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nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Original Post - Jan 25, 2013 - 10:38pm PT
I know there are a few divers on this forum. cozmeek, phil b....

I'm in the middle of my DCS cert through SSI.

It's time to upgrade some equipment - computer, BC, second stage

For computer I use Dive Log DT on my mac which syncs nicely with my iphone/ipad. I'm kinda curious how iGills works but probably won't by the hardware to find out. So I'm looking for something that easily syncs with dive log dt.

next up is a new second stage. My basic Oceanic just isn't designed for hard work.

BC - probably leaning towards integrated weights.

so what's the latest and greatest these days. or maybe the cozmeeks of the group still wear metal diving helmets and need not respond ;-P
zip

Trad climber
pacific beach, ca
Jan 25, 2013 - 10:44pm PT
DCS?
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2013 - 10:47pm PT
yeah, they certify us for DeCompression Sickness.

Dive Control Specialist. Basically it's divemaster plus you can teach some basic courses and assist in teaching OW, etc.
zip

Trad climber
pacific beach, ca
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:01pm PT
got it.
Anastasia

climber
InLOVEwithAris.
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:03pm PT
The gear has changed so radically since I instructed with PADI... First though... What are you using? Regular Air, Nitrox, Trimix? How deep are you being certified for, your intentions? Are you thinking about a re-breather?

All I know is the basics. Have a back up for everything, don't EVER dive without a partner and... Don't be stupid and leave your partner's side which is equivalent of diving alone. I know two deaths of experienced divers that were because the person was diving alone and four death of a person dying because they wandered away from their partner.

Best person to ask is your instructor. They usually are testing gear for their shop, and have seen everything on their students. I haven't dove professionally in YEARS... I am sure to be out of the LOOP.

I personally love Suunto Computers, mine is over a decade old of hard use and it's still awesome. I also love Zeagle BCD's. Though I prefer back inflations than a full jacket so keep that in mind. Anyway... Carry on...


Ooh, you are working with students! That makes sense... Get your gear sleak, not have things floating around since it will tangle with your students and complicate things. Back ups are awesome. This includes having a spare air. A dive watch will help immensely!!!

zip

Trad climber
pacific beach, ca
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:06pm PT
"don't EVER dive without a partner"

Ha Ha Ha
Anastasia

climber
InLOVEwithAris.
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:11pm PT
Yes, I mean that even while being an instructor. You should still be partnered up. I have a very close friend die because of that. Part of the year of hell that included the car accident. I Did Not Enjoy That, would love never hearing that kind of news again.

Remember gear failure happens and only way to survive that is being in reach of a partner. You must keep your gear up to date. I am planning on diving soon so guess what, my computer, BCD is getting tuned up at the shop. New gear is a great idea if you use it hard.

Luckily all instructors get pro-deals. Use it, sell your old and trade up!



this just in

climber
north fork
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:14pm PT
I have a Zeagle BCD and the Integrated weight system is the way to go. It's been a few years since my last dive, so don't know anything about the apps you are talking about, but I bet it's pretty cool way to track your dives. Way better than dive logs. Diving is a great thing and really makes you feel small as a human. As climbers, the feeling of weightlessness is a great feeling to experience. I'm thinking I need to get back under, thanks for the stoke.

Edit: Oh sh#t, I'm thinking a taco dive sushi fest.
rurprider

Trad climber
Mt. Rubidoux
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:19pm PT
Nature....try LeisurePro, ScubaToys, Diver'sSupply, JoeDiverAmerica....all very knowledgeable and helpful, with lots of gear at discounts. Also, contact DAN (Diver's Alert Network) at (800)446-2671 is a topnotch resource, or contact your local diver center.
Anastasia

climber
InLOVEwithAris.
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:20pm PT
I want a Zeagle...
My shop didn't carry the line and so I pro dealed a scubapro. It doesn't fit me well so dreaming of selling it and switching to a better fitting BCD. I really need to start diving regularly again before I can justify spending that kind of money and... Well, being a mommy I don't foresee that as being soon.
Ah well, kiddo is worth it.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2013 - 11:23pm PT
That's two votes for Zeagles so ill check those out.

I'm a fan of Suunto but in this case I'm looking for specific model recommendations that'll interface with my apps.

Same goes for secondary. The technology certainly is changing. In class last night we took regs apart and also bench tested them. Mine somehow didn't free flow at 10bars but still isn't designed for real work.

Another line item is strobes for my digi rig. I'm going light with a canon s100 and canon housing. Looking for strobe recommendations.

Rurp - I like leisure pro but there is a lot to choose from. So I'm looking for input. My dive shop is SSI which has the biz model of coupling adventure with retail. They
promote hard what they sell.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:29pm PT
Nature;
I'm still old school.
I don't use a dive computer
I use the old fashioned but still accurate U.S. Navy dive tables,
and plan my dive and dive my plan

as for the BC, a lot of people buy tank packs with the BC built in,
I prefer a separate BC so if I have ever the need to drop my tanks the bc stays with me.

And No, I'm not that old school that I use a single stage regulator.

:)
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:33pm PT
Doug, it's time for a reality check.

You live in Boulder.

There is no diving in Boulder.

There is no diving within a thousand miles of boulder.

Transfer your equipment fetish back to knives and climbing gear.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2013 - 11:33pm PT
Dive tables penalize you. I'm sure you know that. Might as well climb in EBs ;-)

No single stage. There's a secondary on your metal dive helmut?

David. I'll be in the Florida keys next month. Costa Rica in march. Diving with whale sharks in July.

Besides... I have knives and more than enough climbing gear.

And there's a pool at the dive shop.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:42pm PT
They may penalize you, but they are safe.
If you follow them you won't have to use a Decomp chamber.

:)
I alway did enjoy nitrogen narcosis though.

;-P
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2013 - 11:47pm PT
Goldline is safe too.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jan 25, 2013 - 11:53pm PT

Yer gunna die!
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 26, 2013 - 12:03am PT
I retired my goldline a couple of year ago.

I won der what kind of tables the astronauts use to prevent decomp sickness
before they do their space walks?

I know they go on a special mix for a period
of time before the space walk.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2013 - 12:10am PT
Tables? Astronauts? I'll bet they use computers :-)

And by the way.. I would never dispute the safety of conservative dive tables. But they were devised initially through trial and error. We know so much more know about partial pressure gas absorption and the variations within different body tissues. Only computers can more accurately crunch those numbers.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 26, 2013 - 12:16am PT
LOLOLOL
moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:33am PT
My equipment is quite old too. No help from me, sorry.

A little story. Several years ago I bought a diving computer. Since I don’t trust it 100% I always dive with my watch and the old mechanical depth gauge (I keep it in my BCD). Two years ago I went diving but I forgot to check my computer. I haven’t realized the battery was dead until I got into water. I checked my pocket and was very happy that the gauge was still there. I will try to remember to check my computer before going diving, but I won’t get rid of the gauge either!
Captain...or Skully

climber
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:37am PT
Dude, you can spell gauge! I was hoping that SOMEONE could.
Sooner or later. Whew.;-)
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:47am PT
I still dive with a depth gauge that you wear on the wrist,
and I stillalways have my waterproof dive table card on a lanyard(YARRR)
attached to my dive slate,just in case there is a change in the
Dive Plan.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:49am PT
Only computers can more accurately crunch those numbers.

Well, there you go. You've answered your own question. Just grab your iPad and dive in!
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Jan 26, 2013 - 03:46am PT
Man, do I feel out of date. I learned to to dive and got my PADI and LA County certification in '81 while at Cal Poly Pomona. The head of the program then was Otto Gasser (glad to see he's still kicking - and what a perfect name for a diver!).

Maybe I'm a curmudgeon, but I'm with Cosmic, I'd still trust a depth gauge, watch and dive table more that a computer.

Oh, and hey you kids, get off my lawn! ;-)
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Jan 26, 2013 - 05:19am PT
Reading some of the A&I threads at ScubaBoard, seems 2 dive computers are the accepted norm now. I'll be buying a new one.

http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2013 - 09:42am PT
m'eh... grimm stories. yeah, I plan on keeping my current computer. It's about as basic as it gets - oceanic datapro 100 - but it does the job. nice big nitrogen graph and ascent rate.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 26, 2013 - 10:44am PT
" Maybe I'm a curmudgeon, but I'm with Locker, I'd still trust a depth gauge, watch and dive table more that a computer."






Uhhhh, Froodish, Don't you mean, Cosmic?

I'm pretty sure Locker doesn't Scuba Dive.
Jon Beck

Trad climber
Oceanside
Jan 26, 2013 - 10:46am PT
Old school here, still have most of my gear from the eighties, rarely sport dive now, no partner. All of my diving is boat cleaning now, for that I use a hookah rig, 25 foot hose on a dockside tank.
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 10:56am PT
Cool cosmic, my dad is a retired doctor who was a naval medical officer bitd and worked on developing the navy dive tables. Also I've a bunch of dive gear(modern) I would give away for cheap .Also anyone into underwater photoraphy, I have a bunch of Nikonis camera bodies ,flashes etc. Pm me if interested. cheers, paul linaweaver
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2013 - 11:49am PT
PM Sent...
DrMaino

Trad climber
Denver, CO
Jan 26, 2013 - 12:24pm PT
Just FYI, when I was transporting bent civilian divers by helo for the Navy the majority were using nitrox and all were using computers. Just sayin...
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2013 - 12:38pm PT
At the time had the navy made a switch over to computers? Do/did their divers have a choice?

Seems like you are making a point which is fair but w/o additional facts and details it's hard to judge the value of your point. Are you suggesting there's an inherent problem with computers?

Navy diving != recreational diving.

Hell I'm not at all interested in technical diving. but if I'm going to spend thousands of dollars to visit some exotic tropical place on this planet I'd like to maximize my bottom time. Computers give recreational divers that. Dive tables do not.

People make mistakes both with how they use their computers as well as how they figure out where they are on their dive table. And about the last thing I'd ever want to do is try and do dive table calcs at 120' when I'm narc'd.

by chance you wouldn't be the doc that runs the decomp tank in Denver would you?
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:42pm PT
I like my Zeagle BCD. Am off to Sulawesi in 2 weeks to dive Bunaken.
I want to go to Komodo some day but need to get more experience. Check out this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nerqAeWFKD0

locker

Social climber
state of Kumbaya...
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:47pm PT
"I'm pretty sure Locker doesn't Scuba Dive."...

Sort of true...

Sort of not...

My Cousin some many years back stuck his weight belt (he outweighed me by about 100lbs) and tank on yours truly, then pushed me off the boat...

I sunk to the bottom (about 25ft) and couldn't fuking breath through that piece of sh!t worth a fuk...

So I spit it out and then TRIED like hell to swim to the surface quickly discovering that the weight of the belt held me down...

Before I DROWNED, my cousin jumped in and pulled me to the surface with a HUGE apoplogy (I was only 14, he was in his 30's. Not the most responsible cousin... LOL!!!)...

So you see...

I DO have SOME "scuba diving" experience...


Geez...

Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:49pm PT
Look before you leap...

photo not found
Missing photo ID#236898
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:51pm PT
Credit: east side underground

for nature,
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:53pm PT
Credit: east side underground
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:55pm PT
Credit: east side underground
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:58pm PT
I was in the Maldives last year. We did one reef, there was an 18 foot Mama Shark in a grotto pumping out babies. The little sharks were all over like mosquitoes. Never guite saw the like.

Mama Shark
Mama Shark
Credit: John Duffield

Baby Shark
Baby Shark
Credit: John Duffield
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 01:59pm PT
Credit: east side underground

sorry folks , I'm a moron who only knows how to post one photo at a time. :)
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Jan 26, 2013 - 02:02pm PT
Just press the photo button again eastside. Each time you do it generates a new code for the photo you pick.
froodish

Social climber
Portland, Oregon
Jan 26, 2013 - 02:12pm PT
Uhhhh, Froodish, Don't you mean, Cosmic?

Doh!, yes, sorry, reading too fast.
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 02:18pm PT
thanks, big mike. I hope we get into winter mode again soon. way to warm here[photo
Credit: east side underground
id=286556]
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2013 - 02:31pm PT
OK Zeagle junkies....


which one:
http://www.scuba.com/manufacturers/zeagle/Buoyancy-Compensators.html?rf=9&PKeyword=Zeagle%20Bcd&gclid=CL3O7arhhrUCFYp_QgodDTkAcg
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Jan 26, 2013 - 02:48pm PT
Credit: east side underground

Me too. You almost got it! Just make sure the photoid's are separate!


Hey! That's Sproatt right?
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Jan 26, 2013 - 02:52pm PT
I have no idea mike, but it's your hood.... which rocks!!!!
this just in

climber
north fork
Jan 26, 2013 - 03:02pm PT
I have the Concept II which has been discontinued. The ranger looks similar and seems like a good deal. If you ever get down to the south pacific, New Zealand and Fiji are incredible dive spots and though I haven't been to Australia, The great barrier reef.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2013 - 03:14pm PT
I was thinking the Ranger as well. hmm....
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jan 26, 2013 - 03:20pm PT
so what's the latest and greatest these days.

I strongly recommend that you look in the Hogarthian configuration. As a climber, you will appreciate the harness and simplicity. Steer away from the old-school jacket BCs.

The Hogarthian configuration is also known as the backplate & wing (BP/W) configuration. It was named after Bill Hogarth, who revised the "standard" scuba configuration into something much more simplistic, modular and clean. The Hogarthian configuration works for both recreational and technical diving.

Underwater you are suspended from the harness so you don't even feel the backplate. The plate and harness together are like a climber's harness - very secure.

In another decade, the BP/W will be the standard for recreational scuba. Right now, the BP/W is THE standard for all technical diving.

Basically the BP/W is just a metal plate rigged with a harness that attaches to you tank. Here is an example of a backplate with double steel 130s (the wing is omitted):

Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

The "wing" is a bladder that is sandwiched between the BP and tank. You can buy different size wings for different situations. I have a wing with 27 pounds of lift for single-tank recreational diving, a 40# wing for aluminum doubles and a 55# wing for steel doubles. Here is another photos showing the BP/W with doubles:

A 40# wing mounted to twin aluminum 80s
A 40# wing mounted to twin aluminum 80s
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Finally, here is a photo of me with a single tank with a BP/W. You can see how it's all very clean and streamlined.

SLR on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia
SLR on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Here is a front view of one of my cave diving buddies - you can see how clean you are in front. You don't have all that clutter up front like you do with a jacket BC. Your "octopus" is suspended on a bungee necklace right under your chin, where you can always find it. (The Hogarthian philosophy is to donate the regulator in your mouth to an out-of-air diver, and then you go to your backup regulator on the necklace.)

We use a "long hose" (the yellow hose in the photo below) for the primary regulator - the extra length makes sharing air a lot easier. In cave diving you have to have a long hose so that you can pass single-file through tight restrictions while still sharing air.

Primary regulator is on a 7-foot yellow hose. (I use a black hose....
Primary regulator is on a 7-foot yellow hose. (I use a black hose.) The backup regulator is on a bungee around the neck.
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

About cumputers - Nowadays a lot of dive boats require the use of a computer for "safety." Just get something simple that also has a Nitrox function. I like Suuntos because I prefer Sunnto's Reduced Gradient Bubble Model (RGBM) for the computations. Gives you Haldane calculations when you're shawllow and RGBM model calculations when you're deep. Best of both worlds.

I do not use a computer for technical and decompression diving - I use the old Navy tables. Plan your dive, dive your plan.

Viva la Scuba!
One of my early cave diving photographs
One of my early cave diving photographs
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Souces for BP/W gear:

https://www.deepseasupply.com/

My favorite is Halcyon
Halcyon, the "Patagucci" of technical scuba
http://www.halcyon.net/

I have a full dive shop/compressor in my garage. I can mix any kind of dive gas (Nitrox and Trimix), and I inspect and maintain all of my own gear/tanks. Any other questions? Just send me an e-mail.

Sierra Ledge Rat and his own private dive shop & compressor.
Sierra Ledge Rat and his own private dive shop & compressor.
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

locker

Social climber
state of Kumbaya...
Jan 26, 2013 - 03:24pm PT

^^^

pretty COOL...

;-)

Anastasia

climber
InLOVEwithAris.
Jan 26, 2013 - 04:15pm PT
That's awesome! Your own compressor that can make any mix simply blows the mind! I know of guys that have compressors on boats but they all do regular air.

Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jan 26, 2013 - 04:22pm PT
The compressor only spits out compressed air. I run the air through a serious of purifiers and filters so that it meets OC (oxygen compatibility) standards. Then I can do partial-pressure blending to mix any kind of gas.

I also have the option of titrating a small amount of oxygen into the compressor inlet to do continuous blends that contain a maximum of 40% oxygen. I have oxygen sensors at the compressor inlet to monitor the intake.
locker

Social climber
state of Kumbaya...
Jan 26, 2013 - 04:27pm PT


"titrating"...

Wasn't that one of the problems with the "BOOB" thread???...

John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Jan 26, 2013 - 05:00pm PT
wow! cool!!

I too like the setup above. I also keep my Primary on a loop around the neck and the Octo on a 2 meter hose. Many jackets have the air sharing built in, in a real situation, you;d be so close all you can go is go straight up. With a tech rig like that, you have more options. Nice, when things are coming unwrapped inside a wreck.

I will get with a backplate next time. I've rented them, you can get the doubles on, the weights get bolted in between the plate and the tank. Of course ditching a weight belt is for n00bs. lol

AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Jan 26, 2013 - 07:17pm PT
There is some high end cave diving exploration to be done up here.
Castlegard is one of the longest systems around and an 800m long sump has been dived but not till the end.
I am not into cave diving but have done cenote diving in Mexico.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 26, 2013 - 07:44pm PT
One of my all-time favorite books ...




I know diving can be really stressful, especially if you're cavern diving etc., but I find diving incredibly relaxing. Climbing and flying paragliders I'm way more amped.


I've been diving off and on since 1977 since HS, advanced NASDS openwater certified at Poway HS through The Diving Locker here in San Diego, with the Nicklin family. I miss the big Underwater Photography Society (UPS) shows they used to have at the San Diego Civic Center every year. Michael Cousteau was Master of ceremonies one year. Now I mostly free-dive just because its faster and less equipment.

However, I did take my kids 12 and 10 on a free "Discover Diving" class at the Sports Chalet recently. They loved it. They love snorkeling and free diving. Apparently you can now get certified at the very young age of 10, with parent approval and level of maturity considered.

I don't own a computer, I still use the tables. Old school. However, resort diving, the wife and I stuck to couples near our size and stature that had computers. According to the tables we would have been bent and not had as much bottom time.

I've spent week after week commercial diving surveying San Diego Bay and Mission Bay for Eelgrass beds and then replanting Eeelgrass projects while working in environmental consulting. Talk about endless bottom time. The things you'll do just to alleviate the boredom (but can't say).

Cenote diving in the Yucatan is awesome! Experienced that on my honeymoon. Love Cozumel and Hawaii.

I probably should take a refresher course and learn the computers and mixed gas diving. It would be cool. I think diving is something that a person can do well into their late years just like Cousteau did.

Again I find it really relaxing (unless a white ever comes by). Then again there is The Shark Shield. http://www.sharkshield.com/




SLR, very impressive set up you have. Incredible.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jan 26, 2013 - 08:08pm PT

Nature's gunna be fishin' for sushi. . .

hee hee hee. . .
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 27, 2013 - 12:21am PT
""I'm pretty sure Locker doesn't Scuba Dive."...

Sort of true...

Sort of not...

My Cousin some many years back stuck his weight belt (he outweighed me by about 100lbs) and tank on yours truly, then pushed me off the boat...

I sunk to the bottom (about 25ft) and couldn't fuking breath through that piece of sh!t worth a fuk...

So I spit it out and then TRIED like hell to swim to the surface quickly discovering that the weight of the belt held me down...

Before I DROWNED, my cousin jumped in and pulled me to the surface with a HUGE apoplogy (I was only 14, he was in his 30's. Not the most responsible cousin... LOL!!!)...

So you see...

I DO have SOME "scuba diving" experience..."






More like DROWNING experience.
;-)


Sierra;
If you have to drop your tanks, does the BC drop with it?

Nature; I still think computers can go on the blink, and using the
Dive tables as long as you follow them, are more reliable and safe.

Maybe the comps have gotten better, but back in the 70s when they first came out, there was more decomp sickness cases for the Divers
that were using them than divers using the tables.
bit'er ol' guy

climber
the past
Jan 27, 2013 - 12:46am PT

W
H
A
T
?
Dr.Sprock

Boulder climber
I'm James Brown, Bi-atch!
Jan 27, 2013 - 12:46am PT
computer is just the dive shop squeezing money from people who put the gear in their closet for 20 years, which is 90 percent of the class.

hard to get into trouble with a 80 cu ft tank unless you do a bounce dive to 300 ft at monestary beach and get narced out.

i like scubapro jet fins and dacor big barrel snorkels,

regular back-pac

had a 400 dollar zeagle but someone stole it,

too much prep to dive with that thing,

like old school bac pac and may west with standardf weight belt,

shot belts are a pain, so skip those. they rust.


charlie brown was the instructor from divers dock sunnyvale.

ken down in mt view was the comp with the indoor pool.

charlie hid behind a rock while free diving and stuck a ling cod with his knife as it passed his view.

also drank coors underwater. great example for safety.

we used to take shrooms and lay on the bottom at carmel river beach.

just watch the fish swim overhead and the kelp weaver back and forth with the tide, tank lasts way long when you don't move,

we drove to cannery row in our wetsuits in a GTO convertible to get free refills, with the top down of course, people were gawkin, we were lit up,


Phil_B

Social climber
Hercules, CA
Jan 27, 2013 - 01:31am PT
Ha,

Looks like there are lots of folks out there who dive more technical than me. I'm just a guy who started diving again because we were in SE Asia. Hell, if you don't dive in the Philippines, you're missing a great opportunity.
You see the coolest animals in the tropics! <ribbon eel>
You see the coolest animals in the tropics! <ribbon eel>
Credit: Phil_B

I'm only a Nitrox Advanced diver. Would like to get a cert that allows me to pierce wrecks in places other than the Philippines.
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Jan 27, 2013 - 05:20am PT
+ 1 to Philippines. Lots of wildlife, lots of wrecks. Even a Spanish-American War vintage US Battleship. The USS NEW YORK.

I particularly like the wrecks of vintage 1860 - 1880. It's early mechanical, the old guys were still sorting out how to do arrange engines and propulsion machinery. Really incredible. I saw one, the engine was forward, the shaft was nearly the length of the ship.

Though my best wreck was a German WWII destroyer North of Scotland. That was amazing.

Here's part of one I lensed off Bermuda. The MARIE CELESTE sunk around 1864. A Paddle Wheel Blockade Runner.

Standing Paddle Wheel
Standing Paddle Wheel
Credit: John Duffield
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Jan 27, 2013 - 11:32am PT
Holy crap, that's an amazing contribution Sierra Ledge Rat, thanks for sharing it.

I've been nibbling on the idea of gearing up for some shallow, short dives, off the Oregon Coast, but am torn on doing it, as I'd probably be doing it solo. Any thoughts?
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 27, 2013 - 11:42am PT
" I'd probably be doing it solo. Any thoughts?"



Yeah.
NEVER Dive without a PARTNER!!!
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jan 27, 2013 - 11:50am PT
Hell, if you don't dive in the Philippines, you're missing a great opportunity.

And Philippino chicks are awesome..... for other opportunities as well... (:

...as I'd probably be doing it solo. Any thoughts?

Most of my rec/tech dives are solo.

Soloing is not something that you want to get into right away. You've got to have a firm grasp on your solo strategy first. You can have redundant everything except for your brain.

You've also got to be well-versed in managing all of your emergencies solo. Emergency procedures need to be second-nature if you are going below the waves alone.

I have a checklist of emergency drills, and I start every solo dive with a run through my drills. If the drills go poorly, then I just stay at 20 feet and drill. If the drills go well, then I proceed with my dive.

Drills:

1. Flooded mask - remove, replace, clear

2. Lost mask - find and don replacement mask

3. Lost regulator - sweep recovery and neck-touch recovery

4. Valve drills - if I am in doubles then I go through a full valve drill (left/right/isolator). If I am using only a single only my back, then I go through the drill with my stage cylinder, including turning on the valve, deployment of the regulator, then shutting down the stage and stowing the reg. I also make sure that I can reach the valve on my back.

5. Stuck drysuit inflator - quick disconnect of the inflator, and roll recovery (for too much air in the feet)

6. Stuck BC inflator - quick disconnect and dump

If I were to solo in Oregon's cold water, here is what I would do:

-Assume shore diving with a bit of walk to the water, so I would use a single steel cylinder on my back and carry an AL40 stage for back-up, rigged with a redundant 1st and 2nd stage regulator (as opposed to carrying twin steel cylinders on my back)

-Dry suit, which also gives me redundant buoyancy

-Carry a spare mask in my pocket

-Two computer or depth gauges

-Two bottom timers

-Two compasses

-Two cutting devices

-When I am soloing I also use a carbon monoxide meter to check my breathing gas for CO before I go head wet


moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Jan 27, 2013 - 11:59am PT
And Philippino chicks are awesome..... (:

Why did you say that. Now my wife will never let me go ;)

My dream trip is Galapagos. She agreed on it too. I just need to come up with the money. hahaha
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Jan 27, 2013 - 12:08pm PT
Your first Galapagos trip should prolly be snorkeling and hiking. More general. But it is amazing. Aren't many places you can swim with penguins.

Credit: John Duffield
moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Jan 27, 2013 - 12:12pm PT
Jelous. Seriously.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2013 - 03:48pm PT
Maybe the comps have gotten better

Ya think?
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 27, 2013 - 06:33pm PT



photo not found
Missing photo ID#286794
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Feb 22, 2013 - 04:19am PT
Am in North Sulawesi right now. Did 14 dives at Bunaken last week. F**ing awesome but could have used a magnifying glass for the small stuff.
Hope to get off to Lembeh Island in a few days for some muck diving.
If you ever want to dive Indonesia is the place to be. Already dreaming of a trip to Raja Ampat next year.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Feb 22, 2013 - 04:54am PT
Most of my diving has been in the Pacific - Hawaii, Okinawa, Philippines, Thailand, Australia, and Indonesia. Diving from shore sites like those in North Sulawesi are great, but there's still a lot of dynamiting and other destructive activities going on (or at least there was when I was there). If I were to get back into it I'd only be doing it at really remote sites on live aboards or with uncommon travel arrangements to shore sites where there just isn't a lot of human activity.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Feb 23, 2013 - 07:42pm PT
2 scuba divers die off Calif.'s Monterey Co. coast
RJNelson

climber
A few different places
Feb 23, 2013 - 09:56pm PT
I'm an avid climber and diver. If your looking for advice on equipment, definitely go for a weight intergrated BC. The convenience of having the weights in the BC is that it balances out your setup, and makes putting on/off much easier. Also more aerodynamic in the water so it's easier kicking, not to mention safer to drop in an emergency. As far as regulator goes. Upgrade 1st and 2nd at the same time. Sounds like your gear is old? Go with a balanced 1st and matching 2nd. They breath easier at any depth or PSI. I use the Atomic B2, kinda pricy, but balanced is well worth it. PM me if you have any other questions
mdavid

Big Wall climber
High Springs, FL
Feb 23, 2013 - 10:20pm PT
I'd second going with a Halcyon back plate and wing. I'm cave diving three times a week and find their gear is awesome.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
Feb 24, 2013 - 11:34pm PT
Commercial diving Loch Lomond Reservoir last summer  to repair aerator...
Commercial diving Loch Lomond Reservoir last summer to repair aerators
Credit: TomCochrane

Sony HDV EX-1 in Underwater Camera Housing
Sony HDV EX-1 in Underwater Camera Housing
Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

Credit: TomCochrane

TomC as safety diver/videographer
TomC as safety diver/videographer
Credit: TomCochrane
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Feb 25, 2013 - 03:58am PT
Am diving in Lembeh Straight Sulawesi right now.
Really industrial as we are near the port of Bintung. Lots of trash like paint cans, tires, on the bottom but some neat stuff lives in them and on the coral patches. This is the home of weird and wonderful macro stuff with new discoveries still being made. Some of the fish are even uglier than the garbage. True muck diving but like an awesome treasure hunt.
Truly a unique experience
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Feb 25, 2013 - 10:09am PT
I was reading about making cave diving photos this w/e.

Seems - to get any photo depth in zero light - you need a sensor, on your companions gear, that fires their Strobe at the same time as yours.

Said sensor needs to be at the top of his tank so it can see your strobe.

The author remarked, that at the bottom of popular cave routes, there are a ton of plastic knobs. Guess that must be from the first stage banging on the roof. Can't imagine hitting the overhead that hard but that's what he says. He mentioned that, cuz if your friend scrapes off your strobe sensor, it gets to be a really expensive sport.

Seems a bunch of my Scuba friends are getting into Cave Diving. Though, IIRC my fav dive buddy flunked her course.

For myself, I dunno. Looks like one of those things you get into all the way or leave it alone.
locker

Social climber
FukUville
Feb 25, 2013 - 10:11am PT


"My dream trip is Galapagos. She agreed on it too. I just need to come up with the money."...


Easy...

SuperTopo FUNDRAISER...

It's all the rave these days!!!...

;-)

miwuksurfer

Social climber
Mi-Wuk
Feb 25, 2013 - 01:45pm PT
The ink is still wet on my open water cert. I'm so stoked to get out. Love the photos and the trip reports.
Keep them coming. The accident reports, though grim, are good to read also, I belive.

Question: Do most of you prefer the wrist mounted computers or the computer and pressure guage mounted on a hose?
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2013 - 02:02pm PT
I prefer mine on the console. Though I know many that prefer the wrist mount. The nice thing about the console is integrate air is a lot less expensive.


And just wait locker - I'm going to mexico this summer to dive with Whale Sharks and part of the requirement is we do a fundraiser. All proceeds go back into "the cause" (awareness to the shark finning industry and putting a stop to that horrible industry). There will be prizes :P
kev

climber
A pile of dirt.
Feb 25, 2013 - 03:03pm PT
Nature,

Here are a few thoughts.

1) I'm not sure how old you are but if you're starting to loose any near visual acuity then the size of the font for the computer really matters.
I've got a newer oceanic (which will do multiple gas mixtures :) but it's hard for my eyes to read - ug.

2) Specific computer experiences
Aeris - they break and you should avoid them.
Sununto - seems to hold up pretty conservative algortithms.
Oceanic - some of the new ones have multiple algorithm choices for modeling nitrogen absorption and this allows you to choose how liberal or conservative you want it. My current on is an oceanic and it has survived about 140 hours in the last 16 months.

3) On the strobe question - if you get and ikelite housing buy a used ds125 strobe, if you don't get an ikelite housing get a S&S YS-D1 or Inon z240 type 4. If your shooting macro you probably will need a focus light.
For used gear try reef in florida - lots of used stuff on their website, also backscatter (CA) has some used stuff as does bluewater photo. Jack at Ocean Optical sales also has some used stuff from time to time but typically isn't advertised on his web site - also scuba board and wetpixel are good sources for used stuff.

kev

nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2013 - 04:42pm PT
thanks kev. I'm almost 47 and so far my eyesight is holding up. Though I'm noticing really small fonts are hard to read.

I've had an Oceanic for 12 years and it's held up well. It's very basic but it's easy to read. Doesn't do mixed gas though.

After consulting with my instructor I've decided that my first priority is a new BC. After that it'll be a computer. And then maybe a new reg.

The timing on the strobe info is perfect. I have my housing (it's a canon) and the fish eye lens is on order.

I'll check out some of those sites.
mynameismud

climber
backseat
Feb 25, 2013 - 07:42pm PT
I second the back plane and wing. I currently dive with a jacket type bc and it works fine. Had a Zeagle for a while. The scuba pro jacket is cleaner, more simple and more streamlined but does have less lift. I would love to have a back plane / wing setup and when I wear out my current bc that is the way I will go. Way less drag, very configurable and simple which is important in diving. Redundant, failsafe but simple.

I quit recording my dives when I starting showing my log book to folks (only when asked) and half my dives were solo and received tons of crap. Absolutely love solo night dives. Reminds me of being a kid and walking alone in the woods. Have to keep thinking I am not afraid of the dark, dang it I am a grown man no way I am afraid of the dark. I think the incredible amount of pressure about not diving solo is in some ways bad even though I do understand why folks do it. I strongly discourage people not to dive solo. But the result was me diving solo and not telling anyone where I was and what I was doing. It is very similar to free soloing, recognize what you are doing, minimize risk, stay within boundaries. In some ways it has made me a better diver in some ways worse. When I dive I think self-contained, I monitor my stuff and my environment and expect my partner to do the same. To me it seems some divers that are completely entrenched in the dive partner philosophy rely on those partners which I think is a dangerous thing to do in the ocean. It is very good to have a partner there and there are times I will not go in the ocean without one but I think it is good to be self reliant.

I really like my scuba pro computer and reg. I do not like computers that have integrated air. With an actual air gauge if your computer fails you at least you know how much air you have. Also really like the Air 2 and Do not think I would dive without it, simple and bomb proof. One simple aftermarket piece of gear that I got that I highly recommend is the full piece mouth piece. When it gets rough or whatever I can clamp down on it better and I have only lost my reg once and that is when getting picked up by a wave and slammed into some rocks which kinda knocked the wind out of me. My reg shot out of my mount but the Air2 was right there ( I had two partners that day) and thankfully my partner grabbed me while I was getting maytaged and pulled me deeper and handed me my reg. I also recommend getting a bc with at least two dump valves one on the shoulder and one down low at the bottom, I see the third dump valve on the Air2 as being optional even though it is there by default with an Air2 type setup.

Have fun out there but be safe.
mynameismud

climber
backseat
Feb 25, 2013 - 07:49pm PT
Some words that also stuck with me. I remember when I got my advanced card from my instructer. He congratulated me in the group. Then found me when I was off by myself, looked me hard in the eye and said "You know what this means (while pointed at my card then not waiting for an answer), absolutly nothing". He then walked off.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2013 - 07:51pm PT
The Air2 is a nice feature. One less hose to worry about. The shop I'm training with and will eventually be working at uses ScubaPro's as their "uniforms". Though I guess that means if I go with a ScubaPro BC with Air2 I also need up upgrade my reg to ScubaPro.


kev - what are your thoughts on the Ikelite AF35?
kev

climber
A pile of dirt.
Feb 25, 2013 - 10:20pm PT
Nature,

Here are some strobe/s100 ramblings - please ignore anyhting you already knew - I wasn't sure where you were at with the whole underwater photo thing.

So I had (well still do until I bother to sell it) an Pany LX-5 in an ikelite housing. I was using a ds125 via electrical sync. The damn thing was way to strong and I found the TTL metering was so/so. This caused me to set the strobe manually. It was pretty easy once I got the hang of it. So I'm not sure how important TTL really is for you. Plus the Cannon S100 does NOT support TTL in manual mode which is probably what you'll be shooting in most of the time.

Initially I suggested Ikelite strobe with Ikelite housing because I assumed the housing had an electrical sync cord/TTL circuit which is uber fast (recycle time is < 2 seconds). Well, it's not that the sync is fast but rather with electrical sync you're only dependent on the strobes recycle time which with the DS125/160s is way way fast. Using the camera's flash as your strobe trigger means you're limited by the S100 recycle time. So the big selling point of the ikelite DS125/160 (and maybe 51) is gone.

My current system uses a mirror to allow flash from my d7000 to pass down a fiber optic cable which is connected to my strobe which then interprets the preflash for TTL that way - essentially what ikelite is doing with their autoflash 35. With this camera/strobe combination it seems pretty good. I'd call a few stores and see what they've had that works well with the cannon, I know some of the sea and sea strobes and the Inon strobes will fire via your a mask over your cameras internal flash with a cable running from the mast to the strobe. Here's an example http://www.bluewaterphotostore.com/ys-02-flex-arm-package and here's a S&S camera/strobe compatibility chart link http://www.seaandsea.jp/products/strobe/compatibilitychart/a.html but again I really don't think your going to use much TTL.

A lot of people really like Inon, S&S and Ikelite - I've used 2 of the three myself and they've all got their little pros and cons. But I don't think you need the TTL. Focus on the amount of light not the TTL unless you really think you're NOT going to me shooting in manual. I wouldn't use anything with less power than the DS51.

Hope I haven't muddied the waters too much.

kev

climber
A pile of dirt.
Feb 25, 2013 - 10:22pm PT
Yeah the Air 2 is great until you have a panicked diver. If/when you go the Air2 route get an extra long hose for your primary so you can keep the panicked student/diver a reasonable distance away from you.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 25, 2013 - 11:00pm PT
I'm fairly new to underwater photography and most of my years of experience have been outdoors (little use of strobes).

I don't see the need for TTL - I'll just get use to manual adjustments from the get-go. I'm ok with the recycle time with the s100 - I don't have a choice give the housing I chose.

I'm figuring I'll be shooting in Manual (C) at first. Still trying to learn this camera. It's pretty complex for being so little.

thanks for the link to the YS-02. I'll probably debate on that one vs the AF35.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2013 - 01:49am PT
bought the YS-02 with flex handle.
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Mar 4, 2013 - 06:08pm PT
If you like photography you must go to Indonesia. The sites there are legendary. I just got back from several weeks diving at Bunaken and Lembeh and am already thinking about Raja Ampat next year.
The comparison to other diving I have done is: You can climb a scruffy route on a choss crag. Yes it is climbing and it may be fun. Then compare it to the Nose or Astroman and you know this is a totally different arena.
Lembeh in particular is awesome and probably features the most unusual creatures you will ever see under water.
Check out videos on Youtube and you may want to book at a resort immediately! The dive resorts are great with 1 guide to 1-2 clients. They do everything for you ( twice I had to turn on my air though) and are there to find the wonderful things you want to see. Every dive featured critters I had never seen before and discoveries are still being made so no one knows everything that is down there. Especially exciting when you spot things before the guide does. Just like a giant treasure hunt.
Do it
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Mar 4, 2013 - 06:38pm PT
I'm fairly new to underwater photography and most of my years of experience have been outdoors (little use of strobes).

I don't see the need for TTL - I'll just get use to manual adjustments from the get-go. I'm ok with the recycle time with the s100 - I don't have a choice give the housing I chose.

I'm figuring I'll be shooting in Manual (C) at first. Still trying to learn this camera. It's pretty complex for being so little.

Learning the camera is easy. It's the bouyancy that's problematic. Very much like texting and driving. The camera is devouring your attention. I've dived with some groups where they get hostile towards the idea. I had a 3 dives a day for a week with one of the best in the business. So I'm not bouncing all over the dive site, though I've been known to take off and my partner has to follow me. Here's a shot I took of him.

Dan
Dan
Credit: John Duffield
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 4, 2013 - 07:49pm PT
I'm getting a lot of practice with buoyancy. Part of the DCS requirement is being able to demonstrate all the open water skills while maintaining neutral buoyancy. Some of them are pretty tricky. Switching to a rear inflation BC and getting the integrated weights just right is also really helping.
mynameismud

climber
backseat
Mar 4, 2013 - 08:16pm PT
Nature
...if I go with a ScubaPro BC with Air2 I also need up upgrade my reg to ScubaPro.

Your primary Reg can be whatever you choose.

The hose on my primary is not real long but is a bit longer than normal. I have had to hand off my primary once while I used the Air2. It worked ok. If I was a Dive Master, doing Rescue Diving or Cave diving I would probably change my setup and go with a secondary with a long hose.

Other tips would be to learn to dive inverted (head down). Half the cool stuff out there is underneath something. Dive with as little weight as you can. It definitely eases buoyancy but if you take a beginner out extra weight can be helpful. Simplify/streamline your setup as much as possible while still being safe.

As far as photography goes.. If you dive with a photographer you may as well learn to dive solo :) One of my primary dive partners is a photog and he inevitably floats off by himself. He dives dry, I dive wet and would not only die of boredom but would freeze to death if I stuck by his side at all times. He takes pics and I swim around and find stuff. For the most part we do keep tabs on each other, the arrangement works.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 5, 2013 - 06:12pm PT
I've got all my components now. This will be fun.

canon s100, canon housing, Sea & Sea YS-02, Fantasea BigEye fish eye lens.

Credit: nature


Credit: nature


Credit: nature
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2013 - 11:24pm PT
it works!
Credit: nature
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 7, 2013 - 12:00am PT
My girlfriend and I just got back from 3 weeks of diving on the Kohala coast of the Big Island, Hawaii. (Also did a bunch of caving.)

We did the night manta ray dive off Kona. It was one of the most spectacular dives that I have ever done (and I have 400+ dives on 5 continents, including some cave diving). The diver's lights attract plankton, and the manta rays swoop in to feed on the plankton. With the lights and bubbles and manta rays, it is an utterly surreal and spectacular experience.

Here is an excellent video from youtube showing a manta dive (not my video)


nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 7, 2013 - 12:03am PT
Sierra... were you in the group where the dolphin came in and one of the camera men removed a hook and some fishing line?

http://earthsky.org/earth/video-of-dolphin-seeking-help-from-divers


also check out:
http://www.bluespheremedia.com/2013/02/mantas-last-dance/

Edit: never mind, i realized the dolphin rescue was before you got there.
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 7, 2013 - 12:27am PT
Holy crap - that video of the dolphin encounter brought tears to my eyes.
Anastasia

climber
Home
Mar 7, 2013 - 12:34am PT
The air 2 sucks when you do have a panic diver. I had to hit a guy with my regulator to get him to stop grabbing the air 2 out of my mouth and take the dang regulator. Though I do like it as a third option. I also had a spare air tank.

Remember, I use to dive master classes so it was part of my job to help others. It was a very interesting and intense experience. Probably why I can handle bad situations so calmly while the everyday silly stuff can rattle me.
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 7, 2013 - 12:36am PT
Holy crap - that video of the dolphin encounter brought tears to my eyes.

Yeah... same here and I've watched it a few times with the same result.

Their brain functions in ways I don't believe we can even begin to imagine.

Then there was this one:
http://www.globalanimal.org/2010/11/25/happy-thanksgiving-humpback-whale-gives-thanks-to-divers-for-rescuing-her/24717/


While I was playing around in the pool ton with my camera I had a chance to test drive an aqualung bc with their new i3 system. Not so sure about all the moving parts but the control you get on buoyancy is very very impressive.

next month I'll get a chance to test drive the poseidon rebreather.
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 7, 2013 - 02:33am PT
Yeah the Air 2 is great until you have a panicked diver. If/when you go the Air2 route get an extra long hose for your primary so you can keep the panicked student/diver a reasonable distance away from you.

That's one of the reasons I went with the Hogarthian philosophy. My primary regulator is on a 7-foot hose. When someone takes the regulator out of my mouth (which is what I plan for) they get plenty of hose with which to work.

(The 7-foot length comes from cave diving, so that you pass single-file through restrictions and still share air.)

My backup is on a short bungee around my neck, where I can always find it. This is the standard setup for all technical divers, and it works perfectly well for recreational diving, too. I like it because I don't have to change my gear or configuration when I move back and forth between rec and tech diving.

A cave diver in Mexico
Primary regulator is on a 7-foot yellow hose. &#40;I use a black hose....
Primary regulator is on a 7-foot yellow hose. (I use a black hose.) The backup regulator is on a bungee around the neck.
Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat


couchmaster

climber
pdx
Mar 7, 2013 - 09:32am PT
Thanks for the advice Mr Rat, it's appreciated.

Ledge Rat said:
"Most of my rec/tech dives are solo.

Soloing is not something that you want to get into right away. You've got to have a firm grasp on your solo strategy first. You can have redundant everything except for your brain.

You've also got to be well-versed in managing all of your emergencies solo. Emergency procedures need to be second-nature if you are going below the waves alone.

I have a checklist of emergency drills, and I start every solo dive with a run through my drills. If the drills go poorly, then I just stay at 20 feet and drill. If the drills go well, then I proceed with my dive.

Drills:

1. Flooded mask - remove, replace, clear

2. Lost mask - find and don replacement mask

3. Lost regulator - sweep recovery and neck-touch recovery

4. Valve drills - if I am in doubles then I go through a full valve drill (left/right/isolator). If I am using only a single only my back, then I go through the drill with my stage cylinder, including turning on the valve, deployment of the regulator, then shutting down the stage and stowing the reg. I also make sure that I can reach the valve on my back.

5. Stuck drysuit inflator - quick disconnect of the inflator, and roll recovery (for too much air in the feet)

6. Stuck BC inflator - quick disconnect and dump

If I were to solo in Oregon's cold water, here is what I would do:

-Assume shore diving with a bit of walk to the water, so I would use a single steel cylinder on my back and carry an AL40 stage for back-up, rigged with a redundant 1st and 2nd stage regulator (as opposed to carrying twin steel cylinders on my back)

-Dry suit, which also gives me redundant buoyancy

-Carry a spare mask in my pocket

-Two computer or depth gauges

-Two bottom timers

-Two compasses

-Two cutting devices

-When I am soloing I also use a carbon monoxide meter to check my breathing gas for CO before I go head wet"
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Mar 7, 2013 - 10:16am PT
next month I'll get a chance to test drive the poseidon rebreather.

How are you getting this? I think I would like to do it. Was looking at going back to Divetech, but maybe somewhere else would work.

Here's on of my Scapa Buds suited up. As I age, the lighter equipment becomes more attractive to me. Staggering around the deck with two cans of backgas and a couple of deco in a heavy sea, in a dry suit really sucks the energy out.

rebreather
rebreather
Credit: John Duffield

couchmaster

climber
pdx
May 5, 2013 - 09:22am PT
Not that a reminder is needed, yesterdays news. 3 Abalone divers died in 3 separate incidents over the weekend off the Ca. coast. Wow. That's 4 deaths total in 8 days. Of note, tanks are not utilized in an effort to keep it sporting.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/3-sea-snail-divers-killed-over-the-weekend-in-separate-accidents-off-northern-california-coast/2013/04/29/7a3eac52-b0d1-11e2-9fb1-62de9581c946_singlePage.html?tid=obinsite
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
May 5, 2013 - 06:25pm PT
hmmm.. hasn't hit A&I yet

Five Star accident thread with a happy ending.

http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/431107-bent-belize-blue-hole-incident.html
nature

climber
Boulder, CO
Topic Author's Reply - May 5, 2013 - 06:28pm PT
John - I missed your question regarding the rebreather.... My local dive shop is doing a demo on this later this month. They have one on hand right now. It's a pretty cool little unit.
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