Joshua tree january

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 41 - 57 of total 57 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
verticalbound

Trad climber
Anchorage
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 9, 2013 - 01:30pm PT
Alright didnt get a straight forward answer, would I be ok with a single set of 7 cams? fingers to fist?
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Jan 9, 2013 - 01:43pm PT
Yeah, you can get by with that rack. But bring some wires, too.

To prove you are a real climber you have to lead Double Cross with hex nuts.

He'll need one quickdraw to clip the Batten Memorial Bolt. :-)

About Double Cross, on my very first trip to Josh as a climber, which was to take a beginner's course from Bob Gaines, the guide, Coz, pointed out to us some recently splattered blood and brains on Double Cross. That was sort of sobering. True story.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Jan 9, 2013 - 02:12pm PT
Alright didnt get a straight forward answer, would I be ok with a single set of 7 cams? fingers to fist?

As stated above, bring thinner gear as well as it is essential for adequately protecting a considerable number of routes at Josh. That said, you will find that 0.25" to perhaps 2.0" is the most common sizes you will use. Several shoulder length slings will also prove very useful. Depending on the route, doubles of some sizes might help.

Also, if you end up top-roping some routes (which is not uncommon), an extendo of some sort is invaluable (not to be confused with a cordelette). A 20-30 foot section of an old climbing rope is ideal.

and whats the best guide book or two to pick up?

I'm biased, but unless you plan on climbing harder than 5.11 or wandering far afield or you already know the area well (meaning you don't need good approach and descent info), you will significantly better off with this than any other guide.

Jim Thornburg photo. Nicky Dyal on Taxman
Jim Thornburg photo. Nicky Dyal on Taxman
Credit: looking sketchy there...

You can either buy it, or I believe even rent a guide from Joshua Tree Outfitters http://www.joshuatreeoutfitters.com/
The user formerly known as stzzo

climber
Sneaking up behind you
Jan 9, 2013 - 04:41pm PT



verticalbound

Trad climber
Anchorage

Topic Author's Reply - Jan 9, 2013 - 01:30pm PT
Alright didnt get a straight forward answer, would I be ok with a single set of 7 cams? fingers to fist?

If you climb a 100' route, I calculate that means 7 pieces on avg of about 15' apart. Unless you decide you don't need one at the top lip of the route.

This, of course, means you have no pro for an anchor at the top and that you have to rely on finding placements for whatever's left on your rack as you go.

If your route doesnt fit that gear, you'll have fewer pieces to choose from.

There are a lot of routes less than 100', but you're already reducing your placement options by having a limited range and no doubles.

Are you comfy with that, and do you think it will let you climb a wide variety of routes?

Like I said, guides recommend anywhere from a few pieces + draws to doubles in some sizes.

For a wide variety of routes, you're better off racking toward the fuller end of this range of recommendations.
verticalbound

Trad climber
Anchorage
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 9, 2013 - 07:09pm PT
I was contemplating selling a set of cams which is why i said 7 cams, but I actually have doubles from .5-3 BD, and my smallest cam is a red alien, and a fair amount of nuts/hexes tiny to fists. pretty good coverage?
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jan 9, 2013 - 07:18pm PT
Yep.

Not sure what size a red alien is but if it's down in the purple TCU size and you have singles up to the .5 Camalot, doubles on the .5 and .75 and singles the rest of the way up, plus a set of nuts, yer covered for most of it.

Doubles on the 2, and 3 do come in handy though.

Plan on a couple of rest days when you've fried your tips.


verticalbound

Trad climber
Anchorage
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 9, 2013 - 08:16pm PT
my tips seem to regenerate fast, and im an avid proponent for super glue!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jan 9, 2013 - 08:21pm PT
Super glue won't help.

The problem isn't flappers.


More like an accidental encounter with a belt sander.
verticalbound

Trad climber
Anchorage
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 9, 2013 - 09:13pm PT
lol, you've never coated your tips in glue? gorilla glue works great too! the faster it dries the better!
The user formerly known as stzzo

climber
Sneaking up behind you
Jan 9, 2013 - 09:27pm PT
The problem isn't flappers.


More like an accidental encounter with a belt sander.

Haha! I've been saying for years JT rock is like sandpaper.

I always come away bleeding... There's a reason why that JT Salve sells well...
happiegrrrl

Trad climber
www.climbaddictdesigns.com
Jan 9, 2013 - 11:26pm PT
It is good advice to take it easy on your tips the first few days. Or you will, almost assuredly, be sorry.

Which would you rather have: Two days of hard-cranking only to find you've got no skin on your fingertips and couldn't climb if you wanted to - for the next 5 days or more. Or a couple days spent getting on a few things and also scoping the areas while you build up your tips.Then a good day of climbing hard, and then ease off if need be, or continue cranking if in fact your tips are tougher than everyone who has been to Joshua Tree imagines possible?

No glue prosthetics are going to protect your fingertips from the ravaging they are about to receive. But yes - the salves do help. Best to come prepared. Any beeswax based hand salve works - Burt's Bees, Bag Balm, Joshua Tree Climbing Salve, Sierra Salve, etc. Wash hands after dinner, and slather it on. Reapply a lighter coat in the morning.
verticalbound

Trad climber
Anchorage
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 9, 2013 - 11:55pm PT
how bout most comprehensive guide? i am interested in building a huge base, Im a pretty good hiker/walker can cover a good 30 miles in an afternoon and still have the legs to climb, i want to do as many routes as possible in a month and a half, minimum period of time.
rlf

Trad climber
Josh, CA
Jan 10, 2013 - 11:07am PT
It seems to me that you have gotten a ton of useful information here. You want more?
mwatsonphoto

Trad climber
los angeles, ca
Jan 10, 2013 - 11:12am PT
30 miles in an afternoon? (in a car, right?)
drewsky

climber
Seattle
Jan 10, 2013 - 11:42am PT
As stated above, if this is your first trip here and you're not looking to climb in the 5.11 range, it probably doesn't matter too much which book you pick up. Maybe one of the 'select' books would work, but look through them and make sure they seem like they have what you want.

The new Miramontes guide is nice in that it covers the entire park and has good approach info, but it is somewhat of a 'select' guide in that it 'only' covers 2500 or so of the park's 80,000,000 routes. That said, it certainly functions well as a 'best of' book. It does omit some pretty good routes, but most of them are hard and somewhat remote.

I've always liked the old Bartlett guides (small books; each covers a specific area) but they too miss out on parts of the park (Geology Tour Road, for instance).

I don't have as much experience with the newer Vogel guides; the Joshua Tree West one looks to be 'comprehensive' although as the name suggests, a further edition will be required to cover other areas of the park.

The old Vogel Falcon guide could also possibly serve you well.

I would strongly recommend keeping a double set of cams. If for no other reason, often times anchor building requires them. I can't count the times I've found a #4 Camalot size to be crucial for anchor setups even if no piece anywhere near that size was required while actually climbing. That said, with an extender of some type (webbing, rope, etc.) there are often myriad options. I usually roll with a basic doubles w/#4 camalot (old, in this case), extra finger size pieces and a robust stopper rack including some offsets. It really depends on the climb, but often the small widgets come in handy.

The best advice I can give is: clear your mind and get ready for one of the coolest places on Earth (that I've seen so far)! Don't be dismayed at the crowds in Hidden Valley: if it's full, walk around (as opposed to driving repeatedly around the loop), talk to people about a parking spot and be patient. You'll likely find a site to stay in even if they're all full and Hidden Valley really is closest to all the most classic climbing (you can walk to almost anything, really, if you're willing to put in a few miles). Have fun!

Edit: A red alien is approximately the same size as an orange TCU. You definitely want smaller! Green and yellow aliens (blue and yellow TCU) are crucial, as is at least one smaller (purple TCU/blue Alien). I have doubles or triples in those sizes and generally use them at JTree.
The user formerly known as stzzo

climber
Sneaking up behind you
Jan 10, 2013 - 09:28pm PT
For my money, the most comprehensive guide(s) are the two Falcon guides: Joshua Tree, and Joshua Tree West (I haven't heard of Joshua Tree East yet, but I'm not an "authority").

But, that's a whole lotta book to be carting around, and I really like the Miramontes guide. It was my goto book for the last trip.

For all the time I've spent stumbling around with the Falcon guides trying to find routes, I'll take the Miramontes book any day of the week. With formation stacked against formation, color photos and GPS coordinates are your friend.
tinker b

climber
the commonwealth
Jan 11, 2013 - 04:54am PT
with any of the books look at the maps before you get in your car. most of the climbing can be walked to from hiddenvalley, but the guide book authors assume you are driving. everything is so short that things look far away, but they are close. for example ryan mountain is a little more than a mile away walking. have fun i am so jealous sitting in massachusettes.
Messages 41 - 57 of total 57 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews