Giant meteorite fireball hits Russia!

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YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 15, 2013 - 01:23am PT
Lots of great footage coming out of Russia right now!



Listen to this window breaking sonic boom!

YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 15, 2013 - 01:25am PT
another good boom:

climbskiBURCH

Ice climber
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:26am PT
That. is unreal.
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 15, 2013 - 01:26am PT
This one is awesome, looks like it's coming right at the car:

YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 15, 2013 - 01:29am PT
Boom!

McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:30am PT
wow! amazing how bright it got.
John M

climber
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:38am PT
That was a lot of broken windows. Wow..
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 15, 2013 - 01:43am PT
It's crazy, but this thing almost feels like a hoax in some way. All of these shots of broken windows, but we never actually see any glass fall.

I do think it's real, but man, sometimes it's hard to tell these days.
John M

climber
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:45am PT
http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/02/15/16969092-fireball-sparks-alarm-in-russia
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 15, 2013 - 02:14am PT
Here's another good view of the fireball

Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Feb 15, 2013 - 02:48am PT
Thanks YS! Crazy!!
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Feb 15, 2013 - 02:58am PT
Wow, these Russians are so nonchalant! I be screaming at least out of excitement at how cool this was. And problem something a bit more graphic for the ones that appeared to be approaching the area of the vehicles! :-)

Do all Russians drive around recording their daily routes? Or maybe these were police or other official vehicles that are required to record?

Very cool!

Eric
weezy

climber
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:02am PT
Do all Russians drive around recording their daily routes? Or maybe these were police or other official vehicles that are required to record?




http://www.animalnewyork.com/2012/russian-dashcam/
pell

Trad climber
Sunnyvale
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:17am PT
Do all Russians drive around recording their daily routes?

Almost all. A wide-angle loop-writing camcoder is really cheap. Sometimes it is the only chance to have a fair trial in Russia.

Here is an example why Russian drivers need camcoders:

Without camera this driver would get several years sentence (probably it's not bad at all, ref. 0:33 - it is mad to drive so close to pedestrian at that speed).
Norwegian

Trad climber
Pollock Pines, California
Feb 15, 2013 - 07:02am PT
i was half way up a route at sugarloaf,
climbing in the early morning light on
the west-facing aspect of my mountain
when the coloma meteor passed thru
our california sky.

for a second or two, the rock face
brightened as if high noon had arrived
with short notice.

so i turn around to see who's sparking
an arc welder at the bottom of my climb
and i see a bright giant glowing fireball
shooting (not to fast though, more like
a fast jet than a shooting star)
down the 50 corridor.

about 40 seconds later it detonates
and shakes all serenities within
two forevers, including me and
my hand jam in the mountain.

i had no phone or device,
so i was certain that we'd been bombed,
and that san francisco was in deteriorating
shambles. i calmly finished my pitch,
then rapped down, downed a beer,
and jugged my rope toward
the end of the world.

the only foe of the moment
was that my dog high-tailed it
outta there when the explosion occurred,
and it took me two trips back up to
sugarloaf to find her.

sweet sky candy on that one.
Srbphoto

climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 15, 2013 - 09:44am PT
not sure what is scarier the meteorite or the way that driver passed another car as they were passing a school bus.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 10:03am PT
Meteorite hits central Russia, more than 500 people hurt
By Natalia Shurmina and Andrey Kuzmin | Reuters – 24 mins ago

http://news.yahoo.com/possible-meteor-shower-reported-eastern-russia-052833588.html


Sad for their pain and hurt.


can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 10:15am PT
I wonder what NASA would do if they found out that an end of the world meteorite or other kind of large space debris was going to hit the earth soon?

Do they tell the population?

There's nothing we can do to avoid it so why have a "Lord of the Flies" party?
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 15, 2013 - 10:15am PT
Looks like a swarm

The shockwave hits about a minute into the vid.

Probably not produced by the same chunk that produced the contrail.



http://rt.com/news/meteorite-crash-urals-chelyabinsk-283/
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:07am PT
http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/

you can watch today's flyby here:
http://www.space.com/19781-asteroid-2012-da14-flyby-webcasts.html

streaming live from JPL...


10b4me

Boulder climber
Somewhere on 395
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:13am PT
It's time for a new ice age
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:20am PT
Wow- amazing video. That's not a hoax

The largest meteorite impact in recorded history actually hit Russia back in 1908 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event

The Tungusta Event: from Wiki (edited excerpt)


"The Tunguska event was an enormously powerful explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River on June 30 1908... Different studies have yielded widely varying estimates of the object's size, on the order of 100 metres. It is the largest impact event on or near Earth in recorded history...

Although the meteoroid or comet appears to have burst in the air rather than hitting the surface, this event still is referred to as an impact. Estimates of the energy of the blast range from 5 to as high as 30 megatons of TNT with 10–15 megatons of TNT the most likely—roughly equal to the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear bomb tested on March 1, 1954; about 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan...

The Tunguska explosion knocked an estimated 80 million trees down over an area covering 2,150 square kilometres (830 sq mi). It is estimated that the shock wave from the blast would have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale. An explosion of this magnitude is capable of destroying a large metropolitan area..."









Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:24am PT
I don't get it. In TGT's vid the thing is long gone and then there is the
big explosion, which didn't sound like a sonic boom, and smoke rising from
that building and what sounds like gunfire.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:40am PT
Lots of overpressure and probably hundreds of secondary fires and explosions. The pops could be something as simple as streetlights exploding.




Note to self;

When there's a big fireball in the sky,

Don't look out the window!

Looks like the local galvanizing plant took a direct hit.

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:46am PT
My question is; would the government or the scientist really tell us the truth if an asteroid was about to hit the earth,
or would they fudge a little to keep the worldwide panic down?

Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:49am PT
Perhaps not as massive and as famous as the Sikhote-Alin ...










But when they triangulate, search, and find, some Russians are going to make some good money when they locate fragments of this witnessed meteorite fall. Good time to look in the winter.

Seems like many witnessed falls have occurred these last few years around the world. Maybe people are just waking-up to the phenom more and we're all carrying cameras in our pockets. The scientific community is greatly benefiting from these "Poor Man Space-probes" that are scientifically priceless, not to mention their monetary worth.
dave

climber
Earth
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:51am PT
There's nothing we can do to avoid it so why have a "Lord of the Flies" party?

So we can have a 'lord of the flies party'!?


I think meteorites are worth a lot of money, I would be trying to scoop as many fragments as possible, maybe donate them to Wang Chung so he can get his dogs to the states or those kids in Peru who were viciously attacked for no reason;)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:53am PT
Klimmer, cool stamp! Pricey stamp - 40 kopecks in 1957 would have been like a day's wages!
Actually, probably only a half day.
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:55am PT

Just two nights ago there was a special on PBS(???) that was discussing a meteor that was going to PASS the Earth by 17,000+ miles on 2/14/2013 (Yesterday)...

ODD timing...


EDITED:

Very strange that the same day a Meteor is supposed to PASS by...

a meteor, HITS...

Michelle

Social climber
Toshi's Station, picking up power converters.
Feb 15, 2013 - 11:57am PT
Side note. I was living in Twain Harte when the sound of a HUGE explosion woke us up. Apparently, a meteor flew by and landed somewhere outside of Tuolumne City.
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 15, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
Phil Plait aka The Bad Astronomer has some good info here:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy.html

"I don’t know how big the meteoroid (the solid part) of this was. The information is too scattered; we’d need the position of the people who took the videos to triangulate and see how far up the debris trail is, for example. I’ll note that people were taking video of the trail for some time before the explosion is heard, which is consistent with it being the shock wave from the passage of the meteoroid through our atmosphere high above the ground. I know a lot of folks will think that’s the sound from the explosion due to impact, but it’s more likely to be the sonic boom from something big moving at multiple times the speed of sound through the air."
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:06pm PT
This segment gives a bit better timing on the shock waves.

85 sec from the beginning of the vid to the shock wave arrival and the vid has already started for 15- 30 sec or so At +/- 1000 fps the explosion happened at least 20 mi away. Probably at the first visible sign of the vapor trail.

The smaller explosions are shockwaves from the smaller chunks that were trailing the big one impacting thicker air and breaking up.


locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:07pm PT


Correction:

Today is the day the Asteroid is supposed to be passing closely by...

http://earthsky.org/space/asteroid-2012-da14-will-pass-very-close-to-earth-in-2013





Is it CONNECTED???...
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:14pm PT
My question is; would the government or the scientist really tell us the truth if an asteroid was about to hit the earth,
or would they fudge a little to keep the worldwide panic down?



Hey Cosmic,

Someone already knows and has told us already before it even happens ...


My Earth Science students see the excellent NGS DVD: "Asteroids--Deadly Impact" with the late great Dr. Gene Shoemaker, the father of Astrogeology. In the video he is talking about Meteor Crater in Arizona and describing what it would have looked like had we been there, "... you would have seen a mountain coming out of the sky ..." Pretty dramatic description and then they model it in cgi.

At the end of the dvd they say regarding a massive impact to Earth, "it's not a matter of if, but when."


Got that right!




(No, I don't tell my students about the "Secret Forbidden Knowledge" that follows.)


Then there is this description from the Book of Revelation:



Revelation 8:1-10 (KJV)

[1] And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour.
[2] And I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpets.
[3] And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne.
[4] And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.
[5] And the angel took the censer, and filled it with fire of the altar, and cast it into the earth: and there were voices, and thunderings, and lightnings, and an earthquake.
[6] And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.
[7] The first angel sounded, and there followed hail and fire mingled with blood, and they were cast upon the earth: and the third part of trees was burnt up, and all green grass was burnt up.
[8] And the second angel sounded, and as it were a great mountain burning with fire was cast into the sea: and the third part of the sea became blood;
[9] And the third part of the creatures which were in the sea, and had life, died; and the third part of the ships were destroyed.
[10] And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;
[11] And the name of the star is called Wormwood: and the third part of the waters became wormwood; and many men died of the waters, because they were made bitter.
[12] And the fourth angel sounded, and the third part of the sun was smitten, and the third part of the moon, and the third part of the stars; so as the third part of them was darkened, and the day shone not for a third part of it, and the night likewise.
[13] And I beheld, and heard an angel flying through the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice, Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabiters of the earth by reason of the other voices of the trumpet of the three angels, which are yet to sound!




I can not think of a more accurate description from a vision nearly 2000 years ago of a massive asteroid event slamming into Earth, in Earth's future.




Then we have "Project Wormwood":

http://www.ips.gov.au/IPSHosted/neo/







Ok, everyone have a great day!

:-0

Lol.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:23pm PT
This one was on a perpendicular trajectory to the asteroid.
No relation between the two.

The damage to the Zinc factory was all due to overpressure and an old brick structure. No impact there.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:26pm PT
Credit: Ron Anderson


my hunk of asteroid..Found in the NV desert.
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:26pm PT
"This one was on a perpendicular trajectory to the asteroid.
No relation between the two."
...


thanks!!!...






EDITED for CORRECTION:

It was just on the NEWS (TV)...

Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:28pm PT
Ron,

You sure that's not obsidian with concoidial fracturing?
BJ

climber
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:31pm PT
//This one was on a perpendicular trajectory to the asteroid.
No relation between the two.//

Source? Until I see otherwise, I will continue to believe this is associated debri with DA 14
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:31pm PT
Yes,, quite sure Klimmer.

Credit: Ron Anderson

I have all sorts of obsidian,, mahagony obsidian and such. This is nothing like it- nearly a molten steel feel and weight to it..


Credit: Ron Anderson
BJ

climber
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:33pm PT
You sure that's not obsidian with concoidial fracturing?

Density is a sure give-away
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:37pm PT


RON...

Maybe it's petrified DOO DOO...

Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:37pm PT
Carefully cut a small slice. Acid etch and see if it has Widmanstatten pattern, then you absolutely know you have an iron meteorite. Widmanstatten pattern takes millions of years of cooling in space to produce. Doesn't occur on Earth.


http://earthandsolarsystem.wordpress.com/2012/12/20/widmanstatten-patterns/




You have to prove its not slag from Earth. Looks like its already been cut??
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
NASA statement on Russian meteor:

"According to NASA scientists, the trajectory of the Russian meteorite was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, making it a completely unrelated object. Information is still being collected about the Russian meteorite and analysis is preliminary at this point. In videos of the meteor, it is seen to pass from left to right in front of the rising sun, which means it was traveling from north to south. Asteroid DA14's trajectory is in the opposite direction, from south to north."

---

That a larger asteroid might be accompanied by smaller debris doesn't seem too unlikely but is not the case here.

And yeah if you see a bright flash I guess you should go to a door if you really feel compelled to look. Learn something new every day.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:47pm PT
lol,, Klim ol buddy,, i have made arrowheads,, know the obsidian's well. I know quarts, and chirts etc etc etc. This came from a location where several pieces were found from an impact. It is an asteroid chunk. Or a petrified doodoo...
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:49pm PT


"That a larger asteroid might be accompanied by smaller debris doesn't seem too unlikely but is not the case here."...



Sure is an ODD coincidence....
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:50pm PT

Ron...

"I know quarts"... <<< (EDITED: I'll bet you do!!!)


^^^

LOL!!!...

Sort of makes me WONDER how well you KNOW...


QuartZ...
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 12:56pm PT
Just got this from Planetary Resources via email ...


Planetary Resources
http://www.planetaryresources.com/


Hi there -

You may have heard of the meteorite that struck the Russian Chelyabinsk region at about 09:15 local time in the region about 1,500 km (930 miles) east of Moscow in the Ural mountains. The damage caused by the shock wave has been extensive. As reports continue to stream in, the number of people injured has been increasingly steadily and nears 1,000, mostly caused by window glass blown out by the shockwave. The amateur videos and pictures illustrate the power that a small object entering the atmosphere at high speed can have.

Estimated at about 10 tons, and about 2 meters across, this object (called a bolide when they are this bright) streaked through the sky at a speed of 54,000 kph (33,000 mph), and due to the extreme forces of atmospheric entry, broke apart between 30-50 km (18-32 miles) above the ground. Despite the coincident timing, the Russian meteorite has nothing to do with 2012 DA14, as the objects have decidedly different trajectories. A fragment from 2012 DA14 would have been moving from south to north, the path of the meteorite is from northeast to southwest. We will certainly learn more about the nature of this object when fragments from it are recovered and studied in laboratories.

In our previous update, we mentioned that many asteroids pass by Earth with little or no warning. We were not exaggerating. Despite considerable progress in asteroid detection, only about one in ten close-approaching asteroids are known about ahead of time. While not every approaching asteroid may be detected, and with little warning not all can be prevented, in this case a little warning would have prevented many injuries, and quelled the panic that followed.

Today's events, both with 2012 DA14 and the Russian meteorite, are a reminder that our Solar System is a crowded place. Today was unnerving indeed, and scary and unfortunate for those near Chelyabinsk. We don’t know when the next one of these might appear, but we’re working to see it coming!

Be sure to watch the many live events going on today as 2012 DA14 safely passes by, and take the opportunity to learn more about these asteroids that are potentially hazardous, but potentially rich reserves of resources for our future prosperity on Earth and in space.

-Chris Lewicki
President & Chief Asteroid Miner


TwistedCrank

climber
Dingleberry Gulch, Ideeho
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:07pm PT
HOLY COW!

Those Ruskies have words for EVERYTHING!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:11pm PT
quartZ,quarts, kewartz..its in the ballpark!
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:21pm PT



"quartZ,quarts, kewartz..its in the ballpark!"...

Yeah...

But it was a FOUL ball and NOT a Home Run...

ROFL!!!...

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:23pm PT
I got yur foulball Locker,,,, HANGIN!;-)
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:24pm PT


LOL!!!...

Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:40pm PT
It would be cool to get a chunk of that thing

They sell meteorites at all the rock shows I go to.
They have named ones and regular unknown ones for sale
I saw one with a image of Jebus in it once!! not really, at least I couldn't see the image.

They cut them sometimes so you can see the inside, which is cool
I've seen knifes made out of them

I have a few, I posted a pic them some where on ST, I will have to dig them up.

They go from $1 to $10 a gram, which is expensive, since they weigh alot!

I pick up everything that looks like a meteorite when I'm walking in the field, I found some stuff that is magnetic, but I'm not sure if it came from space or not, it doesn't have that total meteor sculpted look
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:44pm PT
Yeah,, my chunk feels like molten steel.

Similar to welding slag the best way to describe it i suppose. I have another chunk my Dad got at Edwards when one hit the lake bed out there.
Majid_S

Mountain climber
Bay Area , California
Feb 15, 2013 - 01:58pm PT
Check out the power of blast 0.30 sec, took the whole roll up door out


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kvHl5Qcnzc
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Feb 15, 2013 - 02:51pm PT
Falling rocks is my main fear in climbing!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 02:53pm PT
Here ya go McHale, who needs asteroids? (and I won't chip in for yer therapy)

Live the dream!
Live the dream!
Credit: Reilly
rrider

climber
Mckinleyville, Ca
Feb 15, 2013 - 03:15pm PT
i like how the contrail looks twin-engined
crock

Trad climber
The Windiest Mountain, Wyoming
Feb 15, 2013 - 03:21pm PT
In Soviet Russia, asteroids play YOU!
McHale's Navy

Trad climber
Panorama City, California & living in Seattle
Feb 15, 2013 - 03:24pm PT
Thanks Reilly!
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Feb 15, 2013 - 03:38pm PT
"Despite considerable progress in asteroid detection, only about one in ten close-approaching asteroids are known about ahead of time. "


Great. That's just great.
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Feb 15, 2013 - 03:40pm PT

i like how the contrail looks twin-engined

Paul at bad astronomy said that indicates the mass split. Hence the two contrails.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 15, 2013 - 03:54pm PT
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:03pm PT


"i like how the contrail looks twin-engined"...

My original thought as well...

Figured it was probably a huge JET crashing and the FLASH was the fuel burning...

Seems it was WRONG thinking on my part...
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:10pm PT
We watched on hit out beyond Hawthorne Nevada one night from the side of Genoa peak- it streamed in with a flame tail and when it hit, it lit up everyone on the fire we were on for a second or two. It was in the middle of the night, and we were at the top of the fire having lined it taking a break.. I was quite the show. There was a simul---WHOOOAAAAAAA!
moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:10pm PT
Vladimir Zhirinovsky denies meteorite, claims US weapons tests

WHERE IS TONY???

http://en.apa.az/news/187943

And, of course the chemtrails!
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:13pm PT


"WHERE IS TONY???"...

GUD point!!!...


Rather than go around and around about all ths sh!t...

we should, "Just ask TONY!!!"...


LOL!!!...
Alexey

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:20pm PT
Translation of captions : Russian Post Service - Delivered
Translation of captions : Russian Post Service - Delivered
Credit: Alexey

Russian Post Service - Delivered
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:24pm PT
Some people chased Tony away from ST for good
shame on them
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 15, 2013 - 04:26pm PT

"Some people chased Tony away from ST for good
shame on them"
...


LOL!!!...

Is that TRUE???...



EDITED:


I sure am going to MISS that "Big headed fuker"...

;-)





moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Feb 15, 2013 - 05:14pm PT
I miss Tony too...
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Feb 15, 2013 - 05:18pm PT
Klimmer that weather report is classic!!
dave729

Trad climber
Western America
Feb 15, 2013 - 05:21pm PT
Until further notice by the government speed of sound is still way less than the speed of light. Takes couple of minutes for meteor sonic boom to travel 50miles down to frozen Russia. Ref lightning flashes and waiting for the boom sort of delay thingie.
eeyonkee

Trad climber
Golden, CO
Feb 15, 2013 - 06:19pm PT
I wonder why Russia and not, say, The Netherlands? Could it be that God hates Russians as much or even more than homosexuals? I turn to Pat Robertson for questions of this nature.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 15, 2013 - 06:20pm PT
If that was the case,, Washington DC would have been the impact zone..
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Feb 15, 2013 - 07:20pm PT
story on the issue of dashcams in russia...and videos that will make you cringe....

http://www.marketplace.org/topics/world/final-note/car-crash-videos-you-cant-stop-watching-and-why-russian-corruption-blame
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Feb 16, 2013 - 02:56am PT
Army units found three meteorite debris impact sites, two of which are in an area near Chebarkul Lake, west of Chelyabinsk. The third site was found some 80 kilometers further to the northwest, near the town of Zlatoust.



Crazy. I spent a month in these two particular cities. I also spent time in Port-au-Prince just before it was shook up.

Gotta stay home!



Zlatoust is an intersting place. Every day people would be hung somewhere interesting, from the top of the ferris wheel stood out the most to me. They also have a big military weapons factory there that they tried to keep a secret until the late 90's. The whole city had just one lonely highway leading to it - really creepy place overall!
hb81

climber
Feb 16, 2013 - 04:46am PT
Can someone explain the physics of why such an object would "detonate" so violently that windows and solid doors blow out on earth? Why doesn't it just fall apart?
Was the shock wave from entering the atmosphere or from impact?
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Feb 16, 2013 - 05:01am PT
The shock wave was more like the wave coming off the bow of a speeding boat. A boat going 30kilometers/second.

As long as there is atmosphere, so once it does enter the atmosphere, there is matter (atmosphere) to displace. The displacement creates a wave that travels at the speed of sound.

Hitting the ground at that speed made a boom too.

So the windows that were broken would be in a shape similar to a lollipop. The handle/stick part is the result of the travel through the air, the candy on the end part the result of coming to a quick stop on the ground.

Once the stone broke up (similar to the space shuttle when it lost it's tiles) the pieces started acting independently and burning up at different rates because they were different sizes.

The object didn't fall and then explode like a bomb. It the friction between it and air got more intense as it got down into thicker air, which meant it burned up mostly before hitting the ground. Notice how all the news reports are of the estimated mass before entering the atmosphere. Most of that burned off before hitting the ground. The energy dispersed during this process in sound was what broke the windows. Kinda like the energy dispersed while you burn a campfire is mostly radiating heat, some light, and very little crackling sound. This was a lot of light, a lot of heat, and a lot of sound!
hb81

climber
Feb 16, 2013 - 05:28am PT
Hey, thanks for the explanation.

From another post:

Estimated at about 10 tons, and about 2 meters across,

So this was just a tiny boulder that did all that damage... imagine something 20 meters across or even larger... pretty scary stuff.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Feb 16, 2013 - 10:46am PT
I've read about nuclear weapons design and testing. One of the main things that they measure is the pressure of the shockwave. I was amazed at how low the pressure was to blow a building to shreds. I think that it was less than 10 psia.

When some of us old bastards were kids, the military used to send sonic booms down over the country pretty regularly. A sonic boom can shatter windows, too. That is a ten ton or so jet going 1000mph. This was a ten ton object doing 30km per second.

Somebody else do the math, and I'm sure that that isn't the best answer..but it is close.

The meteroite also had a very shallow trajectory. It didn't come straight down. It was at a shallow angle.
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Feb 16, 2013 - 11:47am PT
More information has been gathered and this thing was pretty damn big. Not only was energy released from breaking the sound barrier it also exploded. Fortunately it was quite high when it did so or it could have flattened a city. Not just a few roofs, doors and windows. It was about 1/3 the diameter of the one that passed by a few hours later.

NASA http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/asteroids/news/asteroid20130215.html

The estimated size of the object, prior to entering Earth's atmosphere, has been revised upward from 49 feet (15 meters) to 55 feet (17 meters), and its estimated mass has increased from 7,000 to 10,000 tons. Also, the estimate for energy released during the event has increased by 30 kilotons to nearly 500 kilotons of energy released.

---


That's the energy of a pretty decent H-Bomb fortunately without the radioactive fallout.
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
-A race of corn eaters
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:23pm PT
The data, right now, still seems all over the place. e.g., from 10T to 70,000 T. Quite a range there.

.....

According to the Planetary Society (yeah, I'm a member) ... The Russian meteor was not detected from Earth because it came from the daylight side (i.e. from the sun's direction). Seems like a gap to fill.**



** A 3-6 month blind spot (for earth bound teles). On top of everything else.

.....

A remaining question I have is why did this meteor come in at such a very shallow angle (relative to our atmosphere, almost skipping along it, which is veneer thin)? Coincidence?

We could call it... The Russian Tangent. Or perhaps better, the Chelyabinsk Tangent. :)

QT What per cent drop in on a tangent? Less than 1 per cent? Less than .1 per cent? (Review the most pop Russian video. It's pretty clear I think that this meteor threaded our veneer thin atmosphere in a very tangential angle.)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:36pm PT
And in answer to my wife's question of why so many meteorites seem to hit
Russia I was like "Duh, it's because they deserve it!"
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:37pm PT
What's the largest nation, by size, in the world?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:41pm PT
1.8 times the size of the USA.
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:42pm PT
It is normal for initial reports of something like this to be of very mixed accuracy.

It is also normal as time goes on for the experts to dial in much more accurately.

If you want good information about any subject look to the experts. The various space and defence agencies are generally reliable and tend to not only give the best analysis they will usually let you know how certain they are of their information.

Currently what I posted is the best info I could find and the adjustments being made are getting smaller ie accuracy is getting dialed in pretty close now.
-


A little geometry will show that if randomly shooting at spherical object with tiny bullets you are much less likely to get a perpendicular trajectory than a low angled one. Add in the effect of gravity to guide objects that would otherwise miss into glancing blow trajectories and the liklyhood of low angle hits gets even higher.


SO basically if a meteorite is going to hit a nation on earth it is most likely to hit Russia at fairly low angle. Funny enough that's exactly what happened.
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 16, 2013 - 12:47pm PT
A remaining question I have is why did this meteor come in at such a very shallow angle (relative to our atmosphere, almost skipping along it, which is veneer thin)? Coincidence?

I think most these objects get pulled into the Earth, as opposed to falling straight into it, so it's kinda falling out of orbit. Some meteors even skip on the atmosphere, complete another Earth orbit and then finally crash to the ground.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:47pm PT
1.8 times the size of the USA.

Mine was a tongue in cheek question.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:49pm PT
I just figured you wanted the exact number. ;-)
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
-A race of corn eaters
Feb 16, 2013 - 12:55pm PT
Yeah, that's interesting. I hope the experts get around to talking about this somewhere. Who's to say this Russian meteor wasn't captured by earth and was for some time in an earth orbit instead of a solar orbit? Then an earth orbit decay would explain the "veneer-approach" entry. Right?

For reference, a geostationary orbit equates to an orbital velocity of about 2 miles / sec. (So this meteor's speed was in the ball park.)
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Feb 16, 2013 - 01:00pm PT
Hey, Reilly, can we get the story on that rockfall photo?
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Feb 16, 2013 - 01:00pm PT
I'm sure some folks are gathering the data and trying to backtrack the path of the Russian meteorite. Be interesting if they can get enough accurate info to do the job with a good level of certainty.


now on to the most interesting thing I noticed in the NASA statement.

These new estimates were generated using new data that had been collected by five additional infrasound stations located around the world

Infrasound stations? hmmm time for google.

----

EDIT

Infrasound monitoring stations, Very cool stuff.

http://www.ctbto.org/verification-regime/monitoring-technologies-how-they-work/infrasound-monitoring/
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 16, 2013 - 01:02pm PT
Keep in mind, even though some of these objects run into the Earth, it's usually the Earth running into them...and winning!
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Feb 16, 2013 - 01:04pm PT
" Because they deserve it.." More proof why men are smarter than women and why the Pope will never be a woman...
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
-A race of corn eaters
Feb 16, 2013 - 01:09pm PT
For perspective, I thought some of you might enjoy this pic of geostationary satellites...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geostationary_orbit


.....

eeyonkee,

Speaking of the Gods, what compassion and foresight on their part!! to give the Earth the exact spin and density needed so Their children could one day have geostationary sats at 22k miles to broadcast our social media around the world. Hallelujah! Imagine the opposite: no rotation, then no geostationary ability. Oh the horror! :)
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Feb 16, 2013 - 01:41pm PT
Most people have never heard of the National Reconnaissance Office. They are the ones who handle launching and operating spy satellites. In this time when the cold war is over, I wonder why we keep spending so much money on this. Their budget is huge, a big chunk of the Defense Budget.

I would be shocked if this was not observed by the flock of spy satellites or ground based radar defense system in Russia.

Like all of this good submarine data, this data will probably not see the light of day. If it had happened over the U.S., the data would never be released. Russia might, though. They are actually far more open than we are on some topics now.

This was very cool, though. Never has one happened right over a big city, and debris analysis will provide a lot of super good data.

A lot of tornado strenght analysis comes from after the fact. I know a guy who is a famous structural engineer and has a company that does this research. He can tell a lot from debris and how it damages structural and construction methods.

I'm happy that the Russian's didn't think that this was a nuke strike. I assume that on radar they saw that it was moving too fast to be a warhead.

I need to catch up on the new info today.

I can show you some really cool subsurface astroblemes. They happen and either erode or get covered with sediment. There are a few famous ones that are preserved at great depth and are visible in petroleum subsurface data.

HFCS..a member of the planetary society? What do you do for a living? I thought that I was a Nerd, but I am not in the top ten on ST.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Feb 16, 2013 - 01:46pm PT
Yeah, that's interesting. I hope the experts get around to talking about this somewhere. Who's to say this Russian meteor wasn't captured by earth and was for some time in an earth orbit instead of a solar orbit? Then an earth orbit decay would explain the "veneer-approach" entry. Right?

I'm sure that this data is being crunched at this time, and probably was roughly known within 18 hours of the event.

The asteroid that just missed us is not a further risk. The close approach to Earth has tossed it out into a wild orbit.

I can't wait for the comet that is coming. It might be a big event as it gets close to the sun. It won't be visible for many months like Hale-Bopp was, but it is a sun grazer, and a big one at that.
Norwegian

Trad climber
Pollock Pines, California
Feb 16, 2013 - 03:20pm PT
someone should put a codom
on god, these erratic
money shots splating the good
folks in russia
seems like sloppy reproducineering.
Anastasia

climber
Home
Feb 16, 2013 - 05:06pm PT

I couldn't resist...

LilaBiene

Trad climber
Feb 16, 2013 - 05:56pm PT
This is probably in bad taste, but...

So I just caught the video about the sonic boom, and asked the hubby what the guy exclaimed when he heard it...my husband replied that he didn't know, he wasn't listening. So I repeated what he said (completely missing the subtlety of the exchange), and he looked away, then laughed (like what I thought was, hoo hoo, that's funny, you're trying to imitate something you just heard in Russian) and so I said it again...at which point my husband told me not to say it (blushing, I think) and put his fingers to his lips, nodding towards the muppet.

Oops. Bad mama. Still don't know what he said, but I guess I shouldn't repeat it in polite company...too funny.

rrider

climber
Mckinleyville, Ca
Feb 16, 2013 - 06:38pm PT
"Cloudy with a chance of meateorites..."

Was curious to know the altitude at which the Russian meteorite traveled and disintegrated.
monolith

climber
SF bay area
Feb 16, 2013 - 06:51pm PT
dashcam catch meteorite in US too.

http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/Bright-streak-of-light-reported-over-Calif-4284310.php
B_E_S

climber
Feb 16, 2013 - 07:07pm PT
I read a estimate that it exploded 30-40 miles above earth
and it was probably iron and about 40' wide at the time.
It read as it never hit the earth and it's unknown how much did
after explosion.

Apparently it was a small one probably about the size of the 1
in 1953 that leveled numerous trees also in Russia in a forest
area.

It seemed the ones they are concerned about are about 3/5 of a mile
wide and larger and hit about every 1200 years. Maybe what causes tidal
shifts and ice ages and or undoes ice ages due to polar changes.
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
Feb 16, 2013 - 07:59pm PT
Yeah those are the really bad ones.. but still if this thing had come in at a steeper angle and exploded at a lower altitude it could have leveled that small city instead of the relatively minor damage that did occur.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Feb 16, 2013 - 08:44pm PT
Seems like there are a thousand or so glass shard imbedded examples of why the advice given to Lot's wife a few thousand years ago is still best heeded;



See a bright flash in the sky,


Don't look back!

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324616604578308010408524202.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_LEFTTopStories
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Feb 17, 2013 - 12:53pm PT
Putan
Putan
Credit: TomCochrane

Russian Fireball Highlights Asteroid Threat, Lawmaker Says

http://www.space.com/19833-russia-meteor-asteroid-threat.html
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 17, 2013 - 03:27pm PT

^^^

Fuking A!!!...

LMAO!!!...
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
-A race of corn eaters
Feb 17, 2013 - 10:43pm PT
Russian scientists say the meteor weighed about 10 tonnes before it entered the Earth's atmosphere, travelling at some 30km (19 miles) per second, before breaking apart 30-50km (20-30 miles) above ground.

However, the US space agency Nasa said the meteor was 17m (55ft) wide and weighed 10,000 tonnes before entering the atmosphere, releasing about 500 kilotons of energy. The atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945 was 12-15 kilotons.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-21494963


Amazing discrepancy. Just three magnitudes difference.
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2013 - 01:44am PT
"Here is what we know so far," says Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. "The asteroid was about 17 meters in diameter and weighed approximately 10,000 metric tons. It struck Earth's atmosphere at 40,000 mph (18 km/s) and broke apart about 12 to 15 miles (20 to 25 km) above Earth's surface. The energy of the resulting explosion was in the vicinity of 500 kilotons of TNT."
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 19, 2013 - 11:56am PT
Credit: Meme GOP
YosemiteSteve

Trad climber
CA
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 19, 2013 - 12:32pm PT
Credit: YosemiteSteve

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Russia_asteroid_impact_ESA_update_and_assessment
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
bouldering
Feb 23, 2013 - 12:50pm PT
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Meteorite-Chelyabinsk-Russia-/121070481909?_trksid=p2047675.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D11%26meid%3D5801390071419013822%26pid%3D100011%26prg%3D1005%26rk%3D3%26sd%3D111013565868%26
Klimmer

Mountain climber
Aug 14, 2013 - 04:07pm PT
Russian meteor may have gangmates in tow

Orbital estimates pinpoint 20 asteroids on similar
paths to rock that exploded near Chelyabinsk.

By Maggie McKee
Nature
02 August 2013
http://www.nature.com/news/russian-meteor-may-have-gangmates-in-tow-1.13498



They decided to tackle the problem with brute computational force, running simulations of billions of possible orbits to find the ones most likely to have led to a collision. They then used the average of the ten best orbits to search a NASA asteroid catalogue for known objects on similar paths. They found about 20, ranging in size from 5 to 200 metres across, they report in an article to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters1.

......


The best sibling candidate, for instance, is a 200-metre-wide asteroid known as 2011 EO40, whose orbit was calculated from observations taken over just 34 days. That is too short a time to be able to pinpoint its position in the future, says Jon Giorgini, a senior analyst in the Solar System Dynamics Group at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. For that, researchers would need observations taken over the asteroid's two-year orbit, he says.


.........


The only way to prove a connection would be to collect samples from one of the proposed family members and compare them with meteorites collected from the Chelyabinsk region, says Carlos de la Fuente Marcos. However, a cheaper way to find out whether the suspected siblings have at least a passing resemblance could be to measure their composition from their light spectra.


Chelyabinsk meteoroid -----> meteor -----> meteorite, was estimated to be 18.0m in diameter as it entered into Earth's atmosphere before fragmenting above Russia.


This could be a possible uh, oh ...


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