Runout classics - ever take the ride?

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GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2012 - 11:13am PT
GEEEEEZUS!
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Nov 25, 2012 - 11:52am PT
...ever take the ride? I failed to on my most recent attempt:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1617265&msg=1873491#msg1873491
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
i WASNT ON THE INTERNET during bush years...
Nov 25, 2012 - 11:59am PT
110 footer to the ground- first ever visit to rock and raps..


Two thirty plus footers on "set the control for the heart of the sun"

a forty footer on "nose bleed"

Dropped thirty five feet TWICE on sport routes where i "faded" at the anchors- stopped both times just before da ground..Now of course Dano was belaying on one of those so i thought it was just his normal belay flights..;-)

A few twenty to thirty footers on Al Swansons routes up on Mid dome and surrounds..When he says 11+ BET its 11++...

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Nov 25, 2012 - 12:06pm PT
I took a runout 35 foot fall about 5 years ago.

The funny thing is, I was only 4 feet above my last piece of pro
and it didn't pull out.
philo

Trad climber
Somewhere halfway over the rainbow
Nov 25, 2012 - 12:14pm PT
Geebees Ron and you say your a Conservative. Sounds like you log pretty Liberal flight plans.
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Nov 25, 2012 - 12:16pm PT
Big rides? Ive had a couple, one on a slab, one not.

The first was on the Wave third pitch of Greasy but Groovy on the Royal Arches Apron. I had just gotten the first bolt in at the only possible foothold that allowed a stance from the belay. I was quite pleased to have gotten that bolt in, and the next part looked more featured. I took off on small edges, some good, and some that creaked a little. I got a ways above the bolt, maybe 15 or 20 feet, pulled off a handhold, and slid a true 30 feet. I was physically unhurt, but my go for it went and I put an intermediate bolt in rather than try it again.

On a trip to Europe in 1977, Al Harris was our host in North Wales and Rob, Gib and I had some of the times of our lives. Rob and I did an early free ascent of Great Wall on Cloggy, which had recently been freed. We also went to Dinas Chromlech and the famous Cenotaph Corner. After Rob led the Corner, I thought Id give Right Wall a go. Right Wall is dead vertical for about 150 feet. It was a Pete Livsey creation first climbed after a rappel inspection.

There was the enticing prize of the second ascent and first onsight to be had, so with Rob belaying, I started up. I had no idea where it went and its not obvious. Some of the holds are pockets and holes that are hard to see until you get within 10 feet of them. I fiddled with nuts and craned my neck to find the line, until my strength was failing. But the stoppers and hexes in cracks and holes were solid, so rather than lower off, I figured Id just try for some big holds a ways up. Melted off and took flight, say 25-30. The nuts held and I didnt hit anything, but landed only a short ways above Rob, what with the rope stretch in the 9 mil double ropes. A little swing in the catch caused me to flip upside down in my Whillans harness and this turn of events caused us both to laugh uncontrollably as he lowered me down.

Here a video taken looking down in the same vicinity, only on a much harder route (E8) between the Corner and Right Wall. My fall was nothing compared to the one in the video, but it gives an idea of the situation. There is a really big ride at the end of the clip.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiLlxs0zP3E
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Nov 25, 2012 - 12:19pm PT
I knew this would be a good thread. Always wondered what pitching off the end of the plank on Sidewinder would do.

There's at least one account of taking the big fall on Sidewinder at mountain project:

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/sidewinder/105722086

Not trying to be hard man (I'm not), but I don't think that traverse is anywhere near 5.9. I thought it was 5.7, it just feels like 5.9 when you're looking waaaaay back there at that bolt. If it were really 5.9, there would be many accounts of people taking that whipper.

110 footer to the ground- first ever visit to rock and raps..

Uh, how'd ya survive that, Ron?
philo

Trad climber
Somewhere halfway over the rainbow
Nov 25, 2012 - 12:43pm PT

My first trip to ERock was in 1986. I had just taken a two year teaching position at the Outdoor Education Center in Trinity Texas. My first weekend in the Lone Star StateI had been invited by Tom Lyde to experience Central Texas' best climbing area. By the time I got to Texas I was already a broke down has been of a once was but had enough huevos left to climb without embarrassing myself too badly. Right off the bat Tom suggest that Texas Radio is a classic and sics it on me. The lead went smoothly and as I was topping out I was hailed by the assembled Stupids and invited to join them for a guide's safety meeting at the anchors. They had no idea who I was but were immediately accepting and ingratiating to the dude from Colorado. From that trip on and for two years after I stayed at the Stupid house every weekend on the way to and from ERock. When my second Texas weekend was approaching I was planning on returning to ERock but I had no set partner. So the night before I taught one of my co-workers how to belay.
Having pulled off Texas Radio the week before I was fairly full of piss and vinegar and thought the French Route would be a good warm up. It was like a grade easier than Texas Radio so what could go wrong. In the parking lot that morning I was introduced to the quite talented and very gregarious James Crump. He said something about the Back Side being real slippery in the humid conditions at that time but I foolishly did not listen. At the base of the route I go over Belaying 101 with my partner one last time and launched off. Well I was climbing great and feeling self confident when I opted to forgo the little wired stopper in the overlap before the first bolt. Then, right as I was reaching for a quick draw, the most incomprehensible thing happened - both feet slipped and I fell. Incomprehensible to me at least as I just did not fall. In dozens of years of serious ascending I just never let myself log much airtime. In fact the fall from the French Route was likely only my 8th or 9th serious fall. So no one was surprised more than me when I so suddenly became a stunt dummy performing a gravity check. Well maybe my belayer. He was certainly surprised and sat helplessly watching me plummet, bounce and tumble a very long way before finally slithering to a disheveled stop way down below his stance.
The sound of a human body during a tumbling ground fall is disturbing to say the least. I can only imagine the thoughts running through the heads of James, the Stupids and their students as I plummeted like a haul bag just to the left of their class. One by one, with the guides leading the way, they scrambled over to see what was sure to be a mangled dead guy. Shaken not stirred, mangled not dead, I sat up and asked if anyone had seen my glasses. It was blurry but I do recall a few people crossing them selves having just witnessed a miracle and a few others making the cross with their fingers to ward off evil. I have a hard enough time believing it myself and believe me I was there. It went like this. When I slipped I immediately turned outward and hit my left hip harshly on a ledge 10 or 12 feet down. That impact eventually became a deep black and green horrid looking bruise from knee to armpit and wrapping half way around my body. But it was important to me to protect my surgically rebuilt right knee at all costs. So far so good but landing on my feet in the boulders below seemed impractical. So a few feet lower I thought I would tap off the wall with my feet and perform a tuck and roll onto my back into the one flat spot I could see below. Well anyway that was my plan. This was one of those times when time seemed to roll like a slo-mo replay and I had plenty of time to plan my next move. Somewhere along the line I just gave my self over to providence and accepted what ever outcome be fell me. Going limp like that kept me from completing my tuck but is probably what saved my live that day. It was either that or that weird space alien gravity that giant whacky batholith has. So as I was saying there I was, a Zen potato sack, half way through a tuck and with the ground the limit. I did at least manage to propel myself towards the door mat flat spot I had spied between the boulders but my futile half tuck had me making first contest with my face. And I mean I face planted hard. An improvement some would surely say but amazingly I broke nothing, not my face, my teeth nor even my glasses. In fact I bounced. I quite literally bounced five or six feet up landed on my back and poured like partially frozen pudding downhill for another 20 feet or so. I remember not wanting to fight it till I came to a complete stop come what may. And what came was the James Gang running to get there. Tyhe were all brought to a silenced stop when I unexpectedly sat up.Those guys were great, really really great. They were right there to help me when I so easily might have desperately needed it. When I stood up and started slowly moving it became clear I was hurt but that Flight4Life was unneeded and even Warren would not need to be disturbed. With my arms around their shoulders those big guys kept me from further injury helping me back to the campground and into semi legal delusions of painlessness. That was an interesting night at the campground and mind you this was just my 2nd time there. Surviving that fall made me a bit of a celebrity to the class of Yahoos until I passed out with a little help from my friends. In the morning I got up very, very slowly and took stock. I was beat down bad bad bad. Scathed but completely unbroken. I managed to stretch myself out by walking around to the back side again and checking out the hotties I mean students. No one seemed disturbed by thoughts of my fall the day before or my presence at that time. But then I might have gone just a wee bit too far. Having spent some good formative years with horses in my life I always viewed the "get back on the horse" adage as a sacred command. So I did. That wasn't the bad part. Most folks kind of thought it was good to see me facing my fears or what ever. What brought them to a second silence and had them crossing again was that in my process of getting back in the saddle I decided to solo ripple. Right in front of the same class I had cratered by the day before. Some surely thought I was insane or brain damaged most just sat there watching and waiting for the train wreck that never happened. By that time it was clear that for various reasons (which at the time I was not fully aware of) I was given the dubious distinction of being an Honorary Stupid Brother.
ontheedgeandscaredtodeath

Trad climber
SLO, Ca
Nov 25, 2012 - 02:19pm PT
I took the whipper off the Figures on a Landscape traverse. Minor leagues compared to some of the falls described on this thread, but thrilling nonetheless.
GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2012 - 02:22pm PT
I took a runout 35 foot fall about 5 years ago.

The funny thing is, I was only 4 feet above my last piece of pro
and it didn't pull out.


They call this the Locker belay.
GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2012 - 02:25pm PT
per Sidewinder - I looked at my climbing journal and the day I first led it I put down 5.8 as well, seemed much harder in the wind... sometimes things feel easier the first time because your psyched, and wayyy harder the second because you thought it was casual. Haha short sighted climbing, much like Onsigh climbing....

I'd say the scariest fall I've taken was actually seconding, on the second pitch moves right off the belay on The Vampire. Blew the first few crimps and went for a biiiiig swing down and around the corner, probably 12-15 feet down and another 10 sideways. Fun fun fun...
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Nov 25, 2012 - 02:36pm PT
I saw this guy take a chilling whipper on the last pitch of the Royal Arches

While it looks like the obvious way to go, the long, low unprotected traverse he took is off route. The real route stays very high, taking you thru some class 4 blocks followed by a short, well protected 5.4 traverse across the slippery water course and to the forest.

--


One time I was coiling up the rope in the forest as this guy's girlfriend leads across the low route. She freezes in the middle of the greasy water course, totally sketched out. The impatient, cocky boyfriend, comes walking out coiling the rope, no belay or pro, to see what's up. There was nothing to stop them from taking the final big ride to the Ahwahnee, if she slipped. She made it, however.
Rudder

Trad climber
Costa Mesa, CA
Nov 25, 2012 - 03:03pm PT
I smacked my chin so hard on the sloping top that it split wide open and was spewing blood all over the rock,

Yikes, Andy! I wanna check out that scar next time I see you. lol :) That is a cool top out on that climb... and quite a ways out. ;) When I went back up and turned it the girl was gone. Totally anticlimactic for me.
wstmrnclmr

Trad climber
Bolinas, CA
Nov 25, 2012 - 03:09pm PT
Hey Base...I bet the strong head you gained from the slabs kept you well in tight situations in other endeavors. No other form of climbing can give you that mind edge. EBGB's is relatively safe compared to some others. Take some of the pad people over to Cyclops and have them jump from the boulder (unless your tall) onto the first move of Surface Tension. You can't clip the first bolt like EBGB's. Or jump on When sheep ran scared...Ran scared all the way up that thing. I did take a 50' of a route while putting up an FA in Tahoe...Was wearing a sport harness. Was using a Bulldog on lead from stances (I'd read an article about Johnny Woodward putting up routes like this in an old Rock&Ice in Joshua Tree. He called it "neo-trad") when a foot and hand hold blew. My belayer was belaying the drill through a pulley on the back loop with one device and me with a gri-gri. When I hit the end, most of the gear loops blew including the thick one with the drill. Almost killed him as the drill buried itself next to him. I have pictures of the FA and will post when I find them. Neat climb.
Edit: Rick A..went up the first three of GBG last month. How on earth did you put those bolts in on lead? Amazing!
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Reno, Nuh VAAAA duh
Nov 25, 2012 - 03:57pm PT
per Sidewinder - I looked at my climbing journal and the day I first led it I put down 5.8 as well, seemed much harder in the wind... sometimes things feel easier the first time because your psyched, and wayyy harder the second because you thought it was casual. Haha short sighted climbing, much like Onsigh climbing....

You're right about psyche and the bite of a climb scorned. I still think legit 5.9 in that section would yield a lot more whipper tales, but I've only climbed it once.

A lot of good whipper stories here!
ec

climber
ca
Nov 25, 2012 - 05:18pm PT
The last one I can remember was on a new route we were on at the obscure Bat Rock in the Kern (late 90's). I was at a point you get to during these endeavors where you have to just go for the next stance or go home; albeit a long way out from the last bolt. I came close, but lost traction while stretching for a hold and went at least 40-50 in a long downward, then sweeping arc and missed the deck by a foot with by shoulder and head; looking right into by belayer's astonished expression on his face. I went right back up to the last bolt, only to start feeling my scraped ankles and bruised knee. So, my partner Ron volunteered to finish it off, which he did in good style (he's taller, too). At the base of the route, there is a peculiar, natural intrusion that looks like the Roman Numeral, IX (or 'nine') which we named the route, not just for the inscription, but in jest as if Olympic judges had held up their cards to rate my fall. It definitely was a 'Nine.'

 ec
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 25, 2012 - 05:26pm PT
Per Sidewinder - I was probably wearing EBs on the FA, and we rated the traverse 5.9. It's gotta be one of the harder routes to rate due to the lack of handholds, combined with abundant pucker factor. My partner, Eric Schoen was adamantly insisting the traverse was harder for him as he squeaked across it on TR, because his barrel chest pushed him out away from the wall more than mine. I was perched directly above him thoroughly enjoying his plight!

My biggest whipper was off The Slab at Tahquitz - I overlooked the exit right onto the slab, and placed a slung clog endwise in the splitter hand crack. Instead of climbing that crack to easier ground, I continued laybacking up the leaning OW and almost made the top before slipping on some mossy rock.

Solid 50 footer on a goldline rope with a bowline on a coil around my waist. If that clog had pulled, I probably would've decked, or come close to it. That was the first time I ever placed a nut...
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
i WASNT ON THE INTERNET during bush years...
Nov 25, 2012 - 05:37pm PT
Rick Sumner on "deadmans rapell" -Dinosaur rock aug -012  <br/>
 <br/>
steep f...
Rick Sumner on "deadmans rapell" -Dinosaur rock aug -012

steep featured face climibing with bolt and natural pro 5.7 these days. BUT the first two moves are 9-ish if you ask me.
Credit: Ron Anderson

climb2ski, the above is a photo of the route i fell down first time out. Rick Sumner is seen here leading the climb "deadmans rapell"- which wasnt even a route yet at the time i flew it. You cant see the top of the right pillar but i flew from there to where the pic is being taken from lol! DEADMANS clip with a single biner rap- where you accidentally put the wraps on upside down vs the anchor and weighting, and it flips the carabiner once fully weighted - releasing the rope and you go AAAAAAAAAGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHTHUMP THUMP THUD. I came to,, and saw my three buddies faces all looking down at me- just like a hollywood movie lol!

I had hit the ledge on the left after about sixty five feet then continued down to the bottom. First thing i said was,, gotta get more and better stuff to do this shyt! Cracked ribs and a chunk outta my ass and assorted rasberries to the meat were the result. I walked funny on the way out that day- snow made us park the ol impala 1/4 mile downhill from dino..

And Philo, those are the memorable ones. I dont even count sport whiffers. Or AID fallz..



GNARLY stuff everyone!
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Nov 25, 2012 - 05:43pm PT
So many stories here that make me cringe. Climb long enough, and you will likely have some air time. By God's grace, we live for another adventure.

It is rather sobering, however, when the outcome is different. On January 29th, 1996, I watched my friend Pete Schoerner take an 120 foot fall while attempting a first ascent of an ice route here in June Lake. He was on the 4th pitch, when the ice sheered off the wall.

Pete was killed instantly, and it was a horror show I will, unfortunately, never forget. Flanders and I recovered his body the next day.

This event really sobered me to the seriousness of what we do. When death knocks so close to home, it changes you.....sure as hell made me way more mindful of what I will and won't do.

And when I look back at the many near misses in my 38 years on a rope....I count my blessings.

Rest in peace, Pete.....you were badass....

photo not found
Missing photo ID#215684
ec

climber
ca
Nov 25, 2012 - 05:50pm PT
Cragman, you got that right...

Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment.

 ec
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