help climbers visciously attacked in Peru

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Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:21pm PT
Wow, you really are whack, Riley. I have several TRs that are not labelled in the trip reports section (climb a lot of the same stuff you mention, actually), I'm in somebody else's TR of Darkstar, I post climbing photos fairly frequently (a lot more than a dozen photos, learn how to scroll dumb ass), and I don't even OWN a gun genius. I also notice you have at least one picture of a gun in your photos, you are clearly a gun nut by your typical logic. If you looked up the context of my "extensive collection" of gun photos you would see that I'm not a gun nut. But you're a prejudiced wind bag too busy to bother with the truth.

Take your meds, I know you have access ;). Yayayayayaya!!!
chill

climber
between the flat part and the blue wobbly thing
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:21pm PT
JLP said
Latin America = giant sh#t hole.
Not in my limited experience. I have met many great people in Mexico, Costa Rica and Peru. Not saying they aren't there, just haven't run across them. Worst I have been treated was some newspaper seller who didn't think my Spanish was good enough. He was surly to me. :(
prickle

Gym climber
globe,az
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:23pm PT
these are the risks one takes when traveling in wild and wonderful south america
JLP

Social climber
The internet
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:24pm PT
I assume they were trespassing and when told to leave, the people of the village didn't think they were leaving.
I didn't get that at all from the story, but I could see the possible expectation of some sort of overnight parking fee getting out of hand.

Spin it all however you want. There wasn't a problem until some Peruvians decided they wanted the American's money.

Asking for documents is simply the first step in extortion. You often end up buying them back for no real reason, even from the police and military. They were prudent to not give them up, but who knows what else happened.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:28pm PT
I've run into more than a few malditos in Central America with no ill affects. I've found that a smile, confidence, deference, an awareness of your surroundings, and a sharp look in your eye keeps you safe in most cases, even if your Spanish is mas o menos.

All that said, the party concerned had driven through Latin America for several months. I'm guessing that they had a good understanding of where they were and a decent handle on the language.

It seems like an extortion gone very wrong. Plain and simple.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:28pm PT
Hypocrites . Some go vacationing in countries that are in utter turmoil like most in South America, and Mexico- sipping the margaritas in touristaville while 30 miles away lie fifty fresh dead bodies from the latest cartel moves. Or some go "hiking" on a border of two countries at war then whine that your in the shyt. I have a friend that has a lot down on the beach -pacific side and even he is having difficulty going down there as bribe costs have risen dramatically. Yes he has to bribe his way through the various locales controlled by banditos most likely cartel wings.
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:32pm PT
Maybe I shouldn't have pulled up this thread as I'm in the San Francisco airport flying to Delhi.

Generalizations based on somebody's bad experience are often limited. During my time living in Yosemite, it's been one of the safest places from crime around and disease is far from a worry.

Yet around the times that poor gal was beheaded in Foresta, and lately after the headlines proclaimed Hanta Virus, people sent me messages as if I were living in Dante's inferno!

Yes there are Hells everywhere in each country.

One thing I don't buy much about any country, that there are neigborhood where everyone is accepting of mass beating and robbery for the sake of greed. That's unlikely.

But there are mass standards where people take mass offense. I'm told in India, if you accidentally hit somebody in your car, you better just get out of there because it's very possible the locals will beat you up as a matter of course.

Peace

karl
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:32pm PT
You clearly don't care, Riley Whiner ;)!!!!

You argue that we don't know what happened and then that they were irresponsible Americans after school children. You'll squirm whichever way you can to make some point at all, no matter how pointless.

Speaking of ugly mugs... uh, you seen yourself? You like Loki on a bender.

Done with your prejudiced ass, chumpsky!
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:35pm PT
Hypocrites . Some go vacationing in countries that are in utter turmoil like most in South America, and Mexico- sipping the margaritas in touristaville while 30 miles away lie fifty fresh dead bodies from the latest cartel moves. Or some go "hiking" on a border of two countries at war then whine that your in the shyt. I have a friend that has a lot down on the beach -pacific side and even he is having difficulty going down there as bribe costs have risen dramatically. Yes he has to bribe his way through the various locales controlled by banditos most likely cartel wings.

Ron, when was the last time you were in Central or South America?

Or, are you just pretending to have a first hand knowledge of how things are 'down there'?

Armchair knowledge gets you nowhere other than deeper into your armchair.
WBraun

climber
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:36pm PT
When we were down in South America Bolivia, Columbia, Brazil and Peru it wasn't until we got into Peru that we started getting problems.

The fuking Peruvians were thieves and we constantly were getting ripped off.

We had to constantly guard and watch our stuff.

We needed body guards in one area with machine guns to protect us from the cocaine cartel.

Those cocaine cartel fukers blew up all the bridges in that area.

When we landed at the small air strip we had to have military protection there also.

They will kill Americans in certain areas of Peru because the Americans were eradicating their drug fields with their "War on Drugs" program.

They hate Americans in certain areas, so beware.

Cuzco is relatively safe but outside the city you have to be careful of thieves, robbers and general fuk heads everywhere.
couchmaster

climber
pdx
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:37pm PT
Well, no one down there messes with Donini......



Fund is currently over $17,000. Now they have enough to continue on to Argentina and onwards for more adventure while you all go back to work in dark offices. Woot! Good times.


"Nightmare in Peru
Posted on January 3, 2013 by adventureamericas

As many people are already aware, Jed and I and my sister in law, Jenny have been through a very traumatic experience here in Peru. I wanted to put this out there to first of all let everyone know that we are safe and recovering in Cusco. We have suffered injuries, but we will all be able to recover fully physically. Below is an account of the incident written up by Jenny to an agency who is set up to help travelers who experience violence abroad. We have yet to hear back from them. We have had a lot requests from people who want to help. We have a meeting with the tourist police, Cusco police, Consolate in Cusco and the police from the small town this afternoon. Based on what we learn from this, we will update you on ways you could help. Thank you for all your support and please share the story epecially to any travelers.



Hello,

My name is Jennifer Lynne Wolfrom. I am a US citizen, a resident of the state of Wyoming, currently visiting Cuzco, Peru and the surrounding areas and I am a victim of an act of extreme violence towards myself, my brother (Joseph Palmer Wolfrom III), and my sister in law (Meghan Moore Doherty). Joseph and Meghan have been driving for nine months from the United States through Central and South America, camping almost every night in their truck camper and have not yet experienced any violence or danger until this situation which occurred from December 29 to December 30, 2012. I flew into Cuzco, Peru on December 22, 2012 to meet my brother and his wife for a 10-day vacation. We stayed in Cuzco for a few days and then went into the mountains to hike a portion of the Asungate Mountain trek. We were in the mountains from December 25 to December 29.



On December 29, 2012, we left the mountains to drive back to Cuzco and towards our next destination of Macchu Picchu. It was getting dark and we knew that driving in the dark was dangerous, so we pulled down a dirt road to camp in the camper on the back of their truck. We pulled into a flat spot near a bridge in the village of Pallcca in the region of Ocongate, Peru at about 6:30 PM. We were drinking two beers between the three of us because it was my 30th birthday and we were celebrating. We were almost immediately approached by two village residents, who were friendly and who we asked if it was ok to park and camp where we had. They said yes. Soon, the two men were blowing whistles and using their cell phones to alert their friends of our presence and many more village residents started gathering around us, including the man who they called the Presidente. We recognized that he was the leader of the community and Meghan asked him directly if we could camp there and he said Yes. We were soon surrounded by indigenous village people who started asking us to give them our documents. We refused to show them our documents as they weren´t Policia and we were getting nervous about their pushiness and decided to leave. We told them we would leave and got into the truck. They wouldn´t let my brother shut his door and started picking up rocks. Joseph finally got his door shut and we drove off quickly in the opposite direction of where we came hoping that the road would lead us away.



The road ended at a school about 10 minutes after we started driving. There was a man there and we asked him if we could camp and he said no, so we had to turn around and start driving back towards where we first encountered the mob. Soon we were approached by two motor bikes coming from the village and many people on foot. They started approaching the vehicle and we asked them if we could please leave. They said they would not let us leave and then started throwing rocks at the truck and building a rock blockade on the road in front of us. We drove over the first blockade and there were villagers up on the hill above the road continuing to throw rocks at the truck. They threw a large rock through the passenger window, breaking it and hitting me in the face and cutting my jaw. They also threw a rock through the driver’s side window, hitting my brother. We soon were met with another large road blockade of boulders that we could not drive through. At this blockade they threw rocks at the windshield and destroyed it. We veered off the road to try to drive around the blockade and got stuck in a huge ditch and could not drive anymore. We were being bombarded with rocks and had to escape from the vehicle. We had two cans of bear spray between the three of us so we used that in self-defense to be able to get out of the truck to start running from the village. We got out of the truck and started running and were immediately attacked by villagers who were throwing rocks at our heads and chasing us with blinding flashlights and sticks. It very much seemed like a planned organized attack with each of the villagers blowing whistles signaling other villagers to come out and join the chase. There were at least 30 people chasing us and throwing rocks at us at one point. We were running for our lives for between 30 minutes to an hour through the village hills and rivers. We were each struck multiple times by rocks in the head and all over our bodies. We eventually were surrounded by villagers who continued to beat us until they decided to bring us back to the Presidente of the village. We were forced to walk back to meet the Presidente where we pleaded with him to let us go. At this point we were all bleeding severely from our heads and Joseph´s front teeth were knocked out and his eye blundered shut by a rock. It was raining and freezing and my brother had lost a shoe running through a river. After a long discussion between the villagers and the presidente, he demanded that we be forced to walk about a mile in the freezing rain back up to the village school. We told them that we would just leave and they could have all of our stuff, but they would not let us leave. During that time I was beaten in the head with a large board, Meghan was kicked in her back extremely hard, and rocks continued to be thrown at us.



At the village school we were initially surrounded by at least 40 of the men, women, and children of the village who all addressed the Presidente with their ideas of what they wanted to do with us. Many of the women and men were screaming that they wanted the village to kill us. We kept apologizing, pleading, and explaining ourselves in Spanish, but they would not listen and started to whip us with the ropes that they use to whip their animals. We were whipped and beaten for a few hours in between sessions of interrogation. They told us that we should have given them our documents, but we explained that typically we did not give non-official policia our documents. Many of the villagers were angry about us using the bear spray (mace), but we explained that it was self-defense and we only used it after being attacked with rocks and barricaded, forcing us to crash the truck. We told them we had been very scared when they attacked us in the truck with rocks and we apologized over and over for the miscommunication. During this time at the school we were forced to separate and they stripped us of our possessions on our persons which included my iPhone 5, my brother and sister in law´s driver´s licenses and debit cards. After a few hours of standing in the freezing rain, being whipped by villagers numerous times, and screamed at in their local language, we continued to plead for our lives, shivering and bleeding, and they eventually shut us inside the school. We again apologized and pleaded to leave without any of our belongings.



After less than an hour of being shut in the school, we were again brought out to circle of villagers of over 33 people (I counted at least 33 people that I could see but there were many in the back ground- including young children). We immediately saw that there were at least three villagers that had at least three guns, one that we know was a 20 or 12 gauge shot gun. We tried to shield ourselves from the guns and again pleaded for them not to kill us. We were forced into the middle of the circle by men holding whips and we were held at gun point while again the villagers addressed the Presidente with their stories and ideas for our lives. At least one gun shot was shot towards us in the circle. The man with the 20 or 12 guage shot gun seemed to be an unofficial police or security guard for the village. We told him our story and spent another few hours in the middle of the circle while they decided what to do with us. It was at this point that lights were shined on our injuries and the villagers could see the extent of their violent acts. There was more discussion between the villagers and we were whipped again, with my brother taking most of the beating while trying to protect us. This last portion of the village gathering was photographed and recorded by many of the villagers. They were shining bright lights in our eyes, blinding us and taking pictures of our bloody faces and bodies, and recording the conversations on their phones. After another period of conversation and pleading, we were led to a table where we saw that they had written up their version of a story that they wanted us to sign for the police. Their accident report, written in Spanish, essentially said that we had been drinking and crashed our car, which is how the car got destroyed and how we got our injuries. However, the extent of our injuries and the condition of the car far surpasses anything that could happen by driving into a grassy ditch. They also pulled out all of our legal documents that they had stolen from the car, showed us they had them, and then confiscated them again. They still possess these documents.



We were convinced that the only way we would survive was to sign the report and assure the villagers that we would tell the police that it was a car accident that caused the damage to the truck and the injuries to our bodies. Once we convinced them that we would go along with their story, they had us sign the document and ink print our fingerprints. At around 5 am, after nearly 11 hours of being attacked, chased, beaten, whipped, and held at gun point without food, sleep, or water, we were led back to the truck. All of the windows and the windshield of the truck had been broken and the camper had been broken into and all of our belongings and documents were either stolen or thrown into the muddy ditch. We were told to wait for the police before we tried to get our truck out of the ditch. There were at least 15 villagers that stood with us at the truck until the police came. These villagers made us keep telling them that we would tell the police that it was an accident. At about 6:00 am, a man came who claimed he was the police and asked us to tell him what happened. He was clearly not a real policeman so we told him the same story that was written in the report to satisfy the villagers who were watching closely over us. This man tried to convince us to go back to the school to use a phone to call the hospital, but we refused because we felt it would bring another attack on our lives. At about 7:30 am four Policia National came to the scene of the accident. We told them the same story about crashing our truck and the policemen very clearly did not believe it. The Policia National took photos of every aspect of the accident, including the condition of the truck, the scene of the accident which very clearly shows the boulder barricade that the village set up to trap us, and close-up photos of our head injuries. The policemen helped us get our truck unstuck and we were escorted out in police vehicles at around 8:00 am. We were met by an ambulance that we were told was going to transport us to the city of Cuzco, which is what we wanted as there is better medical care there and we would feel much safer there as it was further away from the village. The police had told us that they would escort the ambulance to the city of Cuzco and would drive our truck to Cuzco so that we could get it fixed. Meanwhile, on the way out of the village that we were attacked in, the police picked up a truckload of villagers who could have very well been part of our attack and brought them along with them to the same town they were escorting us to. We felt extremely unsafe.



That morning of December 30, 2012, we were brought to the town of Ocongate, Peru and asked to get out of the ambulance. We said no, that we wanted to go to Cuzco and they told us they had to clean our wounds in the Ocongate medical clinic and then we would be brought to Cuzco. While we were being treated in Ocongate, which included about 100 stitches between the three of us (most of these stitches addressing head injuries), we kept requesting to be taken to Cuzco by either the police or the ambulance. The story kept changing and soon it became apparent that we were not going to be taken to Cuzco. We had asked in the clinic to be connected to someone at the US Embassy and finally a member of the policia connected us to Amy Bakal at the US Consulate in Cuzco. We explained our situation to Amy and told her we felt very unsafe in the town that we were in. We then found a translator and had the translator tell the policia our exact account of what happened. Once we had been able to tell our story to the US Consulate and to the policia national, we started getting better treatment and were eventually taken from the medical clinic to the police station where they fed us and allowed us to get clothes out of the truck to change into as we had been sitting in bloody, muddy, wet clothing for almost 24 hours at that point. We signed an initial police report that was written by the policia national in the Spanish language in the town of Ocongate. We have copies of this police report. We left the town of Ocongate at 6:30 pm and were brought by the policia national to Cuzco. We were promised by the mayor of the village that our truck would be brought to Cuzco after the investigation by the policia. However, when we met the consulate that night in Cuzco, our policia national escorts told the consulate that they would not be driving the truck to Cuzco.



The past few days, which should have been a time for us to mentally process what happened and regain strength, have been almost as tiring as the attack itself. We have spent at least 10 – 12 hour each day in different medical clinics being examined since we were not brought to the correct medical facility in Cuzco immediately after the attack. Without the truck we have had to take taxi cabs from each medical clinic, one which we were mandated to visit by the police which was an hour outside of the city we are currently staying in. We have not been able to eat properly as all of our time has been waiting for and meeting with doctors and trying to figure out how to access our money since all but one of our debit cards were stolen. We are staying in an overpriced hotel that is supposed to give us breakfast, but has refused serving us each morning. With all of our time spent in more important areas we have had not time to look for a different place to stay.





We spent yesterday, December 31, meeting with the Amy at the US Consulate and getting medical treatment at the Clinica San Jose in Cuzco, Peru. This treatment included checking our stitches and bruises, x-rays for my sister in law, and a cat scan for my brother. We were prescribed antibiotics and pain killers by the doctor. My brother will also need extensive dental work as four of his front teeth are either knocked out or severely damaged.



We have an appointment to meet with a legal doctor tomorrow, January 2, 2013, who will examine our injuries in order to be used in court testimonies. We are meeting with the police from Ocongate, the police from Cuzco, and Amy Bakal with the US Consulate on Thursday, January 3, to submit an official statement for the police report. I was supposed to fly back to the United States tomorrow, January 2, 2013, morning, but my passport, license, and all my money and debit cards were stolen during the attack. After the attack, I do not feel comfortable traveling alone to Lima to get to the Embassy so my brother and sister in law be will be accompanying me up to Lima after we make our statements to the police on Thursday over the weekend so that I can get my emergency passport and fly back to the United States early next week.



This situation has not only been extremely traumatic both mentally and physically, but has also become a huge financial burden for the three of us. We had thousands of dollars of possessions stolen from us during the attack, our medical bills and money spent on prescriptions as well as taxi cab travel and hotel bills are growing, the damage to the truck is extensive and will be costly, the cost of replacing my passport and changing my plane ticket will be in the hundreds of dollars, and I am missing an extra week of work pay because of the need to meet with the police and then the embassy to replace my passport before I can leave the country.



A list of our tangbile stolen possessions and their approximate value is below.

Jennifer Wolfrom’s stolen possessions:

Canon Rebel Ti1 DLSR camera, wide angle DSLR lens, two lens filters and three 8 or 16 GB photo cards = $2,000
iPhone 5 = $600
Alps Mountaineering Four Season two person backpacking tent = $250
Women’s Patagonia Primaloft Nano Puff jacket = $200
Women’s Outdoor Research rain jacket = $150
Out Door Research snow gators = $120
Big Agnes Dual Core Primaloft sleeping pad = $200
700 Peruvian Soles = $350
Women’s La Sportiva mountaineering boots = $400
Princeton Tech Head Lamp = $40
US Passport = $140
Driver’s license = $25
Camelback Cloud day back pack = $80
Miscellaneous clothing = $200
Debit and Credit cards

Total: $4,755



Joseph Wolfrom and Meghan Doherty’s stolen possessions:

Women’s garmont mountaineering boots = $400
iPod = $300
Sony Vaio Lap Top and software = $4,000
Men’s Patagonia Nano Puff jacket = $200
5 gallon gas can and 5 gallons of gas = $120
Extensive First Aid Kit = $100
Men’s La Sportiva climbing shoes = $120
Garmin GPS = $300
Native polarized sunglasses = $100
Miscellaneous clothing = $300

Total: $5,940



We are unsure what the total costs of the following will be, but they are sure to be extensive:

Food, lodging, and transportation in Cuzco, Peru for an extra week
Airfare to the US Embassy in Lima, Peru for passport replacement
Food and lodging in Lima, Peru for the duration of the passport replacement process
Repairs to extensive damage to the Toyota Tacoma truck and Phoenix Pop-up camper
Medical and Dental bills for injuries acquired during the attack
Possible mental health expenses regarding trauma from the attack
Possible expense of towing the Toyota Tacoma from Ocongate to Cuzco if the policia will not drive the truck to Cuzco as promised



While we are working with the US Consulate and Embassy, as well as the Policia National of Peru, we are currently seeking financial and emotional support from any resources that are available to us. Please let me know what next steps need to be taken to apply for your support services and determine our eligibility. Additionally, if you know of any other resources that could be available to us we would greatly appreciate any advice and guidance.



Thank you,

Jennifer Wolfrom"
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:42pm PT
Riley Whiner, the gutless jabber. Maybe you'll squirm your way into an actual point one of these days, tough guy. Yayayayayaya!!!

And sorry dude - but you're a geek...
I can see why you were so easily attacked in Mexico..
no offense - but best stay home from now on - i think you have the right idea..


Oh, really? I didn't say one thing about what happened. As usual, it is obvious you just make up facts to fit however your mood strikes. Might want to get some mood stabilizers before you post, dooood. It doesn't work here where people aren't paid to pretend you make sense.
Hardman Knott

Gym climber
Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley, Ca
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:42pm PT
I would have zero fears of visiting this village.

Me neither. In a gun truck.

LOL!!

Something like this sounds about right...

Armored SWAT truck is a bullet-proof, blast resistant rolling bunker



Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:45pm PT
Hey Riley, slow your roll.

Jebus comes off as intelligent, articulate, and moderate.

Lighten up a little bud. :)

I'm not being a dick, but sometimes the stress and the long shifts your work requires translates into you posting negative stuff. I've seen it...
John M

climber
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:48pm PT
Sorry Riley.. but I don't buy your interpretation of the facts.
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:48pm PT
Hey Riley, slow your roll.

Jebus comes off as intelligent, articulate, and moderate.

Lighten up a little bud. :)


Ah, he'll flame out and find something else to rant on. Thanks for the reality check anyway ;). Truth is, a little internet heat never hurt anybody, we'll both recover to our charming selves I'm sure.
WBraun

climber
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:49pm PT
Fund is currently over $17,000. Now they have enough to continue on to Argentina and onwards for more adventure while you all go back to work in dark offices. Woot! Good times.


LOL !!!!!!
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:49pm PT
Something stinks here....

I could see maybe asking or needing help getting back home.

$17,000?

WTF?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:53pm PT
After reading that whole thing,, and how they ask for money for "possible future trauma and mental treatments" is HILARIOUS!!!!!.


Some intrepid travelers they are KNOTT !! ROFLMAO!! I think they should just stay down there- if ya cant beat em join em...;-D
Hawkeye

climber
State of Mine
Jan 4, 2013 - 03:53pm PT
And yes - I have travelled more than you can probably imagine.
You can take up a collection for me to fly to Peru anytime - I will be happy to go..

just listen to riley............the biggest most arrogant blowhard that ever posted on the taco.


why the hell dont you guys get this?
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