Giving it all up. OT

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Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 14, 2013 - 07:08pm PT
Hey,

Big changes here, the house I live in is going on the market this summer. My dad is my landlord. He's giving up his business as an electrical contractor to move south. My brother is his apprentice, and he's moving to Colorado. So, I've got to move out of a neighborhood I grew up in. I'm single, early thirties, and have nothing keeping me here other than my animals.

My heart tells me to give up my meager worldly possessions and my dogs to travel central and south america indifenitely. Working for however long I want in a given place. I've got a trade to use, and there are options like woofers where room and board could be procured. This wouldn't be a long vacation, more like a classy vagabond existence.

Has anyone here done this? It's extremely appealing to me. I'm not averse to hardship or poverty, it's the wealth gained through experience that draws me.



Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:10pm PT
Have you noticed the dogs looking at you in a weird way since you've concocted
this scheme? Don't think they don't know already.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:13pm PT
A) A DOG is NOT something you just give up..Not in one last little bit..

B) You plan to roam the highest homicide rated places in the world

C) Why not roam the Americas?
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 07:16pm PT
My old dog is the crux. I'm not sure if I can leave him in even the best of families. Honestly, he's been everywhere with me for nine years.

And, the Americas go way south of Texas.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:20pm PT
That Dog would never leave you..Its not a choice. I would cut off a leg before leaving my dog. Try Elko- they seem to be constructing steadily in the gold minning bubble going on there- right next to the Yosemite of NV..
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:22pm PT
Follow your dreams. Sounds pretty fun. Just make sure your old buddy is taken care of first... not "taken care of" but you know...
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:32pm PT
I have only done this on a small scale, for one year. Tahoe, Boston, Eastern Europe, Central America. But I know several people who have tried to do the long haul.

Seems like the only people who become permanent ex-pats or vagabonds do so because the're mad about something. Other vagabonds I know/knew travel until they realize that everywhere is essentially the same because humans are humans, and then learn to satisfy themselves with things like friends and family instead of locations and experiences. Someone in the USA dreams of travelling around South America, then they meet a South American who wants to get away to Europe, then they meet a European who wants to go to the USA, and everyone keeps moving until they realize that location isn't the important part of life.

Of course these are just some observations and generalizations, so who knows. I vote go for it so you don't regret not knowing, but I think you'll be back. Or at least permanently settled somewhere. You won't know unless you give it a shot! Sometimes learning something isn't right for you is just as important as finding something that is.

The short version: do it
Leggs

Sport climber
Home away from Home
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:33pm PT
Let your instincts guide you, Brandon, and enjoy the journey of making the decision.
I don't feel the need to pipe in and tell you what to do with your doggie... you're not an idiot.

~peace
10b4me

Boulder climber
takin' the scenic route to Montana
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:34pm PT
how old is the dog? 9 or older?
and if you have had the dog for nine years, it will be hard on it for you to up and leave.
you're young. got plenty of years to travel
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 07:43pm PT
Do you think if I bought a ticket for him, I could park the dog in a seat on busses?

That would be stressful, but way better than travelling without him.
happiegrrrl

Trad climber
www.climbaddictdesigns.com
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:47pm PT
If the dog is certified as a service dog, they can go anywhere. But I have the feeling your dog, like my precious Teddy, isn't an official service dog.



And no...city buses don't generally allow dogs on board. Nor does Amtrak, nor doe the US National Park Service, not a host of other places. (But Metro North train DOES!)


Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:47pm PT
I'd take Rons advice. Never leave the confines of Camp Nevadastan and nurture your inner paranoia.

And get well armed just in case.
Chim-Chim

climber
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:48pm PT
Dogs... right what about the younger dog? I've traveled for years but when you decide to be a dog owner you have to wait till the right time comes to start worldly travels. Don't just sell your things, drop the dog(S) off somewhere because it sound appealing. You're young the world isn't going anywhere, at least I hope not. My pooch found me and sasha we're going to forego international travel until it's the right time . Ron is right travel the U.S. don't betray your animals!
cleo

Social climber
the canyon below the Ditch!!!!
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:48pm PT
Wwofing might be an option, but I'm not sure you can expect any compensation other than room and board while traveling, because:

a) there are already lots of people who have skills in trades in foreign countries

b) the standards for trades might be lots lower - somebody's uncle might be hired instead, regardless of skill (*not my experience, but I talked to a well-traveled Canadian electrician about this issue in SE Asia)

and

c) if they really are looking for skilled workers, you probably need an official work permit, unless you already have a contact

Are you under 30? You might look into "Working Holiday" visas. Many countries offer then, including New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the UK, etc. I'm not sure about South America, but I'd recommend looking closely into it if you plan on depending on any sort of income while you traveling (traveler's forums might have a lot of answers - googling your questions is a good place to start).


Good luck, and hell yes go for it.
cleo

Social climber
the canyon below the Ditch!!!!
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:50pm PT
Oh, and dogs are awesome, but I'd try and see if a good friend might be willing to watch them for a few months. I would not try foreign travel with a dog unless you have a LOT of money.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:53pm PT
Go for it. Make sure you're wanderings tske you as far as Patagonia. If you're there next Dec. to March check out our place on Lago General Carrera. Might even save an unclimbed peak for you.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:53pm PT
Brandon, make an offer to the owner of this place in El Chalten to put in
a couple of windows. Sheesh, you'd think you'd want one to look at
Fitzroy, wouldn't you?

Credit: Reilly

Or maybe you could build a stairway for this guy!
Credit: Reilly

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 14, 2013 - 07:56pm PT
Dogs... right what about the younger dog?

Dogs, plural. The younger one is great, but dumb and happy enough to be stoked with any good owner. Sounds callous, but it's true. My old man owns his litter mate and would be happy to take him. The two dogs have grown up together.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:56pm PT
I love dogs WAY more than people. I fail to see how leaving a good dog in a good home is a bad thing. It is a relationship after all and when the autumn moon lights your way you gotta ramble on. When my dog decided to wander NV or MT or CO for a couple days I wasn't about to interfere with his decision.

I know a lady who takes old dogs from similar situations and gives them some of the best years of their lives. Way better than if they had been resented for changing with the original owner's path in life.

Obviously you'd have to make sure he was going to a good place.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Mar 14, 2013 - 07:58pm PT
Reilly, El Chalten is an abomination.....it makes the towns of Moab and Joshua Tree, as totally sucky as they are, actually look good. When i first went down there was just a large field full of sheep where the town now is. The sheep heard you were coming and fled before the first building went up.
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