Need suggestions for indoor climbing wall

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Messages 1 - 19 of total 19 in this topic
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Topic Author's Original Post - Dec 9, 2012 - 12:15pm PT
Hi!
I recently moved into a house with an unfinished 8' basement. So naturally, I'm using a part of it to hang plywood and can't decide what would work best.


I'm using one end of a rectangle room, 18' wide at the end that I will be turning into a cave. The cave comes out 15' on the left side, 24' on the right. There is a post and beam 7' from the left wall (parallel).




I would like a lot of vertical wall to traverse on, and I could build an overhanging boulder in the center of the room - or just lean some of the walls back...




any ideas?



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khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Dec 9, 2012 - 12:28pm PT
Overhanging keeps it interesting. If you just have vertical it gets old. When I re-do our wall up here (need a barn first) I don't think I'll do any straight vertical, but various degrees of overhang. Even just 5 deg for part of it. Currently we have about 12x12 ft straight vertical and two 4x8 sections at 15 & 20 (if I recall correctly). My thinking was that I would enjoy the traverses, but all the traverses we do seem to involve the overhung sections... much more interesting.

But that's just me...

Reeotch

Trad climber
4 Corners Area
Dec 9, 2012 - 01:10pm PT
What khanomon said,

Vertical is stupid on a woody. On mine we had one 12 x 12 wall that was just 5 degrees overhanging. I was sooo glad we decided to do it that way.

Also, the fewer right angles the better. Again, too easy . . .
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Dec 9, 2012 - 01:40pm PT
This is what I did last month:

Credit: mechrist

It is about 32 degrees overhanging and I would NOT go less than that, especially if you only have 8' vertical to work with (mine is 9'). You will run out of moves before you know it. Note my lady is is a midget... with a flat head, no teeth, and big ears!

Some things I like about it:

1) Perfectly symmetrical. Due to limited space, making up 20-30 fun problems is a challenge. With perfect symmetry you make up 1/2 the number of problems... when you do a problem, you simply repeat the exact same problem on the other side. It keeps you from favoring your strong side too.

2) The center panel has T-nuts drilled in a radial pattern from a central starting jug. This allows you to work moves that are incrementally bigger, without changing the body swing, etc. The side panels are a simple grid with some campus rungs.

3) The 2x4 supports double as sloper ledges. I turned some of them at a slight angle to make them even worse slopers but better knee bars and under clings.

3a) The 2x6 vertical supports work as heinous compression features. I can't hold them without texture, so I intend to glue some rough ass granite sand on there... no point in having strong muscles and pussy skin.

The gf wanted a vertical wall. I built a half-assed one (8x8) and had her play around on it for a bit. Even she agreed vertical is a waste of space.
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2012 - 05:48pm PT
Thanks for the ideas... I should basically reproduce gunsmoke traverse with a roof then.
Vulcan

Sport climber
Dec 9, 2012 - 07:12pm PT
yes...forget the vertical wall.
adjustable walls work well.
easy to do with turn buckles.
Rolfr

Social climber
North Vancouver BC
Dec 9, 2012 - 10:37pm PT
Forget the wooden holds, plastic simulates real rock far better. At most gyms i've climbed at, the most popular walls are about 14 degrees past vert or less, typically the same as a fair amount of sport areas.

I have a small cave area in my wall, but the other walls see more use. For system training I use HIT strips under a stairway in conjunction with boulder circuits.

Iíve found that that having lots of thick mattresses under the whole area really increases the intensity of the workouts, dam iím too old to break bones, but still young enough to want to crank as hard as possible. Set some money aside for serious padding.

Do not skimp on T nuts , a minimum of one ever 6", you will not regret it, well worth the time and effort. I have up to 200 per 4x8 sheet of ply and lay out the framing on the back of the ply to avoid placing t nuts against studs.

I you are as obsessive as me, us a good two stage epoxy coloured paint( to match your local crag) and add silica sand between coats for a realistic rock finish.

tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2012 - 11:30pm PT
what does paint do besides smearing and keeping holds from spinning?
Rolfr

Social climber
North Vancouver BC
Dec 10, 2012 - 12:39am PT
Read " add silica sand to epoxy paint". Like smearing on JT granite.
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Dec 10, 2012 - 04:14am PT
Credit: RyanD
Dr.Sprock

Boulder climber
I'm James Brown, Bi-atch!
Dec 10, 2012 - 04:16am PT
use Cedar, it resists staff infections,



mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Dec 27, 2012 - 04:38pm PT
haha... perlonhex... you suck at climbing and life... I would be as pathetic as you if I had to climb in Jtree too, so I don't hold it against you.
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 31, 2012 - 01:00am PT
Credit: tooth


So I've taken a lot of advice and have 25 sheets up so far. Only 12' of a traverse if dead vertical, the rest starts lying back like what you can see on the left and gets steeper, and then I've got about 5 sheets on the ceiling. A few features like the prow here.

I found some decking paint that I'm trying too. It seems to be working great for putting texture on the wall and fills in 1/4" cracks between the plywood and the walls, etc. I'm putting it on with a trowel and it seems to be exactly like stuff I've seen in gyms. First time I've done a home wall with paint.


So nice to have time off work to mess around for a week!


Burchey, I love crack climbing. Last two pitches of Outer Space in Leavenworth, anything at Tahquitz, Yos. I've found a great set of holds from Atomik for cracks - but haven't set anything up yet.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Dec 31, 2012 - 02:53am PT
So I take it the decking paint is thick enough to alleviate splinter issues from the cheap plywood?
Chinchen

climber
Way out there....
Dec 31, 2012 - 03:21am PT
I would suggest using Sketchup to design your wall.....easy and lots o fun. It would be a good way to model your space and see what will actually fit.


http://www.sketchup.com/intl/en/product/gsu.html

Google Sketchup used to do quick designs of climbing gym. <br/>
Google Sketchup used to do quick designs of climbing gym.

Credit: Chinchen
tooth

Trad climber
B.C.
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 31, 2012 - 04:41am PT
I'm more familiar with AutoCad and Chief Architect.

And yes, the OSB looking-stuff is a laminate beam - the plywood is the same stuff I've used for climbing walls 4 times now - never had a splinter go into a shoe.
Valerio

climber
Dec 31, 2012 - 07:08am PT
try Moon Board.
I've climbed many times on it... hard but very nice.

Val
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Dec 31, 2012 - 07:29am PT
+1 for Sketchup.
westhegimp

Social climber
granada hills
Jan 1, 2013 - 01:01am PT
Adjustable crack.
Adjustable crack.
Credit: westhegimp

"Santa's Chimney" Fully adjustable crack.



Big Bertha
Big Bertha
Credit: westhegimp

Mark on "Big Bertha." Adjustable offwidth roof crack.


Just made these in December 2012. Still need to figure out how to use them. :)

Wes
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