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T H

Boulder climber
extraordinaire
Mar 7, 2014 - 01:04am PT
Owens Lake webcam today (not manipped).
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 01:56am PT
Weathermen, see?
Ground hogs at heart.

There are many kinds of rain events. This is, I feel, a nice, interesting term.

For the brain-dead zombies watching the weather.

Why so mysterious, you vane guys and girls with blue screen savvy but no real idea of what's happening without the national services.

Local weather speaks for itself; you just have to wait for it to show its hand.

I liked it better when it was a shooting match, a gamble, adventurous.

One needed preparedness, as in Boy-Scoutery, Girl-Scouting, and Campfiring.

By the same token, GPS means you don't need that compass, right?

And let's not get into pencils and paper vs. smart phones.

Cans vs. Mtn. House. Frames vs. body packs. Down vs. kapok.

Ah, the good old days. No helmets, no helmet-cams, just a pocket Rollei if you were lucky enough to find it in the jumble of gear in the rear of the van.

And a swami belt and hammer and the weight of iron.

And balls of old string you saved, for the rainy days or to recycle.
Credit: mouse from merced



mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 02:28am PT
MFM's Flames Bulletin Board.

To those who might wish to purchase any of Steve Cassady's books, including Bouncing Outside & Bridging the Gap, here is the link to find them in various places in various media.

http://www.literacy-ink.com/booksite.php

They are worth the price.


Ron Anderson--the deadmouse is still in the house. He may be arriving next week and I'll keep you posted. Thx again, Fire Marshall Rong!

A little Flames appreciation for your firefighting efforts.

moosedrool

climber
lost, far away from Poland
Mar 7, 2014 - 02:41am PT
What's up Mouse? Want to go to City of rocks? I'll give you a ride.

Moose
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 02:58am PT
A State of Change: Forgotten Landscapes of California.
Laura Cunningham. Heyday Books, 2010.
I saw Laura at the reception.
I saw Laura at the reception.
Credit: mouse from merced
A bottle of Glacier Water in her hand.
A bottle of Glacier Water in her hand.
Credit: mouse from merced
She was practiced in the art of depiction.
She was practiced in the art of depiction.
Credit: mouse from merced
I could tell by her paint-stained hands. <br/>
Laura Cunningham, left, Sar...
I could tell by her paint-stained hands.
Laura Cunningham, left, Sarah Lim, Museum Director, right.
Credit: mouse from merced
The foothills above the San Fernando Valley 500 years ago and 500 year...
The foothills above the San Fernando Valley 500 years ago and 500 years later. Postcard announcing the reception & exhibit.
Credit: mouse from merced
The Grizzly is on the cover of the text.

Frontispiece of text.
Frontispiece of text.
Credit: Laura Cunningham
This is one text that the UC Merced used in one of their classes recently.

I attended the reception and listened to the talk while taking pix for Sarah's use in the Historical Society Newsletter. Of course I purchased the book, a $50.00 investment in ART and SCIENTIFIC OBSERVATION. (I used my Society discount, natch.)

Heyday Books has been one of my favorite publishers since I read Malcolm Margolin's great book, The Ohlone Way, describing everyday Bay Area life among the coastal tribes, some twenty or thirty years back when I came home to roost here in Merced.

She went to them first and they ate this project up, because it's just soooo goooood! Twenty years of effort.

Another exhibit to drool over. Hope to see you if you decide to stop in for a look-see.





mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 07:19am PT
MooseDroll,
The Twin Sisters in City of Rocks National Reserve are made up of different rocks. The darker sister is made of granite that is 2.5 billion years old and is some of the oldest rock in the Lower 48 states. The lighter sister (some faux-ty faux thousand tons lighter!) is made of granite from a younger formation that is 25 million years old.

Somehow, I don't make these two as sisters, man. But remember, there are (reputedly) eighty-faux thousand mo' stories in the older one's stored memory than in the younger one's. In the Naked City of Rocks, a faux-star resort near the Reserve, you can climb 5.12 all day long, if you wish, or just sit in the bar watchin'. If you can put me up there, fine. Otherwise, I'm makin' plans with Gene for Toll House. thx.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 07:33am PT
Inghams need to stick together. Laura gets that. I told her so and she automatically agreed.
The El Cerrito Plaza.  Sweet.
The El Cerrito Plaza. Sweet.
Credit: Laura Cunningham
Coincidentally, I worked (fall & winter of '68) in the shadow of Albany Hill on San Pablo Avenue, Hwy 123, across from the El Cerrito Plaza, schleppin' burgers, fries, and chicken a la Kentucky. El cerrito = 'little hill,' amigos.

This was at The Red Barn. Just up from Galen's shop.

Just a half a mile from Cosmo's Factory on Fifth Street.

I was living some of the time with the Rev and his new bride, the missus, and then with J. Wood, bluesman.

Cooked more chicken any man ever seen.

Marco M. & Tony D./Backdoor Man
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5FbJ59_Xgs
Risque or Bisque, it still tastes like the henhouse in my memory--bittersweet.

From Ch. One, Golden Bear (Back in Time)
"To gain some sort of insight into how Old California "felt," I camped for several weeks in Yellowstone....
I was lucky enough to watch many [grizzly] bears for days on end, albeit as dots from the roadside [spotting scope]...
Back in California, where only the ghosts of grizzlies roam, I visited the shopping mall near my childhood home in the East Bay [El Cerrito Plaza]. Decades had passed since I visited the place...new cafe franchised, dress-for-less stores, and pet supply centers, all built in a style that might be called desert Tuscan. I stood on ground I had walked on as a child, the parking lot where I had learned to drive, and yet only the view of Albandy Hill and the bayshore remained somewhat similar to my memories....
At the nursery where my sister Margot works, I talked with a volunteer who was busy potting seedlings.
"All the shopping plazas look alike now," I commented.
Gordon responded, "Yeah, and I remember playing in El Cerrito Plaza when it was all fields."
this was the mall I had just revisited. I was caught by surprise as I found a living link to the history of a place I had only known as blacktop.
He told us stories of how, as a boy in the 1940s, he had collected frogs and stickleback fish in the creek that ran through the fields...
"They started to build the old mall in the 1950s--built the parking lot right up to the old creek...."
I went back and 'field walked' the area as an archaeologist would, looking for artifacts. Sure enough, there were relicts. An old, spreading live oak grew out of the courtyard of a dentist's office; the creek still ran there, out of a pipe now, with houses on the other bank and English ivy lining my side. A few willows held onto their dirt-bank existence. I evern found sticllebacks in a pool farther west, near the bayshore, freeways arching overhead."

The place which we came to in 1953 in North Sacramento, near Arden and El Camino, was in this exact same mode in that time. The old scene of huge clumps of oaks and an unlimited vista of the Sierra Nevada had been replaced by the shopping mall there, home to Lucky Market, Rhodes department store, Walgreen's drugs, and the vast parking lot, where they held sports car rallies on weekends, roping off the course and it was free for the watching, just guys using their free time and the free asphalt.

East of us, and south of the American River lay hundreds of acres of dredged cobbles, laid in rows by gold mining concerns earlier in the century.

We -inghams got to stick together. I found a guy living here in the Tioga, several years back, who claimed to have grown up out that direction, in Arden Park, and Del Paso Manor, and he told me that it's all ghetto, with no further elaboration. I don't wanna go back, Jack.

Merced's all I need. It's been more like Fresno every day for the last forty years, anyway.

"You take Clovis, I'll take San Berdoo, ain't no difference between the two.
No sweet refrain, run all round my brain."--Day Van Romp

http://www.browercenter.org/exhibition/cunningham/info
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 10:32am PT
Good Morning Taconites!!!!
Good Morning Taconites!!!!
Credit: GI
Bully!!!!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taconite
What did this look like five hundred years back in time?  For one thin...
What did this look like five hundred years back in time? For one thing, I would not have been able to take this from six storeys up in a building in the middle of the Bear Creek flood plain.
Credit: mouse from merced
Today.
Julia Parker and Deborah Valoma at the Heyday Books launch party for t...
Julia Parker and Deborah Valoma at the Heyday Books launch party for their collaborative effort, "Scrape the Willow Until It Sings."
Credit: Facebook/Heyday Books
A voice of today, connected to the recent past, like Gordon, Laura's friend.
Lago de las Monos.  Courtesy of Amyjo.
Lago de las Monos. Courtesy of Amyjo.
Credit: Steve Albano
Same as it ever was? Think again.
Mi primo.
Mi primo.
Credit: Laura Cunningham
Seasons of a vernal pool. Oil on toned cotton rag paper,ll X 9 inches. 2007.
Winter: purple needlegrass bunches are green, as the pol is full of water. Ducks [non-smokers], black-necked stilts, and spadefoot toad tadpoles inhabit it.
April: the pool is ringed by wildflowers, goldfields, downingia, lupine, meadow foam, blennosperma.
Summer: heat [and wind]has parched the pool, but a new plant greens up--little Orcutt grass. Pronghorn antelope come to dine on it.
It was near to old Dos Palos, but closer to Vernalis, That ancient mic...
It was near to old Dos Palos, but closer to Vernalis, That ancient mice once had a palace made of reeds. It met their needs. They had lots of seeds. What more could you ask for?
Credit: Laura Cunningham
Dingus Milktoast,
as was discussed earlier in this long-ass thread, the mima mounds of the local variety are explained here at length.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mima_mounds

"Sometimes called hog wallows, vernal pools fill with rainwater in the winter, then dry up in the summer hear. Hardpan, claypan, or volcanic mudflow substrates trap the water in these little basins.
At one time, there may have been about four million acres of vernal pools in the state--in central California, the Coast Ranges, the Delta, the Sierra foothills, along the coast from San Luis Obispo to Santa Barbara, in the Transverse Ranges, and over to the eastern Sierra and the Modoc Plateau. Whole communities of plants and animals developed to fill this habitat....

Because grazing livestock can increase the richness and cover of native annual wildflowers around vernal pools, as well as the number of aquatic invertebrates, range ecologists Randall Jackson and James Bartoleme think these green habitats might have been especially adapted to the large herds of tule elk they attracted.

A great diversity of small crustaceans, such as ostracods, copepods, and fairy shrimp (anostracans) inhabit these temporary pools. Millions of individuals might swim about in a single pool when the rains filled it. As the pool evaporates they enter a "cyst" stage of eggs buried in the dried sediment. In this phase of life they could, like dormant seeds, survive for decades--possibly centuries--until the next pool formed.

Massive steam combines [and the 'gang plow' made by the Holt Brothers of Stockton, and countless nesters, we thank you all, but realize change is inevitable], pulled by as many as three dozen draft animals, leveled many San Joaquin Valley hog wallows and mima mounds during the whet boom of the 1880s. Statewide, from 60 to 90 percent have been lost.
Development continues the damage (see www.biologicaldiversity.org for more information), but preservation and restoration efforts are yielding hopeful results.

Ecologists are realizing that vernal pools are not isolated bits of habitat, but rather embedded with complex landscapes and connected to other habitats, such as upland grasslands, marshes, and riverine communities. Bees in the Family Adrenidae, for example, specialize in pollinating only downingia, blennosperma, meadow foam, and other showy vernal pool wildflowers.
These bees are the dominant pollinators, and thus a key to the wildflowers' reproduction, and because they nest in small holes in the ground in grasslands sometimes a mile away from a vernal pool, they link these habitats."
--from pages on California Grasslands, A State of Change
zBrown

Ice climber
Brujo de la Playa
Mar 7, 2014 - 03:03pm PT
Bears! Please wipe your feet and use potty machines outside.





or you may wind up like this fellow on the pole



It's hard to solve an equation with so many unknowns, so, if you recognize yourself in this photo please notify the Mouse de Merced, via neebee's new high speed connection.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 03:05pm PT
It is common to be smart and to be stupid.
http://www.academia.edu/624021/The_Difference_Between_Being_Smart_Educated_and_Intelligent

Why Smart People Can Be So Stupid is the name of a book in the above article (a fifteen minute read worth every second and, one might hope, sharing with your spouses and partners AND children).

The central character in this book that many of these lessons regarding being "both smart and stupid revolve around is Bill Clinton.

Lincoln was an auto-didact. Honest Abe freed the slaves.
Bill Clinton was a political genius. He got all the raves.
Hillary is smart, but who is smarter yet?
Is it Chelsea who'll turn out to be the wisest Clinton yet?*

A very "interesting" question about a "nice" family.

*You come up with a better rhyme, blood. I've done my time listening to yo' stupid raps.

rSin, Godspeed with the hernia operation today. Peace, tranquility, serenity NOW! And good luck with the medical system now you've finally gotten in the door.



zBrown

Ice climber
Brujo de la Playa
Mar 7, 2014 - 03:15pm PT




Credit: zBrown

http://i1.wp.com/www.dailycal.org/assets/uploads/2012/02/dailycal@dailycal.org_20120221_183618.jpg?153009
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 03:38pm PT


Wurster Hall is not big on bamboo.
Wurster Hall, UC Berkeley School of Architecture.
Wurster Hall, UC Berkeley School of Architecture.
Credit: mouse from merced
But there are many Chinese who study here, nonetheless. Pandaring.
Twenty rock climbers employed in this structure!!!! It's no longer there. Ephemeral nature of grass, I suppose.

norwegian is saving beer cans for his pet proj, extolling the urban sprawl of Kyburz.

zBrown's lookin' good today!!!!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 04:18pm PT
For Four Thousand Simoleans I'd...

give a guided tour of my summer place in Lower Backistan, popularly called the Elephant Laughter House.
Stimulating architecture, home to generations of mice and other critters.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 04:42pm PT
Practical architecture for the street (skater's version).


(biker's version)


(feline version--"cat baroque"--nine, count'em)
Or the home, too, actually.

zBrown

Ice climber
Brujo de la Playa
Mar 7, 2014 - 05:58pm PT
This is billed as the Barrows Hall Mitigation Success Story. I wonder if it succeeded in stopping any jumpers. I don't see any climbers, in fact I don't see anybody at all except the guy in blue hat lower left. Must be an hourly employes picking up OT.

Credit: zBrown

Second look reveals what may be a climber or jumper upper right. My bad.

http://www.calema.ca.gov/HazardMitigation/PublishingImages/Barrows%20Hall031.jpg
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 7, 2014 - 06:27pm PT
Turn on your love light
Credit: Jaybro
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 06:58pm PT
Great grandma wisdom, sounds like, Jaybro de Fresno.


How tall is tall cotton?
The cotton plant is a perennial in many parts of the tropics and subtropics where it may reach a height of 1520 feet. In Florida and across the commercial cotton belt of the U.S., cotton is grown as an annual and attains a plant height of 25 feet or more if moisture and plant nutrients (primarily nitrogen) are not limiting. Air temperatures in the 9095F range are considered near optimum for growth. Very little growth takes place below 60F or above 100F, especially if soil moisture is low. However, cotton is usually considered drought tolerant because of its extensive root system. An average daily growth rate for the roots of inch may occur until first flower when root growth begins to level off and then declines starting about 90 days after planting.
Mr. Gene Grins, cotton synthesizer.
Mr. Gene Grins, cotton synthesizer.
Credit: mouse from merced

What about my green blue jeans, baby?
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/06/fashion/06ORGANICJEANS.html?_r=0

What did the 49ers do for fun when their 'vi's were in the laundry?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levi's_Stadium

What about Belle and the Bottoms?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell-bottoms

You asked for it, Jaybro.

Light shining!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tranquillity,_California




mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 7, 2014 - 07:23pm PT
It's been a fun ride, er, trail.
4,000 of anything is a good start.
feet.
http://www.amc4000footer.org/
holes.
http://www.theguardian.com/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-20318,00.html
miles.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 8, 2014 - 05:50pm PT
Today is International Women's Day.
The fact that you've all "earned" or been given
a day of recognition while men have not speaks for itself.
(It really shouts it out, actually.)

I won't bother saying big deal,
Just stop to think on how you feel,
Then go home and cook that meal.

But who inaugurated the day, and why?

The following text is from the International Business Times online.

Though officially in its 40th edition, the origin of International Women's Day can be traced back to the early twentieth century in the form of various labour movements in North America and across Europe.

The chronology of the day's history according to the UN is as below:

1909: The United States observed the first National Women's Day on 28 Februray in honour of the 1908 garment workers' strike in New York, where women protested against working conditions.

1910: A Women's Day of international significance was established by The Socialist International, a global association of political parties seeking to establish democratic socialism, in Copenhagen to honour the movement for women's rights. However, no fixed date was selected for the observance.

1911: March 19 was marked as International Women's Day for the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland, following the Copenhagen initiative.
Over one million women and men attended rallies and demanded women's rights to vote, to hold public office, to work, to vocational training and to an end to discrimination on the job.

1913-1914: During their peace protest against World War I, women in Russia observed their first International Women's Day on the last Sunday in February 1913.
Elsewhere in Europe, women held rallies either to protest the war or to express solidarity with other activists on or around 8 March in 1914.

1917: Once again on the last Sunday in February (which fell on 8 March on the Gregorian calendar), Russian women went on strike for "Bread and Peace". On 12 March, the Czar stepped down and the provisional Government granted women the right to vote.

1945: The Charter of the United Nations, the first international agreement to affirm the principle of equality between women and men, was signed.

1975: The year was declared International Women's Year by the UN which began celebrating International Women's Day on 8 March.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/international-womens-day-2014-history-origin-1439416

All that I can add is that we can't live without you. Thanks for everything.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Mar 8, 2014 - 05:54pm PT

Architecture in Helsinki - Dream a Little Crazy
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