

I'd make sure you have something to fall back on. Traveling friends generally agree, ~$1k usually works to get you an apartment and necessities while you find a job... once you realize you are sick of traveling.
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:07am PT
Ya know. . . I'm facin' the same thing. . . if this place sells, I think I'm gonna put everything in storage, buy a Sprinter Class B motorhome and hit the dusty road. . . can't put the concept away, really. . . been burnin' up GOOG (rhymes with spooge) lookin' at rigs. . .

SOMEBODY STOP ME!

:-)
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:10am PT
Oy, reading this from work isn't doing me any good ...
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:38am PT
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:42am PT
HohMahn!

I haven't seen WinnebagoMan in years. . . GOOD ONE, kennyt!

TFPU!
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:44am PT
Just tryin to do you a kindness
WBraun

climber
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:51am PT
The man who's bound and chained to his mortal body can't give anything up.

All attempts by such a bound soul is none other than false renunciation .......
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:55am PT
Funny thing, kennyt. . . motorhomes CAN be infuriating!

If I *DO* end up getting a Sprinter RoadTrek, it will be my third motorhome. . . I have a LOVE/HATE relationship with them. . . sometimes I just LOVE to HATE them!

:-)
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 15, 2013 - 11:12am PT
Go buy a used sailboat for 15K, make sure it is the proper model for cruising, and head off into the wild yonder.

I've got a good boat sitting on the hard right now. All waiting and ready to go. I've just got to get a little more money together.

I am still going to spend months this summer living on the boat and sailing her every day around Chesapeake Bay. I might bring it around into the Gulf later in the year, after Hurrican Season.

Next year? Gone baby gone. I have a list 2 inches thick of cool places to go. Even Chile and Argentina.

Ask Donini. Chile is a solid democracy with deep european roots. It isn't a mexican sh#t hole that is full of corrupt cops, robbers, and people who will cut off your head. It is a beautiful place as well.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Mar 15, 2013 - 11:13am PT
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath has a good point. You can just throw caution to wind and go (there are arguments to be made for that), but it can't hurt to have a backup fund in place that's good for a plane ticket or some other emergency that comes up. You basically stash whatever money there and then forget about it. Untouchable for wine, women, song, and cams.

Eric
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Mar 15, 2013 - 12:25pm PT
I never gave it all up. Never had the courage or whatever it is that it takes. I just sorta let life happen to me. Ended up with a great family and a lifetime of commitments and burdens. Were I to do it all over again?

If I knew then what I know now?

I still would never have given it all up. I think that's more a personal temperament than it is anything else. I've had a good life so far, incredibly lucky and I'm pretty good looking too :-)

So I can't offer you advice - 'do as I never done!' Unless, for you as it was for me, you just let life happen and it takes you to Argentina :-)

DMT
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 15, 2013 - 12:35pm PT
Yep....hit the road, hit the high seas, but with head in the clouds and your feet on the ground (so to speak).
That's kinda our lifestyle now, but we're early retirees...its still great but wish I'd done more when I was way younger.
Right now we spend 3 to 4 months crusing in this bad girl:

Hanlei Bay, Kauai.  This is why we do the work we do.
Hanlei Bay, Kauai. This is why we do the work we do.
Credit: SCseagoat

last year was Hawaii, Alaska then the Inside Passage, this year headed down to Sea of Cortez...in a another year down the Chilean Channel to South Georgia Island...hopefully to run into Base!

For landlubbing, I'm in negotiations for one of these bad boys..
Sportsmobile
Credit: SCseagoat

If you think you might like sailing to someplace, check out various sailing sites...there are always people with big sailboats or even big motor yachts looking for crew...no experience needed. There are lotsa people on the East Coast crusing down to BVI, the Gulf areas and on down to South America. Same on the West Coast, with people headed out to the South Pacific or on down to Mexico. There isn't much comparable to being 1000s of miles off shore...a very very special time.
If you are going to be around coastal towns and find one you like you could probably pick up a sailboat really cheap and live aboard. You meet the most interesting people that are crusiers!
The dogs, oh boy...tough one. I have a dog again and land travel not so bad, crusing, luckily we have a big boat and it works out. I had my old dog as far south as Baja (Loreto) and all was good.
Rockin' a panga on the Sea of Cortez...she would and get all excited when we'd go near dolphin pods.
Sea of Cortez, Loreto, Baja
Sea of Cortez, Loreto, Baja
Credit: SCseagoat

Good luck! It's hard to imagine not being on the road or on the sea (but I did "pay my dues"...so to speak)

Susan
wbw

Trad climber
'cross the great divide
Mar 15, 2013 - 12:43pm PT
I like dogs but I wouldn't let a dog keep me from seeking more meaning and experience from life.

And by the way Ron, he *is* talking about roaming the Americas. I know what you mean, but to a person from South America, that kind of comment is the characteristic arrogance that they most resent from the ugly American.
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 15, 2013 - 01:44pm PT
SOMEBODY STOP ME!



And I thought I wanted another RoadTrek!

UhOh!
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Mar 15, 2013 - 01:57pm PT
All I will add is this.... before you buy a Sailboat, Motorhome or any "life changing" deal.... maybe try it out first.

I had a boss who went and spent like 300 grand for a top of the line motorhome. After the retirement... he discovered he didn't really like being away from town, "hanging with strangers" for weeks on end. Motorhome got sold.

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2013 - 03:04pm PT
Wow, some very sage advice here, thanks!

A few thoughts, and nothing is meant to sound snarky so don't take it that way.

-I consider my carpentry work to be a career. I've chosen to not work as a GC anymore because subcontracting allows me much more freedom.

-I'd never leave without at least a grand in an emergency account.

-My travel would be primarily by bus. A vehicle would only get me to the Darien Gap, not SA. But the thought of driving is appealing, I could bring the hound.

-I don't own a lime green nano puff.

-I've been all around the western states. Lived in CO for two years and CA for nine.

-I love Latin culture, that's the real draw for me. Well, that and all the amazing people you meet when you're on the road.


I'm not sure if I'm going to do this or not, but it's certainly a viable option.

Thanks again for the input.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Mar 15, 2013 - 04:40pm PT
Brandon ,since college ,1979,i did some drifting,lived in Colorado ,California,West Virginia.I have been a carpenter since 77,you would be surprised how a carpenter from the NE can get work.Work can get you a good ways from here,just saying.Best of Luck
Homeowner now ,and its very hard to get away.Like DMT said,"if you knew then what you know now"
moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 15, 2013 - 04:47pm PT
Until about 5 years ago I wanted to sell my house, buy a boat and sail with my wife around the world for a year. Now, we are too old for that :( I am planing a more comfortable trip around the world now :) But I wish we have made that trip by boat. Wouldn't that be awesome?

Don't wait Brandon too long!

(Bring the dog along. If you get starved, you can eat it, just like the old Polar explorers did, Fridtjof Nanasen and such. Just ask Marlow.)
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2013 - 04:49pm PT
I hear ya on the east coast work ethic thing man. It's opened doors for me to install many times.

I'm pretty sure I don't want to know now what I'll know later. It's not the destination, it's the journey.

Super cliche, I know.

I seem to thrive in Latin America.

Hey Moose, thanks dude. I'm not sure that it's feasible to bring my dog with me. I'd be relying on public transportation.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Mar 15, 2013 - 04:57pm PT
moosedrool wrote:

> (Bring the dog along. If you get starved, you can eat it, just like
> the old Polar explorers did, Fridtjof Nanasen and such. Just ask Marlow.)

I was actually thinking of this earlier. :-) Specifically, it reminded me of an old sci-fi movie with a young Don Johnson of all people. It's a good movie. Spoiler alert: at the end, he, his girlfriend and dog (who can talk by the way, this is post nuclear apocalypse) are facing starvation. She says we need to make the obvious decision. The next scene is of him and the dog. They are talking about how yummy she was! :-O

Eric
LilaBiene

Trad climber
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:01pm PT
When I was 18, I took off for Germany for a year because I figured if I waited, other stuff would get in the way. I hope I can manage another few years overseas here and there, just need to work out the finances (i.e., pay off student loans). (Other stuff WILL get in the way!)

And I seem to remember that you DO come from rather adventurous stock, no? (That picture of your grandpa skiing? Yeah, I think he'd give you a righteous nod.)

But, seriously, since we may have a chance to climb (if spring ever decides to roll on in), I'll bring my brother along and you guys can talk travel. He's been all over the world. (He was climbing in Vang Vieng per his photo caption that he sent me.)

His latest message: "So do you go to gyms to climb in winter? Is it pricey and do you need to invest in equipment to really start climbing?"

Muah ha ha ha! Evil grin. Reeling in the line...

And P.S. Ekat, the hubby and I have spent most of the winter scoping out livable transport, so I'M not gonna stop ya! ;D
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:03pm PT
It's never too late to take a stab at the Golden Ring.

With my youngest graduating college in May, our house of 19 years sold and emptied, and me not getting any younger, my wife and two corgis will be hitting the road with no plan other than to take 4 months touring the western US and looking for a place that calls to us to settle down. Work? I'll find something; obsessing about all the possible bad things that might happen is like praying for a disaster. I prefer to hold a place for our greatest dreams to be fulfilled.

Everything important will be in our RV; wife, dogs, climbing gear, books, and some clothes. The rest is just stuff.

Home, no matter where the wheels are parked.
Home, no matter where the wheels are parked.
Credit: Edge

I will turn 52 on the trip. It's time, I can feel it with every fiber of my being. Good luck Brandon.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:17pm PT
Maybe ill see ya out there Edge,Your words are good,ill be 54 this summer.Kind Regards
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:17pm PT
And P.S. Ekat, the hubby and I have spent most of the winter scoping out livable transport, so I'M not gonna stop ya! ;D

THANKS.

Check this one out. . . it really should win an award for most innovative ClassB Motorhome in North America:

neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:30pm PT
hey there say, brandon- ...

you've got a lot of both ends of the ol' line here, one ways
to tackle this, as to which way to go, etc...

so i can't say much... but let the pot stew just a bit, first...
following heart and gut feelings is good, but, following a fast
impulses due to soon coming change, can go wrong, fast...

when you do find the right trail though, the ol' pup dog
needs to be settled... sounds like your're adventures should
be more to 'temperary outings' if the dog is so attached to trust
and bond with you...


there may be a whole other better wonderful plan, nearby, just waiting
for you, that you don't see yet... that then, could very well lean
to your other dream, as well...

let the stew pot of thoughts and feeling settle a bit... and test
the nearby waters (states, nearby as well, not just home, as many of the states there are close together)...

:)

let us know, how it all turns out...

*my now ex, turned my last dogs into a bad situations,and i'd not want those kinds of sad troubles to hurt anyone... sometimes i still feel those painful times, and you don't want that, though mine, i could not stop...

you have a say, in your dog... dogs... :)
Timid TopRope

Social climber
'used to be Paradise, CA
Mar 15, 2013 - 05:31pm PT
Way to get after it, Edge, and getting your corgis on the adventure. Live the dream and keep your dogs = win win.
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Mar 15, 2013 - 06:00pm PT
Brandon, my advice is to do what your heart tells.

However, I took my dog Ci (border collie/lab) from Wales to London to California to Ireland.

I never gave up on him (he is no longer with us, sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, buried in a grave I dug overlooking the origins of the Liffey River in the Wicklow Mountains.).

Can you leave your dog with your dad?

You are quite young, I have no answers, as I am struggling with my own questions. Do I leave my partner into State care just so I can have some freedom? Do I care about her enough? Yes.

Apologies if that is not enough to answer your question.

I am as screwed up as... if I was a 14-year-old.

EDIT

It sounds exciting, traveling, and why not. See if you can find a good home for the dog. But whatever you do, do not have him/her put down. It's a life.

I am trying to save some urban foxes from mange (Wildlife Trust, Dublin SPCA, Animal Foundation... all say they want to help me, but no action yet). And foxes are maligned, domestic dogs do more damage (especially in places like Ireland during lambing season), especially when two or three or more - they are pack animals after all - get together. Back home in Saranap (Walnut Creek/Lafayette), if a chicken or rabbit was gone - raccoon. Eggs eaten - skunk. Total chicken coop wiped out - domesticated dogs, not foxes.

When I moved to Enniskerry in 1997, the advice I was given, was... leave your dog on a leash if out walking, otherwise a farmer has the right to shoot him if he thinks during lambing season especially. I replied "My dog would never do that. He is a Welsh dog, raised in sheep country." Didn't cut any ice. So, I was very vigilant when out with Ci. He wouldn't do anything, but a farmer sees a dog in the field... bang.

Brandon, no guilt trip intended, but if your feet get itchy, make sure the pooch gets a fair deal.
Chugach

Trad climber
Vermont
Mar 15, 2013 - 07:55pm PT
I climbed and hitched 8,000 miles one summer and had the time of my life. I was 22 but I don't know if that matters. Do it! Take the leash off and run.
Lovegasoline

Trad climber
Sh#t Hole, Brooklyn, NY
Mar 15, 2013 - 09:39pm PT
Security can often leave one very insecure as it's accompanied by the anxieties of constantly having to defend it and the fear of losing it. You appear unburdened by imprisoning commitments or responsibilities (excepting the issue of your dog's future), young, healthy, and open minded.

Fear of becoming a rolling stone; fear of standing still and gathering moss.


Thinking it and doing it are two completely different orders of experience. You will have to trust your gut on this since no amount of pre-thought, over-determined planning, internet chit chat, or experiences of others can be your guide.

For another take on where your gut, heart, and head are at, you may want to give this a spin:
http://www.ichingonline.net/index.php


"Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back-- Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth that ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now."
Lovegasoline

Trad climber
Sh#t Hole, Brooklyn, NY
Mar 15, 2013 - 09:43pm PT
Fear of becoming a rolling stone. Fear of standing still and gathering moss.

Security can also leave one very insecure as it's accompanied by the anxieties of having to defend it and the fear of losing it. You appear young, healthy, adventurous, and unburdened by imprisoning commitments or responsibilities (excepting the issue of your dog's future).

Thinking it and doing it are two completely different orders of experience. You will have to trust your gut on this since no amount of pre-thought, over-determined planning, internet chit chat, or experiences of others can be your guide.


For another take on where your gut is at concerning taking off and/or your dog, you may want to give this a spin:
http://www.ichingonline.net/index.php



Than of course, regarding sending it, there's this:
"Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back-- Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth that ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now."
-Geothe (et al?)
mojede

Trad climber
Butte, America
Mar 15, 2013 - 09:55pm PT
Live and travel within YOUR means--what you know, what you can cope with, etc...

Fantasy is always free, everything else has a price; don't forget that.
bergbryce

Mountain climber
California
Mar 15, 2013 - 10:15pm PT
I couldn't leave me dog, no way in hades. I've only had him a year and a half and the joy I get out of him blows me away. Makes me wonder what a child might make me feel like?

Oh, but this is about you.... tough choices. Pare down your stuff and what's left I would put into storage. Pay for it for a year, maybe 18 months. If after a year or so of traveling, or of doing whatever, if you decide you don't want what's in that unit, forget about it and follow your new path.

I know when I went abroad for a year, I ended up missing people, familiar places, foods, etc. after being away for some time. Rediscovering some of that stuff like an old pair of skis and certainly the one photo album I do have brought back good memories and helped me feel grounded although my roots were kinda shallow.


Edited to add:
My opportunity came up fast and I had to decide quickly, whether or not to go. Granted it was a well paid gig, I was leaving a new, exciting lifestyle I felt I was just getting into. I had a lot of doubt but in the end am very glad I went for it. Living internationally is a very enriching experience.
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Mar 16, 2013 - 05:24am PT
The sheep heard you were coming and fled

Jim, don't tell me you are so inclined. ;-)

What's the old joke: Wales, where men are men and the sheep are scared. (told by either English or Scots)

Of course the Down Under version is:

New Zealand, where men are men and the sheep are scared. (Told by Aussies).

Or what a Dub would say: "Wicklow, where the men are men and the sheep are scared".

Same joke, just regional variations.

Or Woody Allen's Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex, with the one skit showing Gene Wilder, getting attached to a sheep, so to speak, and ended up drinking a bottle of Woolite, in the gutter. Gives new meaning to Skid Row.



Brandon, I don't know if they are still available but there are student work permit exchange programs (my first work in France and in Ireland were with such six-month permits).

Enroll in your local community college, get your student ID and then apply for such a permit.

I cannot remember what the criteria was back then, but I think you had to show you were a full-time student (12 units or something like that). And I think there was also an age limit. That said, there are ways around it (I got a student work permit when I was 39 to work in Ireland this time around. Still here after 17 years). Actually I was doing an unpaid, I stress unpaid, 13-month internship for my masters in Michael D Higgins office (Department of Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht). He was minister then. Now he is president of Ireland.

And the criteria was you had to get it before arriving in the exchange country, but my last one I wrangled while here in Dublin.

But if you try and get one for France, avoid August. Everything shuts down in Paris. Believe me, it can be a nightmare. And I love Paris and Parisians.

JIm Brennan is right, I talk too much about myself, but those are my experiences. Travel Dude.

I think that both dogs would be happy with your dad, if he was willing. I'd imagine he'd want you to travel and see parts of the world.

Best wishes with whatever you decide.

And many of the comments posted are excellent. For example... below.
Don Paul

Big Wall climber
Colombia, South America
Mar 16, 2013 - 05:39am PT
Brandon you've got it made. I wish my family had moved to Colorado but my dad was employed in New York. Yuck! If you don't want to live in his basement, maybe I can? Seriously, if you can speak a little spanish, South America is a great place to explore. What you need is time and patience for third world travel. As for employment my guess is that you will not want to work for the wages down there as a tradesman, also all the construction methods are different. You may be able to get a job as an English teacher, lots of gringos do that. But getting a work visa anywhere is a serious pain and not something you do on the go.

I would plan on about 6 months. You will get tired of it eventually. But also when you get older you may never have six months free like that. I know I don't. I am heading back to Colombia in three weeks and really excited about it. Its a great place but the climbing is not really developed. The tourist scene is in Ecuador and Peru, maybe start there if you want to get used to it. Whatever you do, save two months to hang out in Patagonia, in fact you might even just start there.
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Mar 16, 2013 - 06:12am PT
Someone in the USA dreams of travelling around South America, then they meet a South American who wants to get away to Europe, then they meet a European who wants to go to the USA, and everyone keeps moving until they realize that location isn't the important part of life.

Limpingcrab is so right. A place is what you make it.

I stay in Ireland because it is the best bet for Jennie (though she does not think so at times), but I long for Patagonia, the Caribbean, New Zealand.

Brandon, get out and about, the 30s are young nowadays. Six months, a year, your dogs, if well treated will remember you and welcome you back. You say that one is nine years, am I correct? What breed?

Nine years is really old for an Irish Wolfhound, but for a smaller breed like a Jack Russell, halfway point.

I put Ci into six-month's quarantine when moving from California to Ireland. This was before pet passports (rabies... Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Britain, Japan and a couple of other places, all rabies free, to the best of my knowledge).

Six months, I visited him and ran around in the yard/enclosure at least once a week. But on reflection, I would never, ever, do that again. Six months is a long prison sentence for a dog.

Brandon, talk with your dad and brother. There is always/mostly a solution. But yes, while one poster said the world will always be here (hopefully), get out.

I was just joking with Jennie about the fact that science says procreation does not need men anymore. She laughed when I said that ETs will arrive to an Earth with only human women.

But I am sure there will be male and female dogs.

Good luck Brandon, my thoughts are with you. And my thoughts are with other Taco Standers having to make tough decisions...
Captain...or Skully

climber
Mar 16, 2013 - 08:33am PT
Regret is the worst thing in Life.
Go, Brandon. Find a Way and Go.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Mar 16, 2013 - 09:59am PT
it's a hard life... if you are seeking affirmation you probably aren't going to fare well. In the end you have to do it for yourself, and make choices that no one else would probably think are wise.

So you should take a hard look at your motives, including why it is that your posted here. No one replying to this thread has to make that decision, it is your decision, and you will live with your choice, not us.




As for an RV... a recollection...

weezy

climber
Mar 16, 2013 - 10:28am PT
i'm going to be in the same boat, brandon. me ma's going to retire this year and move into the house i built for her so that means i gotta find new digs. i have a dog as well but no way am i getting rid of her. we are a team.

don't know if i'll rent a place or buy a van and blow this town. i can't afford to rent a place by myself and i have absolutely no desire for roommates at my age. plus, having a dog makes finding a place harder. i don't really have any close friends or other obligations keeping me here in moab, although i do want to be available to my mom if she needs help around the house. i'd love bail this country completely but not sure really how to go about it with my dog. anywhere with lots of singletrack and easy granite will suit me just fine.
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Mar 16, 2013 - 10:31am PT
I couldn't leave me dog, no way in hades.

Totally agree.....


Yep, go for it... bring along the doggy and the Central American Chica...



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travels_with_Charley:_In_Search_of_America
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 16, 2013 - 01:09pm PT
Many dogs are really not good for house or backyard dogs. Goldens, Labs, and other retrievers and hunting type dogs are much happier on a farm where they can run free and chase cows and stuff.

I have a Golden that I love to death, but I might give her to a friend who lives in the country and loves his dogs.

As for giving it all up, sell everything or give it away. I just bought a sailboat. It is famously seaworthy and cheaper by a longshot than a new car. This model of boat has done countless ocean crossings and quite a few circumnavigations. You can find them for less than ten grand and put in the work necessary.

1973 Albin Vega. Totally beefed up. I don't have the dodger or windvane installed. I'll do that this summer.

Credit: BASE104
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Mar 19, 2013 - 04:56am PT
Basey boy (sort of like Count Basie)

Lovely looking boat. I am envious.

I sent you an email.
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