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Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 6, 2010 - 01:40pm PT
It was graded 5.5, A2 in Glenn's 1967 guide to climbing at Squamish. The description:
Start about 100 feet left of a huge, left-facing corner about 100 yards south of Kiddie Corner. Climb an obvious and crack line for 2 leads to a good tree platform (free, only a few moves are 5.5). Traverse right on a slabby ramp, then climb 50 feet of more broken rock to a very solid, gnarled tree. Nail a 40 foot overhanging corner past a roof and climb (5.5) the jam crack beyond to 2 belay bolts.

The last lead is 170 feet long and requires hardware to fit the 6 1/2 inch to 8 inch crack. The first ascent party used 1 1/4 inch diameter aluminum pipe sawed into assorted lengths; about 30 pipes are needed. There is one bolt in place just beneath the overhang and good belay trees at the end of the route.

In addition to the pipes. take a selection of 15 angles up to 2 inches, a few horizontals, a couple of large bongs, and a 200 foot rope. The route will take one day. From the 2 belay bolts it is possible to rappel directly down, using 2 ropes.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 7, 2010 - 01:19pm PT
In Gordie Smaill's (edit) 1975 guide, Pipeline was graded 5.5 A2 or 5.10 incomplete.
Start 100 feet left of a huge left facing corner about 100 yards south of Kiddie Corner. Free obvious bush and cracks for two leads to a tree ledge. Traverse right on a ramp then up 50 feet past broken rock to a twisted tree. Free an overhanging corner and jam to belay bolts. The original ascent used pipes to aid this next long lead to top. A cloud of 5.10 or 5.11 surrounds this last bit. 25 inch arms appear to be mandatory here. Protection in this offsize crack is good since some pipes have been left in along with a bolt.
This strongly suggests that someone had either made a second ascent, using less aid, or had tried to do it free, and got at least to the base of the big crack. There were several good offwidths climbers around then, including Gordie himself, Al Givler, Steve Sutton, and Hugh Burton.
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Sep 7, 2010 - 01:39pm PT
Alan Kearney, in his North Cascades Select guidebook, alleges that Washington climbers in the 50s or 60s used "plumber's helpers" (adjustable lengths of pipe) to protect wide cracks and that these were the true forerunners of modern tube chocks.

Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 7, 2010 - 05:51pm PT
Interesting. Leif at least had considerable contact with Seattle climbers in the early to mid 1960s, and might have heard something. But then, the history of climbers cramming all sorts of odd objects into cracks goes much further back. The bicycle crank in Llanberis Pass in the 1930s, probably stuff in the Dolomites even earlier.

When Pipeline was done in 1966, the cliff it's on was informally known as the Squaw. The other subsidiary crags at Squamish are the Papoose and the Malemute, a bit of a theme. Anyway, the cliff was renamed Slhanay a few years ago, that being considered a more acceptable term by Squamish's First People. I don't know if it's an official name with the CPCGN.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Sep 7, 2010 - 06:24pm PT
Anyway, the cliff was renamed Slhanay a few years ago, that being considered a more acceptable term by Squamish's First People. I don't know if it's an official name with the CPCGN.
It's not official.
gf

climber
Sep 7, 2010 - 06:49pm PT
Nails -we will know it is official when the billboard at the casino by hwy 99 tells us so.
Hey are we still on when Indian summer shows up?

gf
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Sep 7, 2010 - 09:30pm PT
The new name for the Squaw is bogus, I wonder who the hell came up with it?
We are definitely going to die of political correctness.

Reminds me of a quote attributed to the late Sam Kinnison; "The only reason she (a prominent African American actress who starred in the Color Purple) became famous was because the whole world decided not to hurt her feelings.

Back to wide cracks.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 7, 2010 - 10:41pm PT
Are we supposed to call it "First Peoples' Summer" now?
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Sep 7, 2010 - 11:15pm PT
Chief wrote: The new name for the Squaw is bogus, I wonder who the hell came up with it?
"The Chief" newspaper for June 6, 2008, quotes Kevin McLane aqs saying, "I suggested to Donna [Billy, of the Squamish Nation] about a year ago that if Squamish Nation wanted to choose a new name, I could get it established with BC Parks and the district and make sure it appeared in future climbing guide." They chose Slhanay. The paper also says, "The Squaw word has rankled with Squamish Nation for many years, and as a result it dropped off the map as far as government was concerned."

Neither Slhanay nor the Squaw is an official name. Nor, for that matter, are the Malemute or Papoose.

I have no idea how widely, if at all, Kevin consulted within the climbing community.

Back to wide chocks....
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Sep 7, 2010 - 11:20pm PT
Anders I think that's a great idea. FIRST PEEEPLES SUMMER 'cept here on the wet left coast we can call it the damn end of the damn summer and the damn pause before the GODDAAAAAAMN rains !!!!

Huge fabulousness to Glenn for that story & pix. Nice to see all the posters since it were Squamish folks jumping for joy.......not that Tricouni ever did that...... ( Glenn -PUN INTENDED ....... )

Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 7, 2010 - 11:36pm PT
Tricouni has rather more knowledge of these matters than me, but I'll try.

The B.C. government, then the NDP, decided in 2000 to change offical place names in the province with the word "squaw", as it was considered by some to be insulting. The First Nations Summit and Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs asked that such names be changed. ("Squaw" is in any case probably an Algonquian word, not found in Coast Salish or any other local language here.) There were then 11 official names in the province with the word "squaw". Other provinces, and states in the US, had previously made similar changes. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2000/12/09/bc_squaw001209.html

The Access Society (www.access-society.ca) suggested in its newsletter in 2004 that the Squamish Nation be asked what they'd like the cliff to be named, even if unofficially. A newsletter which went to many addresses in Squamish. It just took a while to happen.
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:hpT5SREfa6cJ:old.access-society.ca/archives/accessnews/accessnews_38.doc+squamish+chief+anders+ourom+squaw&cd=8&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Sep 7, 2010 - 11:40pm PT
I have no idea how widely, if at all, Kevin consulted within the climbing community.

As much as usual.

If were going to quit using the term squaw, then let's sh#t can the term Indian (as in Indian Summer or Cowboys and Indians) cause we're no where near India and my Cokum ate beavertails not chapattis.

Back to Pipeloads
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Sep 7, 2010 - 11:49pm PT
Squaw" is in any case probably an Algonquian word, not found in Coast Salish or any other local language here.

It's also the word for woman in the Chinook jargon, which WAS used here extensively locally for something like 200 years. It was taken from Algonquian for Chinook, true, but every other word in that made-up language was also taken from other languages - Cree, Salish, English, French, you name it. Chinook had an extremely successful run of things but is almost vanished now.

Klahowya tillikum!
skykilo

Trad climber
Vancouver, BC
Sep 8, 2010 - 12:02am PT
Thanks for the story Tricouni, I loved it.

And nice work on the FFSA, Grug.

I could barely haul myself up that thing with a VG9 and I was feeling it for days after that. I need to jump on it again; my scabs are gone now anyway. Long sleeves next time for sure.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 8, 2010 - 12:14am PT
I had no idea that Drew was also a philologist, but shouldn't be surprised. :-)

Use of the loan-word "squaw" in an introduced trade jargon didn't make it a word that was part of the local languages.

What's a "VG9", and who is our new friend skykilo?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Sep 8, 2010 - 12:53am PT
It's also the word for woman in the Chinook jargon,


A Voice Great Within Us, the story of Chinook ( Charles Lillard with Terry Glavin , Transmontanus ) says the word kloochman is woman or female in Chinook jargon. Wiki ( yeah , yeah ) cites Algonquin language as the source for "squaw" and I suggest it's possible distribution external to the area of influence of Algonquin languages have happened by literature as well as by traders who thought of First Nations women as inferior.

As for the crag, I dunno. The new name may work for local FN & I suppose climbers could get used to it. It doesn't matter really... the lines of ascent on the cliff remain the same - named by the first ascentionists.

Perhaps it will be like that mountain near Canmore which is the mountain-formerly-known-as-Chinaman's-peak.

The-crag-once-known-as-Squaw-then-as-Slahaynay-now-as-the-crag-with-no-name-north-of-the-Stawamus-Chief.

Revisionists!
Chief

climber
The NW edge of The Hudson Bay
Sep 8, 2010 - 01:04am PT
Revisionists!

Exactly!
gf

climber
Sep 8, 2010 - 01:45am PT
yeah!
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Sep 8, 2010 - 01:46am PT
For real ! ! !
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Sep 8, 2010 - 01:52am PT
Antidisestablishmentarianists!
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