Your Favorite Pack........Post it up and tell us why.

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Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 6, 2013 - 07:05pm PT
An older pack with few amenities but it's been to some pretty special places with me. Lots of great memories....given to me by a friend.

As a matter of fact just got back from a hike this afternoon with grandson, Levi and this is the pack we took. It's my main day/hike pack. Cheers, Lynne

Credit: LL LL


Pack Model :DD She'll be ready to go out on the longer hikes soon.
Pack Model :DD She'll be ready to go out on the longer hikes soon.
Credit: LL LL
MisterE

Social climber
Feb 6, 2013 - 07:14pm PT
Arc-teryx Miura 50.

Tons of room, super comfortable even with heavy loads, side access to the deep stuff, narrow at the hips for the tight squeezes, well-balanced, bomber material and great warranty. The redesigned 2012 has even more room in the pockets, as well.



T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Feb 6, 2013 - 07:17pm PT
Fav. climbing/alpine pack
70's wilderness experience
Mid 70's Wilderness Experience Pack
Mid 70's Wilderness Experience Pack
Credit: T Hocking
Wilderness Experience <br/>
Chatsworth,Ca. <br/>
pack label, mid 70's
Wilderness Experience
Chatsworth,Ca.
pack label, mid 70's
Credit: T Hocking
Fav. Backpack,
always been a Kelty guy
BITD a Tioga ext. frame
Now a Redcloud int. frame
No pics handy.
Tad
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Feb 6, 2013 - 07:18pm PT
The Miura 50 is great.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Feb 6, 2013 - 07:40pm PT
Six pack of Founders Centenial Ale...Tastes great...Less filling....
Rankin

Social climber
Greensboro, North Carolina
Feb 6, 2013 - 07:47pm PT
Arc-Teryx Muira 50

+1

Holds a rope, rack, and all the fixins' (including a helmet). Rides like a dream and is smartly laid out.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 6, 2013 - 07:54pm PT
T. Hocking,

Here's a 70's Chouinard climbing pack of my husband, Dan's. It's still very functional and it's a keeper. Let a few family members use it once it awhile to keep the spirit alive. :D


Credit: LL LL


Ihateplastic

Trad climber
It ain't El Cap, Oregon
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:01pm PT
Not my pack (mine was the original orange) but this is the pack I would pay top dollar to have back. A Karrimor Willan's Pack. Uncomfortable as hell, not waterproof, carried like crap but I dragged mine up hundreds of routes in plenty of places and it still hung in there. Canvas, FELT lined shoulder straps, no internal padding or framework. Overall a piece of crap but it was the best piece of crap I ever owned. And then one day... it was gone. Still don't know where...

Anyone have one they want to sell???

Credit: Ihateplastic

Again, someone else but the color looks right.
Credit: Ihateplastic

Credit: Ihateplastic
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:03pm PT
^^^
Cool one LL LL
Quality gear should last a lifetime with some care.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 6, 2013 - 08:07pm PT
T Hocking, I so agree. Sometimes a zipper repair is needed and I've had great results from the Outfitters store around the corner from Nomad Ventures in JTree. They do great work for reasonable prices.

Mr. E, you have some great taste in packs going for you there. Arcteryx is kinda like the Porche, expensive but beautifully engineered and the performance is superb.
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:25pm PT
My favorite pack is any type as long as someone else is carrying it
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 6, 2013 - 08:29pm PT
And how do you accomplish that, AP? Do you have some magic potion?
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:32pm PT
My favorite pack is;
The Red Marlboro Pack I got with Marlboro miles back in 93.
I'm still using it to this day. It's been drug, thrashed, abused,
and it still in good condition. It's been a workhorse thru the years.

weezy

climber
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:32pm PT
Ihateplastic

Trad climber
It ain't El Cap, Oregon
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:36pm PT
^^ knew that was coming!^^
Onewhowalksonrocks

Mountain climber
portland, Maine
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:39pm PT
My all time favorite pack was made by a friend Rich Lake. Many of you know him as pack maker to the stars. The pack was taken.
MisterE

Social climber
Feb 6, 2013 - 08:44pm PT
Damn it Weezy! FTW.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Feb 6, 2013 - 11:45pm PT
My first crag pack was a Arcteryx Bora 30 I got in Mong Kok in HK in the late 90's. Just the right size to not let me take too much crap. Took many a beating. Still in garage and still smells like the seas of Hong Kong (not sure if that's a good thing!). Many good years out of that pack.

My new pack is, for me, a work of art: Cold, Cold World Ozone. Super well made, super heavy duty. Simple with only features I want nothing extra. Now I gotta get out more and use the thing!

Eric
QITNL

climber
Feb 7, 2013 - 12:20am PT
Arcteryx Needle 65 for me or

My aunt went to school with Dino.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Feb 7, 2013 - 12:33am PT
I have like 18 packs and I use all of them...haha.

I have a Tatonka day pack that I picked up in Germany that is my go-to day pack, it's been good to me.

These days, I usually always hike with my SAR pack on for training. It's a Coaxsher SR-1 Endeavor, nice system.
SofCookay

climber
Feb 7, 2013 - 07:03am PT
My new ULA Circuit pack in Barney purple, of course. It'll be coming on the PCT with me this year.

Credit: SofCookay
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Feb 7, 2013 - 07:24am PT
I've been looking and looking for a red canvas ruck sac with a leather bottom and leather straps like the one pictured on this thread. Love to know where I might buy one! Anyone know?
Bill Mc Kirgan

Trad climber
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Feb 7, 2013 - 07:29am PT
LL LL,

Those are some special packs indeed. I understand how they've acquired special meaning and bring the memories back. Memories of adventure and discovery. That's beautiful.




Uncomfortable as hell, not waterproof, carried like crap ...

-- ihateplastic



^^^^ Agreed: Creature comforts are not THE defining characteristics of my 'favorite pack' either. Or is it a haul baggie? Pack, day pack, haul baggie, piglet, whateva...I've had no buyer's remorse with this one.



I'm a FISH addict and absolutely adore the simplicity and functionality of the Atom Smasher (Deluxe), pictured above fresh out-of-the-box the day I received it.

I looked like an absolute n00b the first month I used it, and, well...I was.

Piglet
Piglet
Credit: Bill Mc Kirgan

I quickly learned that if I load it with soft goods on the shoulder strap side I could protect my back and ribs and be comfortable hiking and scrambling with it fully loaded. Sometimes I use a runner to make a chest strap to keep the shoulder straps from spreading for long hikes.

If I load the thing in a hasty way, as I often do when our party moves to another route, I typically discover something jabbing into my back and then adjust the padded shoulder straps...sometimes just loosen it up and let the pack lie backwards hanging off the waste belt. If that doesn't help then I stop and take a little time to fix it.

Credit: Bill Mc Kirgan

After a few years of light use my Atom Smasher is starting to develop some character.

Bill Mc Kirgan taking Paul for a climb
Bill Mc Kirgan taking Paul for a climb
Credit: Bill Mc Kirgan

When I visited Devils Tower I was not too surprised to see this is the preferred pack of Frank Sanders (pictured below).

Credit: Bill Mc Kirgan

Look's like this one got sick and vomited gear and clothing. Poor piglet.

Credit: Bill Mc Kirgan

When I asked Mr. Sanders how long he's had his heavily worn-out-looking-wreckage of an Atom Smasher, he chuckled and said only a year or so. Said he was hoping to score a few more that summer so he would have a reserve supply.

I'm starting to see the wounds on mine now and plan on learning how to sew and mend this thing because as ugly-looking and uncomfortable as it can be it is my go-to pack for any adventure.









Of course the ASD has nothing on the Flextrek Whipsnake upthread...that unit rocks.
WyoRockMan

Trad climber
Flank of the Bighorns
Feb 7, 2013 - 07:51am PT
Last summer I was walking through the forest and sat down in a group of white bark pines to wait out a hopefully short rain shower. Reaching into my pack to grab some water and a snack and a map and some bug juice, it occurred to me that I LOVE MY PACK.

I think I bought it in 1987, I remember saving up for it. It may have been one of my first “big” purchases. I poured through brochures, walked around all the stores, tried them all on, it was, as Joe Biden put it, “A BIG fvcking deal!” It was one of the first times I made a conscious effort to buy local. A great number of my friends would wind up building them, certainly a prolific if not preferred employer in “6” county Montana.

Hikes to the ridge, up the Gallatin canyon, a winter trip to the Sphinx, Ross Peak, Crazy Peak, a failed attempt at Mt. Moran, across Froze-to-Death Plateau, up the Ramp, down the Smith River, the Great One, Flatirons, Yosemite, Bow Glacier… None of these places are overly crazy or extreme, just enough for the occasional dose of “The Fear”. Sometimes you need an ice axe, sometimes a shovel, maybe a rock hammer or skis, but always a pack.

20+ years of varied use and the pack is still living up to it’s no fail policy. I know this is starting to sound like a sales pitch, but it is too late for that. You can’t get this pack anymore, its not for sale. I’m sure there are lighter, higher tech, superman packs out there, but this one is simple, reliable and made at home. Thanks for the memories and here’s to many more my friend.

Bomb Pack
Bomb Pack
Credit: WyoRockMan
hossjulia

Trad climber
Where the Hoback and the mighty Snake River meet
Feb 7, 2013 - 07:51am PT
Credit: hossjulia

The pack on my back! This old Camp Trails pack (Campmor) is a smallish women's specific that weighs 3 pounds. Carry's great, I think it was made to fit bear cans. I carried an average of 40 pounds with it on the JMT and it was maxed out. Could not have fit much else in it.

I need to replace it and shudder at what I'll need to spend, this one cost me $60 new about a dozen years ago.
David Knopp

Trad climber
CA
Feb 7, 2013 - 12:42pm PT
http://www.coldcoldworldpacks.com/chernobyl.htm
best.pack.ever.
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Feb 7, 2013 - 01:11pm PT
SofCookay, spot on! I love my ULA. Carried it 240 miles on the JMT (we did some extra)and it's a great pack. Light, comfortable rugged. Have a couple of friends who carried ULA on a PCT thruhike, the pack finished with barely any wear.

And I have friends who swear by Cold Cold World. I'll have to try one.
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Feb 7, 2013 - 02:10pm PT
Backcountry touring and snow camping...a love affair.
Backcountry touring and snow camping...a love affair.
Credit: SCseagoat

This pack, because it holds alot and rides well when on skis in the back country. Well holding alot is probably not a good thing because then I take more. But I've gotten so many winters out of this pack. At my age I will probably never have to give it up.

Susan
TwistedCrank

climber
Dingleberry Gulch, Ideeho
Feb 7, 2013 - 02:23pm PT
A Lowe somethingerrather.

Can't recall the model name, it's a 2nd or 3rd generation Lowe. One of the first with plastic buckles. I won pretty big at a poker game and the next day I went into a boutique gear store, slapped a wad of bills on the counter and said "I want that one".

The next day I pawned my old Kelty frame pack for about 15 bucks.

I lived out of that thing for a few years. Since gaining modern maturity, I've rediscovered joys backpacking, approach humping, and wallowing more than a few times under that pack.

It's got a big old stain on the back from "the Parkay incident".

Last year my wife offered up our IRS refund for a new super light, ultra big, all space-age materialed, neon polychrome uberpack. I said NFW, I want to be buried in that Lowe when I die.

Credit: TwistedCrank
Capt.

climber
some eastside hovel
Feb 7, 2013 - 02:31pm PT
WyoRockMan-That's awesome!!That is kind of mutt tho,yeah??Old school Bomb lid.Nice!
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Feb 7, 2013 - 06:59pm PT
A really heavy one that i can get someone to carry for me.
TrundleBum

Trad climber
Las Vegas
Feb 7, 2013 - 07:36pm PT

BITD I had a 'Chuck Roast, Alpine sack' that I loved to death.
(Any body remember Chuck Roast' gear?)

Presently I most often schlep my schwag to the crag in a Fish 'Atom Smasher' that is now about in the same condition as the one shown upthread.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 7, 2013 - 08:45pm PT
Just got home from work.....selling packs among other things:D

LOVE all your pack stories. That's what I was hoping for.

I'm a newbie recreated into a second life in the outdoors. As I get ready for an adventure it seems my pack senses my vibes..... my thoughts and plans and hopes and trepidation's. It also counsels me to pack healthy snacks and my headlamp. That's the purple pack.

Oh man, what a pack :D

Now I have a new friend.


My latest pack, a Gregory. This coming summer working in the Eastern S...
My latest pack, a Gregory. This coming summer working in the Eastern Sierra I hope to finally begin packing into the beauty I have been entranced with the past several years.
Credit: LL LL
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Feb 7, 2013 - 08:56pm PT
CMy atomsmasher is my go to pack as well. I was there at its birth.
Like any parent I have photos of its gestation and birth. To be dug out presently.

I liked my chouinard ultima Thule mostly for the name.

I have other favorite packs.... Off to the archives......
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 7, 2013 - 09:07pm PT
Jaybro Dude,

Get those archive's rolling. Miss you Dude and hope life is well. Will you be able to make it to Tuolumne this summer? If so we must get some of us together and christen lynnie climbing with yo the majors. Cheers, hugs and Peace

SC seagoat, awesome pic.

Sofcooky, we sell the ULA. I'd love to know what you think about it and why you chose the Circuit. What size did you get? Blessing to you on your grand adventure.


Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 7, 2013 - 09:10pm PT
My old Sac Millet- untold summits in the Cascades. With the attached pockets it even served on quite a few winter multi-day trips. Hard to believe, but true. Zero padding, no suspension system, inch and a half wide straps; no pain-no gain, right?
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 7, 2013 - 09:13pm PT
Reilly, true.... some of the best loved have no padding, no suspension. They've been used for years before all the specialized stuff came out. Think the hip suspension for gals is a good thing....we will see when I test my Gregory in a couple weeks.


Julia and QITNL, great pics of packs and rat packs...smiles and good evening.
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Feb 8, 2013 - 05:29am PT
My favorite pack is the On Rope 1 cave pack. It is very well made, and the removable straps can be rearranged so as to carry the pack in any configuration that you want: over both shoulder, over one shoulder, in front, a hydrid (one strap diagonally around the shoulder and the other strap around the waist, shown here), or even the straps wrapped around your ankle (so you can drag the pack while you crawl).

Sierra Ledge Rat in Friar's Hole
Sierra Ledge Rat in Friar's Hole
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

This photo was taken during a 12-hour trip in Friar's Hole to see the 2nd highest waterfall in West Virginia.
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Feb 8, 2013 - 05:51am PT
I haven't worn any of the newer model packs but bitd this thing was the shizz, a Gregory Big Wally. My favorite crag pack by far.
Big Wally
Big Wally
Credit: can't say
Credit: can't say
Credit: can't say
SofCookay

climber
Feb 8, 2013 - 07:18am PT
Lynne, I know Nomad sells the ULA pack because I work at Nomad's (occasionally) in Joshua Tree. I don't know if you remember, but we met at this last Facelift. I left that Friday before all the partays kicked off (not one for big crowds). Anyway, I got that pack from the Nomad's in Idylwild and I chose it specifically for its functionality, durability, and weight (2 lbs 7 oz). The awesome purple color was just a bonus.
GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Feb 8, 2013 - 07:26am PT
The Red Marlboro Pack I got with Marlboro miles back in 93

Funny thing about that year and that pack... because in 1993 I was starting public school at Beaumont elementary, and one of my very first days of public school EVER was a program put on by D.A.R.E. against Tobacco use.

The guy from D.A.R.E. talked about how the big tobacco companies use catalogs to get kids to buy toys and sh#t, when obviously no grown man is going to use a Marlboro Backpack [sic] or a pogo stick or some such other trinket you could get with 100 proofs of purchase.

A classmate then produced the catalog from inside his desk, with a big red back pack all circled. He said his dad had been collecting them for him so he could have it.

We talked about Marijuana after that.


Funny world, ain't it? And that was 1993.

Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 8, 2013 - 09:50am PT
Sofcookay, I do remember and I left early also. Wanted to spend some time on Northern CA's coast line and Sonoma. I forgot you worked at Nomad's.

Sierra Ledge Rat.....Is that FUN????? Yikes is all I can say!!!!!! lynne
AlanDoak

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Feb 11, 2013 - 02:58pm PT
It looks like I'm not the only one who is a fan of the the Big Wally by Gregory. I loved mine so much, I wish Gregory would bring it back. I would post pictures of mine, but it got stolen by a bear near the base of Washington's Column. Luckily the car keys fell out before he vanished with it.

It was an awesome crag pack, and great tag bag.

Things I loved about it:
Comfy suspension
Big opening for stuffing gear into it
Speedy conversion to haul mode
Durable (mine was the vinyl version)
big flap pocket
darkmagus

Mountain climber
San Diego, CA
Feb 11, 2013 - 04:03pm PT
I've been using the Deuter Aircontact 65+10 for a couple of seasons...my thoughts:

-Kinda on the heavy side, but very cushiony straps. Super comfortable when properly adjusted.
-SUPER easy to adjust.
-Somewhat narrow profile.
-The (optional) sleeping bag compartment can even fit a couple extra articles of clothing
throwpie

Trad climber
Berkeley
Feb 11, 2013 - 04:38pm PT
My Millet Sack
Credit: throwpie
F10

Trad climber
Bishop
Feb 11, 2013 - 07:19pm PT
"can't say" nailed it


Gregory Big Wally, great rock pack
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Feb 11, 2013 - 07:45pm PT
Birth of an atomsmasher
Credit: Jaybro
Credit: Jaybro
Credit: Jaybro
Credit: Jaybro
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 11, 2013 - 07:50pm PT
Jaybro, missing yo......life and work good?
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Feb 11, 2013 - 07:54pm PT
Probably my most nostalgic would be my old Trapper Nelson which was state of the art in the 50s.
You've come a long way baby.
Credit: guido
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Feb 11, 2013 - 07:55pm PT
Life and work are excellent Lynne and you?
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Feb 11, 2013 - 08:01pm PT

WyoRockMan

I have an exact model of that Bomb pack. It's worn and I don't wear it
much these days, but the adventures I had with it.
I had an old Karrimor sac that did carry like hell, and nearly
nothing. . .
and have been using a BD Shadow these days--carries wonderfully
and is light. . .
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 11, 2013 - 08:44pm PT
Jaybro, life and work are good here too. Hugs

PACK STORY:

After Dan went to heaven and I decided to honor him by following his past path of climbing welllll....The Mayor of JTree, Todd Gordon, invited me on my first official climb in about 20+++ years.

I'd never been to Suicide Rock, Idyllwild, CA tho Dan boy climbed there a bunch. But that's where I met Gordo and two others I would climb with that day. One of them being Tucker Tech.

I'd taken a few lessons in the gym to refresh what I'd watched others do for so many years and made it up Surprise and had a blast.

This Tucker person carried a huge pack and throughout the day endless beers appeared from it. I asked him for one and immediately knew I'd asked the wrong question. But TT was a gentleman and surrendered one of his closely guarded cans. I didn't ask for another. Great day ended and we found our way slowly down the hill. Tucker was way ahead. I was last .... no surprise.

At the bottom of the descent I saw Tucker Tech sitting on a big rock seemingly unable to get up. Oh, God, I thought. He's having a heart attack.
(I didn't know this man or that would have been my last thought.) I hurried up and asked him what was wrong and could I help.

Tucker, bless him, looked at me as only he could and calmly said ...."well, I have a 50 pound boulder in my pack and I'm having a little trouble getting up." I pushed from behind and TT was good to go. He kinda overwhelmed me (read scared). But I asked him why he was carrying a 50 lb. boulder back to the car. He explained about his cactus garden and rock walls.

We've been good friends ever since. What a guy. What a pack.....:D
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Feb 11, 2013 - 09:01pm PT
Nice cave pic, SLR. I used a surplus army medic's bag for caving. Rugged and easy to drag behind in a crawlway.

I am shocked to discover you are an electric caver. I figured you for a real man, a carbide man.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 11, 2013 - 09:25pm PT
Bro Bob and Lynnie .... pretty certain Eastern Sierra
Bro Bob and Lynnie .... pretty certain Eastern Sierra
Credit: LL LL


So here's a very vecchio, old pack. My first at age 15. Smiles. lynne
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 18, 2013 - 09:47pm PT
Early, sweet morning and the beginning of adventure.
Early, sweet morning and the beginning of adventure.
Credit: LL LL

An adventure "a few years later". :D





Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 18, 2013 - 09:55pm PT
Here's my home this past weekend. Pretty beautiful. An antique ground ...
Here's my home this past weekend. Pretty beautiful. An antique ground pad and my new favorite backpack. Anza Borrego
Credit: LL LL





Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 18, 2013 - 10:08pm PT
Bunch of boulders out there. I tried one with a good vertical crack. G...
Bunch of boulders out there. I tried one with a good vertical crack. Grainy cause none of these have been climbed, but it was fun.
Credit: LL LL









BruceAnderson

Social climber
Los Angeles currently St. Antonin, France
Feb 21, 2013 - 06:34am PT
Here's likely the last cragging pack I'll ever own
Cold Cold World Ozone
Credit: BruceAnderson
No frills, handmade in the U.S., and near perfect. I can fit everything I need for a day out. If it lasts anything like the pack below it will be the last one I buy.
Credit: BruceAnderson
BruceAnderson

Social climber
Los Angeles currently St. Antonin, France
Feb 21, 2013 - 06:43am PT
I use to use a Fish Atom Smasher in my earlier climbing life and became convinced that for rock climbing the simplest bomber sack with two padded straps was the way to go.
Mid nineties, after a trip to Mallorca, Hidetaka Suzuki gave my wife this pack-
Credit: BruceAnderson
It belonged to his wife (r.i.p.) and was her alpine summit pack. Then he used it for quite a while as his crag pack, and now my wife still uses it at least a couple times a week. It has a hole in the top lid but only because my golden retriever went after some saucisson stashed inside.
This pack was what made me search out the Cold Cold World.
BruceAnderson

Social climber
Los Angeles currently St. Antonin, France
Feb 21, 2013 - 06:52am PT
Finally a nod to the best little daypack ever, the Black Diamond Bullet.
Once again bomber materials, simple sack, two straps. Whats cool about this thing is it holds a ton more than you would think but disappears on your back. Pretty much kills all the other fancy hydration packs I've used.
Credit: BruceAnderson
all three side by side
Credit: BruceAnderson
martygarrison

Trad climber
Washington DC
Feb 21, 2013 - 07:44am PT
For climbing and approaches I always like this puppy.

Mountain Tools - Jet Pack
Mountain Tools - Jet Pack
Credit: martygarrison

Carried a full rack and a rope no problem. Tough and you can haul it if need be.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Feb 21, 2013 - 09:09am PT
Arc-Teryx Muira 50

+ Another.

Mister E is the reason I have one. We all pitched in and got one for the Doc. Then E said "hey, this pack is awesome" and bought one for himself. Then we went cragging one day and I got a thorough look at his along with positive testimony. So I got one shortly after.

That was about 4 years ago. Best pack I've had.


Second place: BD Bullet. Perfect size, great design, reasonably priced. Whether wearing on routes, or just stuffing my shoes/snacks/etc in and tossing inside my crashpad, I use this one all the time.

Third: Original Dana Designs Terraplane. Heavy, but if I have to carry a lot of stuff, and/or heavy stuff, this thing is a Cadillac. The bag itself is a very simple, but perfect thought out design. Suspension works great. Very well built.
The Wedge

Boulder climber
Santa Rosa & Bishop, CA
Feb 21, 2013 - 10:07am PT
http://www.coldcoldworldpacks.com/


Light, streamline, insert works as a sleeping pad
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Feb 21, 2013 - 10:09am PT
Mine was an ancient "Wilderness exerience" design, that had an ALL leather bottom to one third of it.. One of the first internal frame designs. That was one tough pack, and it had over twenty years of punishment before the demise.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Feb 21, 2013 - 10:47am PT
Some really cool stuff here!

I'll reiterate my enchantment with the Cold Cold World Ozone for cragging. Finally did get out and use it this past weekend and the love abides.

I've long used a Lowe Contour iV (from about 1992-93) for backpacking. As Colin Fletcher would say, it's a "great bloody sack." Not a lot a frills, but space galore and comfy. 6,000+ cubic inches. Norman Clyde would be proud (though probably a bit small for him!). The pads are all worn out and I replaced it with a CiloGear 45L WorkSack for alpine climbing. It feels like a feather by comparison and will help keep me from bring the kitchen sink on those kinds of trips. I hope!

But for backpacking (especially where you're carrying all the kids stuff) that Lowe is the best. Thinking of getting it refurbed by that guy in, I think, Blue Canyon CA, who does that stuff. Anyone recall his contact info off the top of your head?

I have a boat load of other packs, but those are my faves.

Eric
RDB

Social climber
wa
Feb 21, 2013 - 11:22am PT


Pretty much the same pack I have been using since the late '70s. The direct ancestor of a Chouinard Fish pack. Just in modern materials made by Randy @ CCW with a few tweaks. These days I generally go with no lid and have two versions. One to climb (clean exterior) with and one to BC ski with, that has a quick compression/ski attachment system.

details here:
http://coldthistle.blogspot.com/2011/01/my-climbing-pack.html
Roots

Mountain climber
SoCal
Feb 21, 2013 - 11:50am PT
Cold Cold World..modified Valdez by Randy.

Modified Valdez
Modified Valdez
Credit: Roots
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Feb 21, 2013 - 01:47pm PT
When super topo is good, it's really good. Somebody from the taco just emailed me a website where I found that red canvas rucsac with a leather bottom and I ordered it and I'm pretty darn happy... Thanks! I've looked and looked for one. Much appreciated.
The Call Of K2 Lou

climber
Squamish
Feb 21, 2013 - 02:51pm PT
Arc-Teryx Muira 50

+ Another.


And yet another still. Love it! I have a self-imposed "Minimum Weight" for my Miura. It doesn't go out the door unless it weighs at least 15 kg/32 lbs. I've had two potential epics turn out to be fondly remembered nights under the stars as a result. Also, the Pali ropebag that fits in the pack bottom is just the bee's knees.


Does this really need a caption? Seems sort of self-explanatory.
Does this really need a caption? Seems sort of self-explanatory.
Credit: The Interwebs
I'm sure many a SuperTopoan is familiar with this Canuck brand. I have too many to count, but my standard every-single-daypack for about 12 years was a 30 litre Brio Crag. Still use it, still looks new(ish), and bet the rent that it'll be around long after I've been made into worms' meat.
DickMcfartin

Ice climber
soewhere over the rainbow....
Feb 21, 2013 - 09:21pm PT
The pack i hate to love...

In all honesty it is giant little POS as it is only one year old with maybe 90-100 days of use in it. Little sh#t is falling apart all over it.

None the less i love how light and simple the pack is. I use it without the back pad as just a floppy empty sack and no waste belt. adding to the simplicity. Guess you gotta pay to play but at $500 never ever again. I so wish it held up to use better as the size and fit are perfect. Durability not so perfect the WNW material is great it just everything sewn into it or onto it that is the problem...

Needless to say a custom Cold Cold World Ozone is in the mail!

photo not found
Missing photo ID#290914
LuckyNeck

Trad climber
the basement of Lou's Tavern
Feb 21, 2013 - 10:02pm PT
credit - the internet
credit - the internet
Credit: LuckyNeck

It's mine and it fits like a glove.

NoTokeRedKneck

climber
Feb 22, 2013 - 06:22am PT
I can't remember the Kelty model but i think it was Tioga
or Sonora. Anyways the Kelty was not frameless and did not have
a aluminum hindged waist support as did the JanSport's of that era.

The frame keeps movement from matter inside the pack off of your
body. When making shoulder strap adjustments for weight transfer
going up hill or downhill the hinged waist suppport became more
uncomfortable than the padded waist support which could be moved
more to my liking over rough terrain.

My JanSport rock climbing pack like the 1'st pictured was my
favorite for rock climbing, but they can all be just about
as uncomfortable. 100-200+ mile trips usually have more
extended periods of time wearing the pack so the old Kelty is
my favorite pack.
NoTokeRedKneck

climber
Feb 22, 2013 - 06:57am PT
Credit: NoTokeRedKneck

That be it. Listed as Sonora, mine was a extra large. Carried 80 lbs.
at 160 lbs. Id pick it now for another long trek over a new frameless.
Sold it in the 80's.

T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Feb 22, 2013 - 07:10am PT
^^^
The Kelty external frame packs were the gold standard in the 60's & 70's,
I had an early 70's Tioga that served me well for 25 yrs.
whitemeat

Trad climber
San Luis Obispo, CA
Feb 22, 2013 - 07:15am PT
well I have two:

the metoulious sentinal or quarter dome for cragging, mine got stolen last year:(.

Credit: whitemeat

and for wearing while you climb to carry your lunch, water, and that extra cam on a multipitch adventure in yosemite the REI flash, its only $25!

Credit: whitemeat
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2013 - 07:30pm PT
Thanks for all the info garnered so far. I hope you all keep it coming. Helps many to decide what the heck is there for them in todays gear world.

I sometimes wonder, being in the "in between" generation, is the frameless pack I just got for back packing better than the old Kelty exterior framed packs?

I work in an outdoor sports gig and most are too young to even have experienced the exterior frames.

Used a great interior frame on my recent desert trip but....I have nothing to compare with. Jammed a lot into it at 45 lbs. and it carried fine.

I guess it's not about the gear. It's about you and going and making your dreams come true. Maybe too much emphasis on gear and not enough on the dreams. lynnie
username

climber
Feb 22, 2013 - 07:49pm PT
I'm too lazy to take pics of my actual pack, but I've been using a Cilogear 40b for the last 2 years for everything from backpacking the Grand Canyon, hiking and peak bagging, carrying gear to the crag, trail work, flights, biking to work, you name it.

Reinforced the bottom and I couldn't be happier. Super light and comfy.
Fletcher

Trad climber
The great state of advaita
Feb 22, 2013 - 07:57pm PT
Hi Lynnie,

Here is a general rule for internal vs. external (as always, there are exceptions):

External frame packs are very good at what they do: carrying large loads on trails. They excel when you need to strap odd shaped things on. Think Norman Clyde and cast iron fry pans!

Internal frame packs are better when off trail and scrambling, since (when fit properly) it fits your body more closely and is more inline with your skeletal structure (that's the idea anyway). They tend to hold less that externals.

So it depends on what you want to do. It really helps to find someone who can help you fit a pack. Just like shoes, on model is great for one and a nightmare for someone else. Have someone measure your torso length (C4 vertebra—the bump at the base of your neck to your tailbone). Once you know that length, it will help you size a pack.

Happy trails!
Eric
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Feb 22, 2013 - 08:08pm PT
I guess it's not about the gear. It's about you and going and making your dreams come true. Maybe too much emphasis on gear and not enough on the dreams. lynnie

-words to live by!!

Gear's cool too though!

I had an adventure yesterday made possible by the technology in a silent partner. Other ways I could have done it but that was definitely the most elegant tool for that outing!
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2013 - 08:25pm PT
Thanks for the post Jaybro. Are you ever coming to So Cal or shall I see you at TPR? How is life and teaching and the Wyde? Yo stellar. Cheers, lynnie

ps and how be the darling nieces and family? Again Cheers, joy and peace.
hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Feb 23, 2013 - 07:31am PT
I have a 37 year old Kletter Works Rock pack aka: "Old Orange" that has been up and down and all around. It's a college graduate- after 8 years, it has been to the Winds, the Valley, Tuolumne, Devils Tower and the City--NOT New York! It's held smokes for folks in Mexico; every time it went to Mexico
It likes to go skiing and canoeing-portaging is it's favorite. One sad winter a yogurt was left in it for a few months but that only added to the mystique- a little time with the garden hose and it was all good. Last summer it carried rocks off the Lewis River trail and lately its been trying to learn to fly fish.
The zipper broke a long time ago but it got sort of fixed and is making do--kinda like its owner
It's been a pretty reliable friend
I'd take a picture but it is shy right now and is pouting in the basement because I told it I was writing about it. Funny how you learn to overlook things

Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2013 - 08:04pm PT
hobo dan, zipper fixer places abound. There is a fantastic one next to Nomad Ventures in Joshua Tree....your shipping would probably cost more than they would charge to fix your pack.

Loved your story. Packs are so special. No matter how they're built they manage to bring us along unknown paths and over landscape we've never dreamed of, enriching our soul, our mind, our bodies.

I am packing my new one for a Mountain Backpack next week-end. We (the pack and I) are talking about the essentials of what lynnie needs to bring. The pack has more wisdom than I at this point. Smiles and Peace tonight. LL
The Lisa

Trad climber
Da Bronx, NY
Feb 23, 2013 - 08:19pm PT
Very nice idea for a thread - who doesn't love to talk about gear.
I have had many faithful packs over the years. Some eventually fell apart from sweat salt and smelt awful despite repeated washing.
My current fave is this Lowe Alpine Hyperlite Mountain Attack 45 - a very simple no-frills top loader with gear loops on the waist belt.
On mountaineering/glacier trips I found my pack waist belt would sit on top of my harness making it hard to access ice screws, pickets, etc. on the harness gear loops. It is much easier to access gear hung off the pack's waist belt, and I am still safely tied into the climbing harness.

It carries heavy stuff really well - in this photo it contains a 62# bag of cement.
Death Race 2012
Death Race 2012
Credit: The Lisa
The Lisa

Trad climber
Da Bronx, NY
Feb 23, 2013 - 08:22pm PT
After the 2010 Death Race the pack stank of onions for a while - we had to carry 10# of onions as part of the mandatory gear, and repeated river crossings made for an oniony slush in there. I left it in the yard for a week and the smell mostly dissipated.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2013 - 08:34pm PT
Lisa, you look like you enjoy life. Hope to meet you someday. Ciao, lynnie
Anastasia

climber
Home
Feb 23, 2013 - 08:40pm PT
It's a Mystery Pack built by the original owner/designer of Dana Design. The pack is strong, distributes weight well which means it feels good to carry, it is highly organized and it can go. The price is higher, but since it's built in Montana and is the last pack I plan to buy... It works for me.

I love it.

Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2013 - 08:48pm PT
Ana, after all you've schooled me on in the outdoor arena I am a believer in your pack. But doubt it will be your last one young un'. It may be your kiddos pack ultimately and then Mama gets the new "Porche" Pack.

Miss you and the Dr. Big time. It was so great to see you and the babe at TPR this past summer. If you come up again let me know and I'll get time off.

Love to you and your beautiful family, lynne.
Anastasia

climber
Home
Feb 23, 2013 - 09:08pm PT
Hopefully I can come again, with a helper so I won't be so wasted.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2013 - 09:24pm PT
Ana, we can work it out if we have time for planning. Hugs and good night beautiful mother and kind friend. Peace, lynne.

hobo_dan

Social climber
Minnesota
Feb 24, 2013 - 07:22am PT
Top loaders are the best.

I got curious and I checked the $ of old Orange--It was A LOT more--like $200 more than it was 35 years ago. Unbelievable.

A sad story--My buddy is going through a divorce, wife has left, house has been sold, no time to unload and do everything, no time at all. He just takes his Kletterwork Bomb Pack and throws it away in the trash because there was no space left on his plate to deal with it. I still can't fathom being so blown that you don't have the bandwidth to tuck it in the back seat--and this guy is the best. Just another slice of the human condition.

I am trying to find my Blue Wilderness Experience "Book Bag". Total simple pack but it was great- and now it's lost in the ether

Have a great trip Lynn-that new pack is going to be fun to load, and it's fun deciding what to and what not to. My advice: bring too much booze and food
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 24, 2013 - 08:42am PT
Hobo, I am so, so sorry about your friend. Death and divorce both produce enormous amounts of grief. I will pray for your friend. It took me a few years (read 5) before I got kinda OK with Dan's death.

Thanks for the advice. On last week's desert backpack I brought 4.5 lbs of food (way too much). Found that half that will be sufficient for the upcoming mountain camp, thus freeing up space for........a nip of brandy before I say my prayers and go nighty night. :DD
Anastasia

climber
Home
Feb 24, 2013 - 09:44am PT
Lynne,
Oh dear sweet pea... Just plan for each meal, plan what you will eat and then pack just that and stick to the plan. You will not be supplying options or for other folks, only what you need. Don't ever pack one once more since you need to "carry it." Plus the more you carry, the worse your trip will be. Less really is MORE.
AFS
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 24, 2013 - 10:02am PT
Love you Pepper! You are still schooling me and I Love It!!! And I've come a long way, Baby:D
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Feb 24, 2013 - 10:18am PT
Found this in my friends barn last week, pre Trapper Nelson? WW2? would hold a nice Pony Keg?

Credit: guido
Credit: guido
The Lisa

Trad climber
Da Bronx, NY
Feb 24, 2013 - 04:51pm PT
Lynne, I would love to meet you in person. Until then I am glad to read your posts here on the Taco :)
Captain...or Skully

climber
Feb 24, 2013 - 06:32pm PT
The Lisa is one of my heroes. That gal is badass.
Hi, Lynne(yep, you're in that Pantheon, too), anyway, my favorite pack is whatever pack I get that will do what I need it to for as long as I need it to. Right now, I'm "testing" an REI Crestrail 70. So far so good. I just retired my old Jansport model unknown(about the same size as the REI pack)and frankly that thing was amazingly tough. I abused it for 13 years.
Cheers, Ladies.
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Feb 24, 2013 - 06:58pm PT
You need different catagories:-)

Working at the cliffs or big loads: My Cilogear Big Hauly, an improved version of the Gregory Big Wally which Can't Say posted up thread. I have an original Gregory as well. In fact, I was steered to the beauty of this amazing pack by a thread on Supertopo that HealyJ started.


Same model but a different Hauly couple hundred feet up, it is looking lumpy here we've been hauling up sharp rocks and it's been weathering that abuse fine, but it carries like a dream:

End of season I pulled so much crap out of this cliff, @ 78 lbs, that I could barely stand up, and the thing took it all. 4 full sized ropes (2 were 12mm static lines), bolting crap, etc etc. But still comfortable.


For dayhikes and solo climbing: another Cilogear pack which I won at a raffle. Seen below with Sadie May the Trailer Park Floozie where Roger Smiths ashes were scattered.


Climbing - soloing here with the rope stuffed in it, starting to toss a big double black 1" tubular webbing sling on the top so I can get off this pinnacle. Pretty scary wondering if the entire top would hold my bodyweight or fall off....



In the historical category, fav is the uber rare Forrest Haulpack


Different view:


It doesn't carry as well as the Cilogear Big Hauly, but that's OK, it was way before it's time.




Most perved pack would be my buddies Cilogear 45L superlight. Holy MOG that thing is amazing. Really really want. But I have so many packs that size....maybe 15. Don't need another (cough* cough*). Besides, I drag crap up and down cliffs. The Hauly has seen many thousand's of feet of that, and the superlight Cilogear wouldn't take that abuse. ...still...
David Knopp

Trad climber
CA
Feb 24, 2013 - 07:06pm PT
Credit: David Knopp
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/spo/3623691392.html

just saw the above post, thought one of you gear types might want this-me, i already have umm half a dozen packs.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 24, 2013 - 07:06pm PT
Skully, cheers to You too!

Couchmaster, yo right on. Categories......Right now I'm too Newbie to have all the packs in the categories, but working on it. Right now starting to pull stuff together for my mountain backpack in 6 days.

I will do and be better than my last gig two weeks ago thanks to all yo posters.

Cheers this beautiful incredibly full moon evening. lynnie
The Lisa

Trad climber
Da Bronx, NY
Feb 25, 2013 - 07:31pm PT
Yes there is a lovely full moon out there :)

Couchmaster, Cilogear makes amazing packs. How nice to have won one!
Powder

Trad climber
Bay Area; the Flower Box
Feb 25, 2013 - 10:44pm PT
Pack(s)... oh boy... Numerous photography bags/packs (losing count on how many... :X ), but we're talking about pack(s) for cragging/peaks bagging/backpacking/hiking... so here they are:

For cragging,this is my favorite

Credit: VL
ArcTeryx Miura 50; the one I have is actually 45L for it's short/xs, just like every other thing I own...

Super comfortable!!!!! And I like the color. =) (Although the gear loop is sort of useless - had to customize it to make it better; also the hydration pocket is a joke. No biggie though; I simply don't use it but the Kangaroo pouch. Now, that is awesome. ...always love the Kangaroo pouch on ArcTeryx packs. )


For backpacking, this is it

Credit: Powder

Credit: Powder
ArcTeryx Bora 62.

've had this pack for 10+ years. LOVE LOVE LOVE it!!! There are many more "modern" or "ultra light" packs nowadays, however, this has been and I know it will always be my favorite. Being small, it wasn't easy for me to find a pack that fit nicely (still isn't easy). This was THE perfect one, and it was/still is extremely comfortable. Surely, it is not light, but I've never felt any discomfort and the "extra" weight of the pack neither had I have any problem carrying the load with it. It ain't light, but so comfortable I barely felt the weight on the trail, so I could just keep going and going and going... The end of the day, I was a happy backpacker; the end of the trip, I still had the biggest smile on my face. (unlike some of the newer and lighter packs I acquired later - lighter, but not exactly comfortable. )


For peaks bagging/longer day hikes/some backpacking trips, this is the bomb

Credit: Powder

Credit: VL
Osprey Ace 48.

This actually is a kid's pack. The torso is adjustable (yet I still need to go to the smaller end...) Ever since I discovered this pack, it has been served as a multipurpose pack: peaks bagging,day hikes, snowshoeing, quick overnighter, 4-day-backpacking trip with a full size bear canister in it, 3-day-winter-camping trip on the snow, with a full size bear canister in it...

Originally, I got this mainly for peaks bagging. Again, it is not ultra light, but I needed the capacity, for I was doing photography and was often carrying more loads than many other people. I needed something that could fit all my photographic gear and yet was still comfortable - most of all, something that would fit me perfectly. Later I found it so comfy I started to use it for other trips. ...was especially amazed when I fit everything I needed for a 4-day-backpacking-trip including shelter WITH a full size bear canister in it (I was always self-efficient, carrying everything on my own.) This has become a good alternative (I had to disassemble my beloved Bora 62 to clean after an extended muddy but super fun backpacking trip in TW years ago and somehow have never put it back... ) Oh yeah, it also came with a pack cover (we all know how much those companies charge for those covers... )


As for multi-pitch climbs, my favorite is Mammut Neon Light. Again, this is like the only one that serves the needs and fits me perfectly at the same time.(REI Flash 18 is cool; personally I like the design of Neon Light a bit better.)



When going ultra-light, without any photographic gear, this is my favorite summit pack (so small, compact, and light that it fits perfectly in a backpack, also serving as a compression sack if needed)

Credit: Powder

Credit: Powder
Dana Design kompressor/now Marmot Marmot Kompressor. Yes, I have both... And yes, these photos were taken on the summit of Mt Dana - how could I not?! >:)





...feel like such a gear-head now. X_x



P.S. For reference, I'm barely 5ft tall, 4'11 to be exact.
Powder

Trad climber
Bay Area; the Flower Box
Feb 25, 2013 - 11:01pm PT
It's a Mystery Pack built by the original owner/designer of Dana Design.

Whoa!! Mystery Ranch!!!!!

I've only seen this pack once... It was when I was backpacking in Taiwan....


Anastasia

climber
Home
Feb 27, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
I am so excited for you. I want pictures of your getup and... If you get any from your trip, post up!!!!
Anastasia

climber
Home
Feb 27, 2013 - 12:04pm PT
I'll pull it out and post up. It's in the garage waiting for that BIG trip with my son. We are going to have the most exciting times!!!!
SCseagoat

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Feb 27, 2013 - 12:14pm PT
Whenever we are in The 2nd Wind in Bozeman I come up the stairs to where all the packs are and think about all the adventures these packs have been on. And I look at all the baby and toddler packs and wonder what those kids are up to now. And the parents who agonized over turning the pack in because they were finished having babies.

This picture is only one spot, there are packs behind me, coming up the steps and around the corner. Maybe you see one of your old packs?

"packorama" in The 2nd Wind used gear store in Bozeman.
"packorama" in The 2nd Wind used gear store in Bozeman.
Credit: SCseagoat

Susan
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Feb 27, 2013 - 01:46pm PT
"Couchmaster, Cilogear makes amazing packs. How nice to have won one!"

It was even niceer of Cilogear to donate one to support a raffle that climbers considered a worthy cause at an ice comp. I'd bought a shitload of raffle tickets to also support the cause, I never win anything and lord knows I really don't need any more gear, and then layed down and fell right asleep during Waynes pretty good slide show having been out new routing that day. 1 beer and it was nap time, right in the middle of a crowd of 200 climbers. Woke up, handed the tickets to someone nearby and went home to shower and sleep. Slide show still on. Totally and 100% forgot all about it and was later shocked to hear that I'd won a bunch of stuff. Woot!

Anyway, one more reason to support a company like Cilogear, I've seen them donate multiple times to causes. http://www.cilogear.com/
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2013 - 08:31pm PT
Loading the new pack for tomorrow. A weekend backpack in the Santa Ros...
Loading the new pack for tomorrow. A weekend backpack in the Santa Rosa Mtns. of So Cal. Pack and I are still getting used to each other. Question is ....will this turn out to be a favorite pack. We are trying to work with each other. I like the lines.
Credit: LL LL

Trying to get it lighter and more friendly to both the pack and I.
Captain...or Skully

climber
Mar 1, 2013 - 08:36pm PT
I think most modern packs will do what you need them to.
They're all way better than you might think.
Sometimes, I buy stuff at KMart. Not Camalots though, those things are bunk.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2013 - 09:10pm PT
HI Skully, Hope life is good for yo. I am getting out more and the love of life scale then goes wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy up. Cheers and Smiles, lynnie
CalicoJack

climber
CA
Mar 3, 2013 - 12:56pm PT
BootyMaster!
BootyMaster!
Credit: CalicoJack

I bought my Mountainsmith Auspex back in early 2004 for backpacking. At ~ 4 lbs w/ a capacity of 4000 ci, it's held up to loads in excess of 55lbs, seen me through week long solo hikes, and will swallow up an Indian Creek rack & rope. Yesterday we also discovered that the removable aluminum suspension struts are a critical component of our bootying arsenal. I've beaten the sh#t outta this thing for 9 years & I'd bet that I'll get another decade out of it.

Cheers,

Andy
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2013 - 03:48pm PT
Just got back. My Gregory Jetstream LTS responded well for the 2nd time. Weighs more than the ULA super lightweight packs, but has way more hip support.

Friend that went this trip took a ULA she recently purchased and loved it. (and she's darn picky.) ULA is the ultra light weight pack of today for both men and women

On both trips I carried from 42 to (this trip) 39 pounds of weight. Next goal to get the weight down so I'll last longer. Tho I am fine now with this, thinking of the future and LONG trips.

Love the back country trips. Looking and finding some new boulder areas. See some high faces, but Warbler has probably checked out everyone in So Cal. Do know one spot that may be an unknown keeper and the reason for all this backpacking. Cheers, lynnie
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2013 - 04:06pm PT
[photo
sunrise this morning in the SoCal Santa Rosas.
sunrise this morning in the SoCal Santa Rosas.
Credit: LL LL


Not many good boulders on this weekend trip. A few along highway 371 b...
Not many good boulders on this weekend trip. A few along highway 371 but not enough to consider it a destination.
Credit: LL LL


Pretty weekend in the outback. One thing that needs to be done. Cut ba...
Pretty weekend in the outback. One thing that needs to be done. Cut back on weight of my pack. First trip, 42# this trip 39# but I cut out stuff to bring a tent.
Credit: LL LL

If I really want to explore need to get the weight into the mid to high 20's.












Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 3, 2013 - 04:29pm PT
And I need to bring a day pack to explore after set up camp. Any suggestions for a nice light weight day pack? I have a couple but one is not going to hold up. The other take up too much space in the backpack. Ciao and enjoy the land. lynne
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Mar 3, 2013 - 06:12pm PT
Lynnie, check out http://www.cilogear.com/ Awesome stuff, made in America. My daypack (I actually have 2 of theirs now) wads up to something smaller and lighter than grandmas panties, but is super comfortable.
bajaandy

climber
Escondido, CA
Mar 3, 2013 - 07:43pm PT
Hey Lynnie, how were the Santa Rosa's? Remind me to tell you the story about getting my truck snowed in up there one time when I hiked from Toro peak to the desert floor. Hope ya had fun!!
whitemeat

Trad climber
San Luis Obispo, CA
Mar 3, 2013 - 07:56pm PT
the black diamond hollow point is also one of my favorite "where when climbing" packs !!

Credit: whitemeat
mareko

Trad climber
San Francisco
Mar 4, 2013 - 07:58am PT
Arc-teryx Miura 30 The best bag I've ever owned.
BrassNuts

Trad climber
Save your a_s, reach for the brass...
Mar 5, 2013 - 03:44pm PT
Does anyone here have any feedback on the Mountain Tools Desperado Crag & Haul Pack? It looks like a nice simple, durable and haulable design...
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2013 - 11:25pm PT
Getting ready for San Jacinto Peak this weekend.
Getting ready for San Jacinto Peak this weekend.
Credit: LL LL


So the new pack is going to be doing the big stuff this weekend. Snowshoes attached for first time and pack is feeling happy. May have some snow up there Wednesday or Thursday. That would make for an awesome trip.

Where are your packs going?????
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 19, 2013 - 11:39pm PT
Saving this space
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 19, 2013 - 11:44pm PT
"Saving this Space"? What Jaybro friend of mine are yo saving ??? :D
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2013 - 10:27pm PT
Packed and ready to leave early a.m. for San Jacinto Peak.
Packed and ready to leave early a.m. for San Jacinto Peak.
Credit: LL LL


Guess spending quality time with your new pack can make it finally a favorite one. Tho this one is heavier than the ULA and others I'm thinking it will work for me. Lots of support built into it and we've covered some miles together now.
Cheers, Lynnie
10b4me

Ice climber
Happy Boulders
Mar 23, 2013 - 08:13am PT
And I have friends who swear by Cold Cold World. I'll have to try one.
Gary, you and I know this guy who likes CCW packs, but I think right now he is usin a Cilo Gear pack.
For the last few years, I've been using a Mammut Ice(45l) pack for cragging. It's been very durable.
For the backcountry, I really like my Osprey Argon 85. It's comfortable, and roomy. Weighs about 5lbs
Evel

Trad climber
Nedsterdam CO
Mar 23, 2013 - 11:45am PT
Yo Brassnuts, the Desperado is a cool bag. Easily goes from carry to haul mode. For my money though I'd go with something like a Fish Atom Smasher or Metolius Quarter Dome if you're really going to haul it.

As for my favorite, Wild Things Andinista gets er done on many levels. And I used to have a Karrimor Dougal Haston rucksack that was the shizz.
F10

Trad climber
Bishop
Mar 23, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
I had the Mtn. Tool Desperado pack and wasn't happy with it, seemed kinda small.

I was used to my Gregory Big Wally, great pack !!
Anastasia

climber
Home
Mar 23, 2013 - 01:01pm PT
Really happy for you Lynn!
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 23, 2013 - 01:24pm PT
I've put about a thousand miles on a Gregory Denali Pro. Basically the biggest pack you can get, and it was stuffed.

Even though it is well constructed, when you have 75 lbs. in it, it feels like a torture device after a few weeks.

I have a little Lowe day pack which I can put a light down bag and a Marmot stuff sack into. It is like air.

It isn't so much the pack as it is what you are hauling.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Mar 23, 2013 - 03:28pm PT
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 24, 2013 - 07:28pm PT
Cosmic, felt like that once or twice this weekend. Gotta continue to refine and get lighter. But I had a blast and we even went up tiny Cornell Peak. Will post more later just got home.


Edit: Ana Thanks! Your encouragement in the beginning of LL Part Two was my first and best building block for all that has happened. Cheers, Lynne

Edit #2: I appreciate all you posters beta on all kinds of packs and how you use them. It's fun to think about all the combos one can use and each pack has different features and utilities. Like I said, I'm going to try a super light pack, but I really love the suspension on my Gregory Z65 Jet Stream.

Like Base104 said above, "It's about what you're hauling. Still took too many trail snacks and other small items. What I will bring in the future is a tiny pair of binoculars.

Baja Andy, the snow shoes worked great. Thanks a Bunch!!
bajaandy

climber
Escondido, CA
Mar 25, 2013 - 01:23pm PT
Woohoo Lynne! Cornell Peak is a cool summit. Love the drop off on the north side. What exposure! Glad the 'shoes' worked for ya.
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 25, 2013 - 08:30pm PT
Checked out the Karrimor Jaguar at 6 lbs, to heavy, and the Andinista, pretty pricy at $360, tho a nice pack!

Back home from the weekend backpack, working in sweet, fragrant, sun kissed, warm air of the avocado grove, golden California poppies opening right in front of me I thought. "Yo, you just need to get out there, equipment is often irrelevant. Throw your essentials to survive in a pillowcase if need be and get out to the wilderness."

Spent the weekend in a simple tent, enjoyed to the max simple food along with liters of wonderful H2O. Discovered the art of trail finding. Essential living.

Peace mixed with the smell of warm pine needles. lynnie
Lynne Leichtfuss

Sport climber
moving thru
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 25, 2013 - 08:58pm PT
Cute little casa in the San Jacinto Wilderness.
Cute little casa in the San Jacinto Wilderness.
Credit: LL LL


Where backpacks take you....the karma, feeling, of meeting some of the...
Where backpacks take you....the karma, feeling, of meeting some of these tree folk along the way was more than incredible.
Credit: LL LL















Captain...or Skully

climber
Mar 25, 2013 - 09:12pm PT
I heartily agree, Lynne.
QITNL

climber
Mar 25, 2013 - 09:15pm PT
Nice one, LL.
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